AQ: Australian Quarterly

Rural school principals   Professional development and getting the 3Rs correct

Principals of rural schools are integral parts of their communities. They know everyone. They work twenty-four hours a day in the “fish bowl” environment of a country town. They support our country families: those kind folks who protect Australia’s iconic bush environment, our waterways, and grow our food. Principals address a myriad of needs of all the families in the entire district. I briefly examine 5 of these needs in this paper: domestic violence, juvenile justice, mental health, issues relating to indigenous students and, of course, student learning. Principals often address these issues with only the resources within their community at their disposal.

With all the complexities of the job, why would anyone be a school principal, let alone an isolated principal in the country? Rural school principals do an amazing job and are generally highly respected by community members; but who supports them?

In a 2011 survey, 46% of Australian school principals reported having undertaken no training before taking on the job. But why should training for country principals’ matter? For starters, we know that in schools where Australian principals have been trained, students achieve higher results.

46% of Australian school principals reported having undertaken no training before taking on the job.

Rural school principals deserve ready access to professional development and training that empowers them to enact their best work. Only when principals are supported can they get their 3Rs correct: Relationships, Responsibilities and Resourcing. In turn, principals can then support students get their own 3Rs correct, thereby lifting education attainment of rural students.

Australian research shows us that

Vous lisez un aperçu, inscrivez-vous pour en lire plus.

Plus de AQ: Australian Quarterly

AQ: Australian Quarterly2 min de lecture
The Tall Poppy Campaign
In 2019, the Australian Institute of Policy and Science celebrated 20 years of promoting young Australian researchers through the Young Tall Poppy Awards (aips.net.au/tall-poppy-campaign). These awards were one of the first in the country to recognis
AQ: Australian Quarterly11 min de lecture
The Isolated Political Class
If you ever thought that politicians are out of touch, then you’re not alone. There is mounting evidence that Australia’s political class is increasingly isolated from the citizens it serves. This has occurred in an era of crisis management when comb
AQ: Australian Quarterly14 min de lectureSociety
Agenda 2030: Australia’s Disappearing Development Goals
By 2015, then Secretary-General of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon announced that “the MDGs helped to lift more than one billion people out of extreme poverty, to make inroads against hunger, to enable more girls to attend school than ever before and