The Atlantic

Letters: ‘Find Your Passion’ Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Does

Readers react to a report on a new study suggesting that students should ignore the oft-repeated advice.
Source: Alvaro Barrientos / AP

‘Find Your Passion’ Is Awful Advice

Last week, Olga Khazan unpacked a recent study that questions the common wisdom on how we should choose our careers. Passions aren’t “found,” the study’s authors argued; they’re developed.


Young people routinely mistake “find your passion” to mean “pick your interest early and do not waver from it,” rather than “constantly search for the things that make your soul alive and pursue them diligently.” Many older people fail to add useful explanation when pushing this otherwise ambiguous and worthless catchphrase. Thus misled, young people find themselves pigeon-holed into interests they may no longer have, and cut themselves off from opportunities that don’t match up with their onetime “passion.” Everyone

Vous lisez un aperçu, inscrivez-vous pour en lire plus.

Plus de The Atlantic

The Atlantic6 min de lecture
The Wizard of Oz Invented the ‘Good Witch’
Eighty years ago, MGM’s sparkly pink rendering of Glinda expanded American pop culture’s definition of free-flying women.
The Atlantic5 min de lectureSociety
When Kids Are Straight Until Proven Otherwise
Many gay preteens know early on that they are somehow different, but lack the parental and social support that heterosexuals take for granted.
The Atlantic8 min de lectureSociety
Saved From Death Row, Only to Be Returned
A set of unusual cases in North Carolina brings new attention to racism in death-penalty trials.