Popular Science

Why do some animals engage in same-sex sexual behavior? The better question is... why not?

These scientists believe that an indiscriminately-mating ancestor may have left same-sex sexual behavior in our DNA.
It's perfectly natural.
It's perfectly natural.

Earlier this year two male penguins at the Berlin Zoo made headlines for co-parenting an abandoned egg—but the pair aren’t an anomaly. To date, scientists have recorded same-sex sexual behaviors in more than 1,500 animal species, from domestic cattle to nematode worms.

Scientists have proposed countless hypotheses to explain why same-sex sexual behaviors (SSB) persist despite the supposed Darwinian paradox—why would animals spend time and energy on sexual activities that have zero chance of resulting in?

Vous lisez un aperçu, inscrivez-vous pour en lire plus.

Plus de Popular Science

Popular Science1 min de lecture
Take Your Most Relaxing Bath Ever
A GOOD SOAK is a great way to unwind. Granted, this luxurious indulgence isn’t the booming field of research it should be, but the data we do have confirms its soothing effects. One Japanese study of the benefits of tub time found it can calm the ner
Popular Science13 min de lectureMedical
Have A Nice Trip
THE FIRST TIME I get high on Ketamine, I'm not sure I'm doing it right. The setting is nice enough: I’m tucked beneath a gray weighted blanket, reclining on a creamy leather chair. Headphones deliver the sort of playlist you’d find by searching for “
Popular Science2 min de lecturePsychology
What’s The Most Soothing Sound In The World?
ON A CHILLY EVENING in Berlin, Suk-Jun Kim’s research has him eavesdropping in a stranger’s bedroom. Four family members are gathered around the bed, swapping nostalgic stories. Kim gently asks them to hum together. Their voices start off flat and he