NPR

For Pritzker Prize Winner Balkrishna Doshi, Architecture 'Is Almost Like Clothing'

Doshi is renowned in his field for work that reconciles the flow of space inside traditional Indian temples with modernist design principles.
India's Balkrishna Doshi who won the 2018 Pritzker Architecture Prize poses for the Associated Press at his home in Ahmadabad, India, Wednesday, March 7, 2018. He is the first from India to win architecture's highest honor in the prize's 40-year history. The award was announced Wednesday by Tom Pritzker of the Chicago-based Hyatt Foundation. (Ajit Solanki/AP)

Architect Balkrishna Doshi is renowned in his field for work that reconciles the flow of space inside traditional Indian temples with the design principles of modernists Louis Kahn and Le Corbusier, who he calls his “gurus.”

Last week, at the age of 90, Doshi became the first Indian to win architecture’s highest honor, the Pritzker Prize.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Doshi about his work, his life and his inspiration.

Interview Highlights

On his style of architecture

“I think the kind of architecture that

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