Popular Science

Why do some animals engage in same-sex sexual behavior? The better question is... why not?

These scientists believe that an indiscriminately-mating ancestor may have left same-sex sexual behavior in our DNA.
It's perfectly natural.
It's perfectly natural.

Earlier this year two male penguins at the Berlin Zoo made headlines for co-parenting an abandoned egg—but the pair aren’t an anomaly. To date, scientists have recorded same-sex sexual behaviors in more than 1,500 animal species, from domestic cattle to nematode worms.

Scientists have proposed countless hypotheses to explain why same-sex sexual behaviors (SSB) persist despite the supposed Darwinian paradox—why would animals spend time and energy on sexual activities that have zero chance of resulting in?

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