Popular Science

How drone swarms could help protect us from tornadoes

Eyes in the sky
storm drone

Illustration of the MARIA drone, releasing dropsondes to measure conditions within a storm.

Jamey Jacob/Oklahoma State University

Tornadoes tore through much of the Midwest and Southern U.S. this weekend. More than a dozen people were killed, and the trails of destruction stretch from Texas to Maryland.

Tornadoes aren't just dangerous because of their sheer power: they're also extremely difficult to predict. On average, weather monitors give us only

Vous lisez un aperçu, inscrivez-vous pour en lire plus.

Centres d'intérêt associés

Plus de Popular Science

Popular Science1 min de lectureTelecommunications
Calm And Tranquility Live In The Cloud, Too
WHAT DO YOU REACH FOR when you need some soothing? A cozy blanket, a cup of tea, or maybe even your smartphone? That stiff hunk of hardware doesn’t exactly scream comfort, but if you look past its glassy exterior, you’ll find that it lets you relax i
Popular Science10 min de lecture
Breathing Room
During New York City’s first COVID-19 surge, an oasis beckoned stressed and exhausted Mount Sinai Hospital physicians, nurses, and other frontliners. During breaks or between shifts, they could sink into high-backed chairs beneath a canopy of silk tr
Popular Science12 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
The Dimmer Switch
ON HARDSCRABBLE PASS in south-central Colorado, bighorn sheep, patches of ice, and blown-over snow regularly threaten drivers on February days. But once they come out the other side and dive down into the Wet Mountain Valley, the first breathtaking g