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The Book of Tomorrow: A Novel

The Book of Tomorrow: A Novel

Écrit par Cecelia Ahern

Raconté par Ali Coffey


The Book of Tomorrow: A Novel

Écrit par Cecelia Ahern

Raconté par Ali Coffey

évaluations:
3.5/5 (80 évaluations)
Longueur:
8 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jan 25, 2011
ISBN:
9780062027306
Format:
Livre audio

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Description

"A sweet, life-affirming tale . . . with a liberal sprinkling of magic."
-Marie Claire (UK)

"Filled with family secrets, intrigue, and magic aplenty."
-Booklist

Bestselling author Cecelia Ahern follows The Gift and P.S. I Love You with the mesmerizing story of a teenaged girl coming face-to-face with grief, growth, and magic in the Irish countryside, after a mysterious book begins to reveal her own memories from one day in the future. Perfect for long-time fans of Ahern, as well as for younger readers coming to her for the first time, The Book of Tomorrow's strong voice and sophisticated storytelling mark an instant new classic from this already beloved author.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jan 25, 2011
ISBN:
9780062027306
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre


À propos de l'auteur

Cecelia Ahern is the author of the international bestsellers PS, I Love You; Love, Rosie; If You Could See Me Now; There's No Place Like Here; Thanks for the Memories; The Gift; The Book of Tomorrow; and The Time of My Life. Her books are published in forty-six countries and have collectively sold more than sixteen million copies. The daughter of the former prime minister of Ireland, she lives in Dublin.

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3.7
80 évaluations / 72 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    A sweet story of a young girl coming to terms with the death of her father.
  • (3/5)
    The Book of Tomorrow is touted as an Adult fantasy, but to me it read (or rather sounded, as I listened to the audio book) more like a YA Gothic suspense. Unraveling the mystery was pretty good, but I felt cheated that I still don't know the origins of the magic of the "Book of Tomorrow"diary. And in the audio book, the narrator' lovely Irish lilt had me confusing the main character's name, Tamara, with the word "tomorrow", so that caused me further confusion throughout the story at key places.I was hoping for more magic.
  • (4/5)
    Here’s the plot as I knew it going into the story: Tamara’s dad dies, her mother withdraws deeply into her grief, and the previously wealthy mother and daughter most go live with poor relations to get by. While struggling to fit into her new life, Tamara finds a book, which every night reveals the events which will happen the next day.Based on the description, I was nervous that this book would be very emotional, bordering on too angsty or too sad for me to enjoy. I’m not sure what drew me to read it any way, perhaps the intriguing premise and cover picture, but whatever it was, my instincts were good. Although there were certainly emotional and thought-provoking elements to the story, the story felt most like a really good mystery to me.This wasn’t the Agatha-Christie-style mystery I usually go for, with a clear crime, defined suspect list, and deductions based on human nature. Instead it was something fresh and new and wonderful. At the beginning, Tamara simply has a suspicion that something is not right. Perhaps her aunt isn’t doing as much as she should to help her mother. Perhaps her aunt’s and uncle’s eccentricities hide something more sinister. But the may also just be a quiet, slightly odd couple doing what they think is best for Tamara and her mom. Initially, it’s hard to say and events move slowly.After Tamara finds the book, the pace picks up a lot and the story comes into it’s own. I particularly liked the unique way in which parts of the mystery were revealed. Sometimes answers were spelled out in the book Tamara found. Other times, she has to do her best to improve on the day she read about. The back and forth between the book and the real events could have become confusing. Fortunately, the author helpfully references the appropriate book entry as a day goes by which clearly made the distinction between the book and what really happened.Finally, I liked that the initially spoiled Tamara grows as a person through her experiences. Having the book forces her to realize that her actions have an impact on the future, causing her to approach her life more deliberately. This was a very well-written, creative approach to telling a story and I would highly recommend it. Now I just need to catch up to the rest of the world and read Cecelia Ahern’s PS I Love You .
  • (1/5)
    Couldn't get into this at all. Different style from her usual thing. Hardly any dialogue. Book reads like a monologue memoir of a boring person.
  • (3/5)
    I love Cecelia Ahern's books, but this novel really fell flat for me. There was a ton of potential but I felt like she had too many ideas, which resulted in underdeveloped characters and disappointment. I wasn't impressed and this may be the one book of Ahern's that I never purchase.
    Like everyone else has said the cover was beautiful and I really did like having my own little built in bookmark. However, I have a feeling the cover was made so beautiful because there really wasn't anything all that worthwhile inside.
  • (5/5)
    After Tamara Goodwin's father finds himself unable to pay off all his debts and commits suicide, she and her mother are exiled to the countryside, to Tamara's aunt and uncle.

    Gone is the pool and bath with a built in television. Gone are the posh Dublin friends and fancy foods; the shopping trips to London and weekends in Paris. Now Tamara finds herself living in a tiny village, in the gatehouse to an ancient castle, with her crazy aunt and her uncle who hardly ever speaks a word. And her mother who's still 'grieving'--but in a way that means that she never comes out of her room or speaks to anyone.

