Nautilus

Can You Treat Loneliness By Creating an Imaginary Friend?

Tulpamancers imagine talking to the tulpa, sometimes for more than an hour a day, and eventually, perhaps after several months, the tulpa will start talking back.Photo Illustration by LeaDigszammal / Shutterstock

id you ever have an imaginary friend? If you didn’t, chances are you know someone who did. Imaginary companions, as scholars call them, are quite common, and aren’t strictly associated with childhood. They can last into the upper teen years. One of the most striking things about imaginary companions, which are generally considered harmless, is, of course, their apparent autonomy. To the child,

Vous lisez un aperçu, inscrivez-vous pour en lire plus.

Plus de Nautilus

Nautilus5 min de lectureReligion & Spirituality
Martin Luther Rewired Your Brain: How mass literacy, spurred by Protestantism, reconfigured our neural pathways.
Your brain has been altered, neurologically rewired as you acquired a particular skill. This renovation has left you with a specialized area in your left ventral occipital temporal region, shifted facial recognition into your right hemisphere, reduce
Nautilus9 min de lecturePsychology
That Is Not How Your Brain Works: Forget these scientific myths to better understand your brain and yourself.
The 21st century is a time of great scientific discovery. Cars are driving themselves. Vaccines against deadly new viruses are created in less than a year. The latest Mars Rover is hunting for signs of alien life. But we’re also surrounded with scien
Nautilus6 min de lecturePsychology
Why Making Our Brains Noisier Feels Good: A counterintuitive approach to improving our mental health.
Not since World War II has there been as great a threat to mental health as the current COVID-19 pandemic, according to Aiden James. The challenges to our mental health won’t “stop when the virus is under control and there are few people in hospital,