NPR

Supreme Court Justices Seem Incredulous At Repeated Racial Bias In Jury Selection

In a Mississippi death penalty case, the justices were skeptical of the way the state picked and dismissed black jurors and appeared ready not to uphold the conviction.

The U.S. Supreme Court signaled strongly on Wednesday that it is likely to rule for a death-row inmate in Mississippi who was prosecuted six times for the same crime by a prosecutor with a history of racial bias in jury selection.

The arguments, more passionate and fact-filled than usual, also had a surprise ending when Justice Clarence Thomas posed a question — the first time in three years.

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