    Tamara's going stir crazy when, one day not long after her arrival, Marcus, a local boy, shows up driving the traveling library. Tamara finds one book in the library that she decides and after finally prying open the lock on it, she finds diary entries. Entries written in her own handwriting. Dated the next day.

    Tamara's at first skeptical, but with her life seemingly flying out of control--just what is going on with her mother, and why won't her aunt have her seen by a doctor?--and the journal turning out right that first day, Tamara decides to give listening a shot.

    Maybe the book will give her some answers.


    I've only read two of Cecelia Ahern's other books, PS I Love You and Rosie Dunne/Love, Rosie, and while I really liked those books, this one was loads better. The Book of Tomorrow had a lot more depth than Cecelia Ahern's other books that I've read. It was suspenseful and emotional--but without being Lifetime moviesque--and the characters, their relationships and the different dynamics were really well done and, quite frankly, rather unexpected, too.

    This is all on top of a character that would not have been at all out of place in a Hitchcock or Stephen King tale. She was creepy, I'm telling you. As I've said I haven't read all of Ahern's writing so I don't know if any of them are in the same vein as Book of Tomorrow but I certainly hope that some of her future work is because, if so, readers are certainly in for a treat.

    While Cecelia Ahern can do romance and sweet and cute, she can really do mystery with a hint of creepy & magic.


    The main character in The Book of Tomorrow is a teenager, but Tomorrow is really an ageless book (if that's even a thing--if not, I am now making it one!). Readers of any age--those of Tamara's age up to those of Rosealeen's age and beyond--will easily enjoy this tale. There is mention (and I believe just mention/recollection more so than action) of teens doing things that good teens maybe wouldn't do, so some might not like it for younger teens there. But because nothing's explicit and everything really does have consequences, I really wouldn't even stop them from reading this.


