The Associated Press

Obama adds Alabama civil rights area to Park Service

Martin Luther King Jr.
FILE - In this April 30, 1966 photo, The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd of some 3,000 persons in Birmingham, Ala., in Kelly Ingram Park on the last day of his three-day whistle-stop tour of Alabama, encouraging black voters to vote as a bloc in the primary election. President Barack Obama signed an order Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017, designating an historic civil rights district in Birmingham as a national monument, placing several blocks of a city once rocked by racial violence on par with landmarks including the Grand Canyon. (AP Photo/JT, File) Source: The Associated Press

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — President Barack Obama signed an order Thursday designating an historic civil rights district in Alabama as a national monument, placing several blocks of a city once rocked by racial violence on par with landmarks including the Grand Canyon.

The National Park Service will now have oversight of a downtown section of Birmingham, Alabama — a focal point of civil rights struggles in 1963 against harsh enforcement of laws mandating racial segregation.

Obama, who leaves

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Associated Press

Associated Press4 min readPolitics
End To Government Shutdown In Sight As Dems Halt Filibuster
WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sped toward reopening the government Monday, as Senate Democrats dropped their objections to a temporary funding bill in return for assurances from Republicans leaders that they will soon take up immigration and other conte
Associated Press3 min readPolitics
Women's Marches Organizers Hope To Keep Building Momentum
Thousands of people poured into a football stadium in Las Vegas on the anniversary of women's marches around the world, capping off a weekend of global demonstrations that participants hope will continue building momentum for equality
Associated Press7 min readPolitics
Trump Business Ethics Pledges Left Plenty Room For Profiting
AP Analysis: Trump's promises to separate his businesses from his presidency left plenty of room for profiting