Los Angeles Times

Why Luchita Hurtado at 97 is the hot discovery of the Hammer's 'Made in LA' biennial

LOS ANGELES - At 97, Luchita Hurtado has had enough adventures for three lifetimes. She traipsed around Southern Mexico in the 1940s in search of pre-Columbian archeology. She was pals with sculptor Isamu Noguchi and Mexican modernist Rufino Tamayo. Marcel Duchamp once gave her a foot rub.

"It was the big talk!" she says with a laugh. "All the gossip was that he had massaged my feet."

Hurtado and her feet are again the big talk - this time for her striking paintings of feet and other parts of the female body against depictions of indigenous rugs, blue sky and sumptuous fruit. They are a large part of the recently opened "Made in L.A.," the Hammer Museum's buzzy biennial survey of contemporary art by 32 artists working in Greater Los Angeles.

On a breezy Friday afternoon, the diminutive Hurtado casually strolls into the Hammer's galleries decked out in a striped smock of her own design. "It's an original," she says. "I made this one myself."

She notes that there are similar ones available for sale in the museum's gift shop - and proceeds to lead me to the rack where they hang.

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