Popular Science

I hardly ever use my Nima allergen sensor. I’m still glad I bought it.

The new device to test for peanut contamination seems like an unnecessary luxury—until you need it.

nima sensor gluten

Nima

Prior to the night of August 10, 2017, I harbored an unabashed love for lobster mac and cheese. I realize that undercooked pasta and cheddar sauce are no real place for delicate crustacean meat, but I longed for it anyway—because there’s only one restaurant I know of where I can eat it. Or at least I could, before that evening.

It might seem silly, or perhaps pathetic, to mourn the loss of a food love. I realize that. The reason it’s so crushing is that it was completely avoidable. Months earlier, I had tested a spiffy little device called Nima that would have saved me from a deeply unpleasant evening and preserved my lobster mac obsession, and that same company is now releasing a version that could help the roughly three million people with peanut allergies in the U.S.

Nima announced this morning at the Consumer Electronics Show, an annual tech and gadget convention that

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