The Atlantic

What Petty Nextdoor Posts Reveal About America

The hyperlocal social-media platform highlights small grievances—and proves that neighbors have more in common than they think.
Source: Josh Cochran

Here are some of the things I heard about in my neighborhood over the past year: A thunderstorm downed a tree, blocking a central road; a shadowy agent called “the night clipper” arose, surreptitiously cutting overhanging bushes while unsuspecting property owners slept; several dogs and cats were lost, found, or “on the loose,” whatever that means for a cat; a federal-grand-jury-summons telephone scam struck; someone sought belly-dancing classes, an apparent alternative to Pilates; and, innumerable times, people deposited bags of dog poop into lawn-clipping and recycling canisters at the curb. All of this news came courtesy of the social-media service Nextdoor. On its website and app, people can post recommendations, updates, and warnings about their building, block, or neighborhood.

Anyone who has subscribed to a neighborhood email listserv—or used the internet—can guess what might go wrong. Social

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