TIME

Rudy cashes in

IN THE STORIED CAREER OF AMERICA’S most famous mayor, the last five weeks have been quite a chapter. During a shouting match on CNN on Sept. 19, Rudy Giuliani denied and then, 30 seconds later, admitted to playing a central role in President Donald Trump’s efforts to get a foreign country to investigate his top 2020 rival, Joe Biden. Five days later, Giuliani went nuclear on a radio host during a joint TV appearance, shouting, “Shut up, moron, shut up!” as he tried to drown out accusations that he was making things up. Trump’s personal lawyer capped it off on Oct. 16 by pocket-dialing a reporter for NBC News and inadvertently leaving a lengthy message as he talked to an unidentified partner about potentially lucrative business in Turkey and Bahrain.

Some people were worried. Giuliani’s longtime associate Bernard Kerik says he keeps getting asked, “Is he O.K.?” Walter Mack, who ran an organized-crime unit for Giuliani back when they were prosecutors in Manhattan in the 1980s, says he wonders the same. Mack says if he saw him now, “I would talk to him as a friend and a fellow prosecutor, and just be certain he was getting good advice and that he was not losing sight of his own standards and morals.” Kerik, who was Giuliani’s top cop in New York and later served three years in federal prison for tax fraud and other crimes, talks regularly with his old friend. Giuliani, he says, is just “vocal” now that he doesn’t have to worry about “running for office.”

But it’s a bewildering turn of events for a person who at one point in his career had been among the most admired public figures in the country. Giuliani was always colorful. As mayor, he was a New York archetype come to life: the fast-talking, Bronx-accented wheeler-dealer, complete with mistresses, sharp suits and primo seats at Yankee Stadium. And many loved him for being an iconoclast. He was the law-and-order mayor who cleaned up Times Square, a Republican who believed in gun control and gay rights, a self-described pro-choice Republican as at home at the city’s glimmering galas as at the televised perp walk of a criminal. With exuberant F-you energy, he seemed to embody the city itself. And for the brief post-9/11 moment when Americans were all New Yorkers, the whole country became Giuliani’s constituents too.

His latest brush with history is revealing a darker side, something that suggests not just Giuliani unbound, but untethered from the values he once espoused. And as the House impeachment inquiry accelerates, and witness after witness describes Giuliani as the prime enabler behind what Democrats say are impeachable offenses committed by Trump, Giuliani’s behavior may end up having historic consequences.

So what is going on with him? Interviews with those close

Vous lisez un aperçu, inscrivez-vous pour en lire plus.

Plus de TIME

TIME9 min de lecture
The News Gets To Move On
The therapy and medication helped. So did a pottery class. Anything to take her mind off that day. Then Pacella retraumatized herself. In February, she testified before a state legislative committee in support of a bill that would regulate rifles and
TIME7 min de lecture
Dimming the Lights
EVERYONE HAS AN OPINION ABOUT WHERE Felicia Anna works. For the past nine years, the 33-year-old Romanian sex worker has attracted clients by standing in the glowing windows of the world’s most famous red-light district. The area’s reputation, she sa
TIME2 min de lecture
In Kids’ Drawings, A Look At Migrant Life
“AMERICA, WHERE THEY DIDN’T LET ME IN,” 11-year-old Jose wrote in Spanish next to a picture of mountains and trees in blue, green and brown. He also drew a river—the Rio Grande, which separates him from Brownsville, Texas, where his family hopes to c