NPR

In Major Shift, Mormon Church Rolls Back Controversial Policies Toward LGBT Members

"We want to reduce the hate and contention so common today," said LDS President Dallin Oaks. Church doctrine will consider same-sex marriage "a serious transgression" but not apostasy.
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced Thursday that it will no longer consider people in same-sex marriages to be apostates. Here, a pride flag flies in front of the Historic Mormon Temple in Salt Lake City as part of a 2015 protest of the church's LGBT policies. Source: George Frey

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced on Thursday that it was reversing its controversial 2015 policy that classified people in same-sex marriages as "apostates." The Mormon church had also barred the children of such marriages from blessing or baptism until age 18.

The change was attributed to President Dallin Oaks, and the church said it was intended to "help affected families" and "to reduce the hate and contention

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