Newsweek

How Smart Devices Like Your Fitbit Can Solve Crimes

The best crime-solving detective in the world might be sitting in your living room right now.
A Fitbit fitness tracker. Police in Connecticut used a murdered woman's device to trace her last movements and use the information to charge her husband as the killer
FitBit Surge sports watch

A couple of decades ago, DNA tests were the frontier in solving crimes. But the array of devices we’re putting in our homes and on our bodies are quickly becoming a detective’s new best friend—at least while we still have detectives. Before long, artificial intelligence should be able to analyze the data pouring in from devices and nail criminals better than any human gumshoe. Time to develop a new TV show: CSI: Robots.

Two recent, well-publicized cases have given us a glimpse of this future. One involved Amazon’s Echo device, which is driven by the company’s artificial intelligence software, Alexa. An Echo can sit in a home and listen for verbal

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