NPR

The Harvard Law Student And DREAMer Whose Fate Could Be Decided By Supreme Court

Mitchell Santos Toledo was brought to the U.S. when he was 2. "This is our home," he says.
Mitchell Santos Toledo is one of 700,000 DACA recipients whose fate could be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, which hears arguments on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program this week. Source: Laura Beltrán Villamizar

Mitchell Santos Toledo came to the United States when he was 2. His parents had temporary visas when they brought him and his 5-year-old sister to the country. They never left. This spring, Santos Toledo will graduate from Harvard Law School. He is one of the 700,000 DREAMers whose fate in the U.S. may well be determined by a Supreme Court case to be argued Tuesday.

For now, Santos Toledo cannot be deported. In 2012, President Obama put in place the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which deferred deportation for these young people if they met certain specifications and passed a background check. After that, their

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