Working Mother

20 Halloween Books for Kids That Are Scary and Fun

It's no secret Halloween is one of the most beloved holidays for kids. There's the fun of dressing up in a costume, trick-or-treating and other special activities. To get your kids even more excited about the holiday, we've rounded up the books below. From spooky tales and stories about preparing for and celebrating Halloween to a Frightlopedia of mythical creatures and frightening places, this collection for ages 1 to 12 offers a ton of enjoyable surprises.

Jane Foster's Halloween, by Jane Foster

Jane Foster's Halloween, by Jane Foster

An adorable book full of classic Halloween symbols to introduce to your little one.

Courtesy of Amazon

Jane Foster’s clean, contemporary illustrations are now featured in a seasonal board book with Jane Foster’s Halloween. Iconic symbols of Halloween, including a witch, a bat and a haunted house, manage to appear warm and friendly without losing their style. Perfect for sharing with even the youngest trick-or-treater. Ages Baby-2 ($9, amazon.com).

Peek-a-Boooo! by Sandra Magsamen

Peek-a-Boooo!, by Magsamen

A reminder that a child can be whoever they wish, with

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