NPR

At The Education Department, Student Artworks Explore Tolerance And Racism

In an exhibit at the department's headquarters in Washington, young artists speak out through their work about race, sexuality and about being young and having a voice.
Harley Walker, Untitled 3. Source: Courtesy of YoungArts

Empathy, tolerance and acceptance: More and more, educators are focusing on the importance of schools' paying attention to stuff other than academics.

And for the past two months, an exhibit at the U.S. Department of Education's headquarters in Washington, D.C., has gathered the work of student artists expressing themselves — through their work — about these issues.

The exhibit is called "Total Tolerance," and it highlights themes of racism, sexism and diversity.

The student art comes from the National YoungArts Foundation, a Miami-based nonprofit that offers mentoring and fellowships to art students from around the country. Their proposal was selected late last year by the Department and the dozens of works of art went on display in May.

"This exhibition, it really exemplifies why we do this work," says Carolina Garcia Jayaram, the foundation's president and CEO. "Together, with the Department of Education, we can signal

Vous lisez un aperçu, inscrivez-vous pour en lire plus.

Plus de NPR

NPR3 min de lecture
'The Most Beautiful Girl In Cuba' Steps Out Of The Headlines And Onto The Page
The Spanish-American war serves as the backdrop for Chanel Cleeton's new novel, which follows a real-life rebel named Evangelina Cisneros, who attracted a lot of attention from American newspapers.
NPR2 min de lectureCrime & Violence
California Man Arrested In Suspected Fake COVID-19 Vaccine Card Operation
Undercover agents bought the fake cards for $20 each at a bar near Stockton. Authorities say they it's the first time they've seen this kind of forgery. Meanwhile, phony cards circulate online.
NPR4 min de lecture
David Swensen, The Greatest Investor You Maybe Never Heard Of, Leaves Powerful Legacy
David Swensen made billions for Yale and revolutionized the way Universities and other non-profits invest. And he strove to teach everyday people how to invest without getting fleeced by Wall Street.