NPR

Trees Are Key To Fighting Urban Heat — But Cities Keep Losing Them

Trees are one of the best ways to fight deadly urban heat, but U.S. cities lose millions every year. And many low-income areas are starting at a disadvantage.

Annie Haigler steps out of her home in Louisville, Ky., pulling a handkerchief out of her pocket to dab sweat off her forehead. She enjoys sitting on her porch, especially to watch the sunrise. She has always been a morning person.

But as the day progresses, the heat can be unbearable for her. On summer days like this, when highs reach into the 90s, the lack of trees in her neighborhood is hard for Haigler to ignore.

"That's what I'm accustomed to trees doing: They bring comfort. You don't notice it, you don't think about it. But they bring comfort to you," she says.

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