NPR

Johns Hopkins, Long Believed An Abolitionist, Actually Owned Slaves, University Says

Researchers found census records showing the entrepreneur and philanthropist owned slaves as late as 1850, contrary to the long-held belief that his family freed all slaves when he was a boy.
The founder of Johns Hopkins University was discovered to be a slaveowner in contradiction to the long-held narrative that the philanthropist was an abolitionist. Source: Rob Carr

Historians for Johns Hopkins University discovered that the founder of the Baltimore-based school owned slaves, contrary to the long-held belief that the wealthy philanthropist was a staunch abolitionist.

Researchers Martha S. Jones and Allison Seyler made the discovery after delving into previously undiscovered government census records as part of a university-led project on the school's history.

The findings "complicate the understanding"Wednesday.

Vous lisez un aperçu, inscrivez-vous pour en lire plus.

Plus de NPR

NPR3 min de lecture
'The Plot' Works As Literary Satire, But Its Mystery Fizzles
Jean Hanff Korelitz's tale of dirty deeds in the world of letters skewers pompous male authors with sly humor — but her approach to the central mystery might have you guessing the ending too soon.
NPR2 min de lectureInternational Relations
Israeli Airstrikes On Gaza Continue After Global Pro-Palestinian Protests
Israeli attacks killed at least 42 people and toppled three buildings in Gaza. U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres called the violence "utterly appalling" and urged an end to the fighting.
NPR4 min de lectureInternational Relations
Medics: Israeli Airstrikes Kill 23 In Downtown Gaza City
The Gaza Health Ministry said another 50 people were wounded, making it the deadliest single attack since fighting broke out between Israel and the territory's militant Hamas rulers nearly a week ago.