The Christian Science Monitor

'Blade Runner 2049': Why some science fiction writers are tired of dystopias

In “Blade Runner 2049,” which opens Friday, post eco-disaster Los Angeles has built a massive coastline wall to fend off rising ocean levels. Few of the overpopulated city’s human or android occupants have ever seen a tree or a real animal. The incessant rain is as dour as Harrison Ford’s facial expressions. Worst of all? One character bemoans the fact that there’s no more cheese in the world.

Recent dystopian blockbusters seem to be jostling in a grim race to be the first to reach the seventh circle of hell in Dante’s “Inferno.” But some science-fiction writers are tired of the sorts of pessimistic futures depicted in movies and TV

'No such thing as defeating the technology''The importance of hope'

Vous lisez un aperçu, inscrivez-vous pour en lire plus.

Plus de The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor2 min de lecturePolitics
The Yeoman Service To Save Yemen
The world’s largest aid effort is also a tool to end the world’s worst conflict. As a humanitarian deal between warring parties in Yemen moves along, peace seems more possible.
The Christian Science Monitor2 min de lecture
Remembering Johnny Clegg, The Voice Of South Africa
Musician Johnny Clegg, who died this week, embraced South African culture and worked to change minds about Nelson Mandela and apartheid.
The Christian Science Monitor2 min de lecture
Points Of Progress: Refugees Are Getting A Chance To Shine, And More
An international show, “Refugees Got Talent,” is putting a new light on the issue of immigration. And Mozambique’s elephant herds are increasing.