Kiplinger

Stock Market Winners, Losers and Lessons Learned

Ryan Ermey: We hear at Kiplinger's recommend a lot of investments, but rarely do you hear how our portfolios are actually doing. Kiplinger.com senior investing editor Kyle Woodley joins the show today to do exactly that. We're talking winners, losers and the investing lessons we can learn from them in our main segment and we'll have some new picks, as well.

Ryan Ermey: On today's show, Sandy and I clear up confusion surrounding stimulus payments in 2020 taxes and a new edition of wild pitches features angel investing opportunities and suspiciously high-interest rates. That's all ahead on this episode of Your Money's Worth. Stick around.

Ryan Ermey: Welcome to Your Money's Worth. I'm Kiplinger's associate editor Ryan Ermey, joined as always by senior editor Sandy Block. Sandy, how are you?

Sandy Block: Good. Scored a very large box of Clorox wipes today, because I actually have somebody on the inside. So I'm feeling good about things today, Ryan.

Ryan Ermey: That's pretty good. I recently got a brand-new box of 50 masks for something like $12. If you're not following Fat Kid Deals on Twitter folks, go... and look, are you going to get maybe five tweets a day about some limited edition Jordans that you're never going to buy that are a little bit cheaper than usual? Yeah, you're going to get a few of those, but also deals on masks, inflatable pools. I got a weightlifting bench. Some of the really essential quarantine items that you can find for cheap. So Fat Kid Deals. Free advertising. Go and check it out.

Ryan Ermey: Speaking of quarantine stuff, we thought we were going to be able to bring news of a potential second round of stimulus checks today. But it doesn't... because, come on Sandy, who doesn't like leading off the show...?

Sandy Block: Free money. Here's a check.

Ryan Ermey: Yeah, exactly. Free money. Instead, it's cheap inflatable pools. Alas, nothing is reportable yet on the second stimulus front. So we're going to have to wait. We'll have news about that as soon as it breaks. Well, not as soon as it breaks. As soon as it breaks the following Monday, but suffice to say that there is more bipartisan momentum for a second round of stimulus checks. So we'll keep you updated. Now in the meantime, we have received some reader mail regarding some stimulus check confusion.

Sandy Block: That's right. And people are still confused about the first round of stimulus checks and the biggest source of... well, two things. One are people who haven't gotten it yet, but the other source of confusion is if I got too much, do I have to pay it back when I file my taxes next year?

Sandy Block: And here's one example of a question we got. He says my ex-wife and I have 50/50 custody of our son. Take turns requesting the deductions. We both have similar compensation close to the limit for the 2020 stimulus check. He received a check, because he had the deduction for his son in 2019. She didn't receive one. But since he doesn't have his son's deduction for 2020, he's wondering will I have to give my check back in higher taxes, will my tax bill be adjusted? And he says, while my situation is fairly specific, there's a bigger question regarding how the regulations will be published, who might have to return the benefit and who might not.

: And the good news is the answer from , our tax expert, is you will not. The IRS... there are some people who for various reasons may have gotten more than they were supposed

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