Popular Science

Activated charcoal is showing up everywhere—here are four reasons to avoid it

Food trends are rarely based in scientific fact.
Activated charcoal

Activated charcoal

Alena A/Shutterstock.com

On her Goop website, Gwyneth Paltrow claimed that charcoal lemonade was one of the “best juice cleansers”. That was in 2014. Today, charcoal products—from croissants to capsules—are everywhere. Even high street coffee chains have taken to selling charcoal “shots”.

Some vendors of these products claim that activated charcoal can boost your energy, brighten your skin and reduce wind and bloating. The main claim, though, is that

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