The Atlantic

The Procrastination Doom Loop—and How to Break It

Delaying hard work is all about your mood.
Source: Francois Lenoir / Reuters

When I woke up this morning, I had one goal: Finish this article by 11 a.m.

So, predictably, by the time it was 10 a.m., I had made and consumed two cups of coffee, taken out the trash, cleaned my room while taking a deliberately slow approach to folding my shirts, gone on a walk outside to clear my head, had a thing of yogurt and fruit to reward the physical exertion, sent an email to my aunt and sister, read about 100 Tweets (favorited three; written and deleted one), despaired at my lack of progress, comforted myself by eating a second breakfast, opened several tabs from ESPN.com on my browser ... and written absolutely nothing.

What's the matter Nothing, according to research that conveniently justifies this sort of behavior to my editors. Or, at least, nothing , as Megan McArdle has explained on this site. I'm just a terrible procrastinator.

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