Popular Science

The strange side effect of gastric bypass that helps diabetics

We don't really understand how bariatric surgery improves type 2 diabetes.

diabetes blood finger prick

A lovely stock image of an old-fashioned test that diabetics who get gastric bypass surgery might not need anymore.

Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month.

The unpleasant truth about weight loss is that . Most people can lose some weight, but few and proteins that re-adjust as we gain, in essence resetting our baseline body weight and trying to keep us at our new, higher mass.

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