    10/10

    (won a galley from the publisher)
  • (4/5)
    I like the theme: foretelling something in the future, with the Irish castle ruins as background.. Makes me imagining things and want to go to Ireland!
  • (4/5)
    I really loved this book! When I started reading I figured it would just be chick lit (which is not necessarily a bad thing), but it was so much more. It turned into a fantasy of sorts, with a diary that tells Tamara today what is going to happen tomorrow. I would not normally pick up a book with that slant, so I am glad this was just sprung on me (I guess I didn't read the summary of the book terrible well before reading it). Sufficed to say, if you would like a book with a very honest, well written voice and a little bit of mystery, give The Book of Tomorrow a go.
  • (5/5)
    Instead of rags to riches, Tamara Goodwin and her mother went from riches to rags. After Mr. Goodwin committed suicide they were penniless and went from a huge house to a small cottage that Tamara and her mother had to share with relatives.Enduring her uncle's crude ways, tolerating her aunt's constant cooking and hovering, having no friends around, having nothing to do in this small town, and dealing with her mother's silence was not how Tamara wanted her days to be. Her aunt and uncle were quite bizarre and seemed to be hiding something. What it was Tamara had no idea. Everything was hush hush and Rosaleen seemed to hide behind her huge tables of food and Arthur said nothing about anything. Tamara wasn't a pleasant young lady to begin with, and this situation didn't improve her mood.As mean as she was, Tamara was quite funny....always joking about things. She also kept looking back at her life and wondering if it really had been better when she was rich. There was a lot of introspection, and the characters' lives were paralleled with inanimate objects and thoughts. Tamara actually met interesting people in the town and discovered a history of the castle.The main focus of the book was based on a diary Tamara found in a mobile library that stopped in "Hicksville" once a week. The diary was quite interesting as well as shocking because of the content. The content contained something hard to believe. She would read the diary every day and the next day it would be filled with pages of even more interest.The book was skillfully written....the author has a great style. You can actually see the grimaces on the character's faces simply because of the wonderful description; you can also feel Tamara's frustration, and Rosaleen's fear of something.The book was imaginative, creative, and a book that was difficult to put down.....a marvelous read. It also was magical and a little out of the ordinary. Being out of the ordinary made it unique, enjoyable, and appealing. I liked the characters for the most part, but they were an odd bunch, especially Rosaleen with her odd ideas and her secret ways of dealing with situations and people.I would consider THE BOOK OF TOMORROW a light read but with undercurrents of secrets, revenge, and jealousy along with a web of deceit and all of it being nicely tied up in the surprise ending. 5/5This book was given to me free of charge by the publisher for an honest review.
  • (4/5)
    good book, not as good as PS I Love You, but this one was interesting...there were a few spots I would get a little confused on what was happening but in the end it all came together.
  • (5/5)
    I found this book on my godmother's shelf when I was 14 years old. I remember being attracted to the cover and the title of the book (even if I knew that I shouldn't judge a book by its cover...) at that time I only thought it was pretty so I took it. I began reading it and I couldn't stop, I read it for a whole 2-3 days straight and I rememberd enjoying it and even being satisfied by the end.
  • (3/5)
    Not as good as her other ones. Not as multi-layered as IF YOU COULD SEE ME NOW, THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES or THE GIFT. Nice light read.
  • (3/5)
    Tamara Goodwin has had a great life, full of luxury and ease, but now her father's business has gone bust and he's committed suicide and she has had to move to her uncle's farm to live. There her mother spends her days in bed and her aunt watches her like a hawk. Then Tamara finds a mysterious book in a travelling library and it tells her the future, what she does with it is going to be interesting. Not bad but somehow it lacked something to make it into a good read. Tamara though was quite realistic and quite teenage, and you could see the things that happen as being fairly realistic outside the predictive diary.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this book. It took a bit to get use to the narrator's accent.I knew there was something going on. The only part I figured out ahead of Tamara was the age thing. The sister said she will never lie to Tamara and she would repeatedly state Tamara's age as a year older.I checked the information on beekeeping is accurate:Smoke calms bees; it initiates a feeding response in anticipation of possible hive abandonment due to fire. Smoke also masks alarm pheromones released by guard bees or when bees are squashed in an inspection.
  • (4/5)
    I won this book in a giveaway. It was amazing! It kept me intrigued from the beginning as there was a mystery surrounding the main character. The story is told by a 16 yr old girl so this one would even be good for a YA fan.
  • (3/5)
    Surprisingly gripping at the end. Thought it was going to be total bollocks but I actually enjoyed it overall. The writing isn't great but the story was pretty good.
  • (5/5)
    Instead of rags to riches, Tamara Goodwin and her mother went from riches to rags. After Mr. Goodwin committed suicide they were penniless and went from a huge house to a small cottage that Tamara and her mother had to share with relatives.Enduring her uncle's crude ways, tolerating her aunt's constant cooking and hovering, having no friends around, having nothing to do in this small town, and dealing with her mother's silence was not how Tamara wanted her days to be. Her aunt and uncle were quite bizarre and seemed to be hiding something. What it was Tamara had no idea. Everything was hush hush and Rosaleen seemed to hide behind her huge tables of food and Arthur said nothing about anything. Tamara wasn't a pleasant young lady to begin with, and this situation didn't improve her mood.As mean as she was, Tamara was quite funny....always joking about things. She also kept looking back at her life and wondering if it really had been better when she was rich. There was a lot of introspection, and the characters' lives were paralleled with inanimate objects and thoughts. Tamara actually met interesting people in the town and discovered a history of the castle.The main focus of the book was based on a diary Tamara found in a mobile library that stopped in "Hicksville" once a week. The diary was quite interesting as well as shocking because of the content. The content contained something hard to believe. She would read the diary every day and the next day it would be filled with pages of even more interest.The book was skillfully written....the author has a great style. You can actually see the grimaces on the character's faces simply because of the wonderful description; you can also feel Tamara's frustration, and Rosaleen's fear of something.The book was imaginative, creative, and a book that was difficult to put down.....a marvelous read. It also was magical and a little out of the ordinary. Being out of the ordinary made it unique, enjoyable, and appealing. I liked the characters for the most part, but they were an odd bunch, especially Rosaleen with her odd ideas and her secret ways of dealing with situations and people.I would consider THE BOOK OF TOMORROW a light read but with undercurrents of secrets, revenge, and jealousy along with a web of deceit and all of it being nicely tied up in the surprise ending. 5/5This book was given to me free of charge by the publisher for an honest review.
  • (3/5)
    Tamara Goodwin, shy of her 17th birthday, has had her life turned upside down. She lived a privileged life living in a contemporary mansion in a seaside resort near Dublin, Ireland. She has never had to want for anything, given everything she ever wanted. However, circumstances quickly change when her father commits suicide, loses his fortune, and their home is repossessed. She and her mother must move to the country and into the simple home of her mother’s brother and wife. Her mother, deeply depressed, has become a recluse in her bedroom. Tamara is lonely, bored and deeply wishes to return to the life she had in Dublin.

    However, her boredom is diminished when a bookmobile appears shortly after their arrival. In it she discovers an attractive book locked with a clasp. With the assistance Sister Ignatius, a local nun that befriends her, she is able to open it but discovers that it contains only blank pages – a diary. Sister Ignatius recommends that she record her thoughts. However, when she opens the book, she discovers her words have already been record but for the next day. She now faces a dilemma: Does she live her tomorrows as written or she change events?

    Although this novel was more a YA and coming-of-age novel, I believe that adults will find Tamara's experiences enjoyable and thought-provoking, which I did. The primary characters were well-developed as well as the plot. Although set in Irish countryside, this story could have been set anywhere and anytime.
  • (2/5)
    For a book with so much potential, this one falls short. It is executed poorly, with lackluster character developments and gaping plot holes. Tamara Goodwin is a spoiled, rich teenager girl, who finds herself in the country because of a poor decision by her father. She, along with her incompetent mother, stays with her aunt and uncle, Rosaleen and Arthur.The story is narrated by Tamara, in her whiny, privileged teenage voice. In the beginning, the pace of the story is incredibly slow. Pages and pages are dedicated to her recount of life before moving to the country, followed by seemingly meaningless and lengthy descriptions of country life. In particular, Tamara pays special attention to the castle in town, which is now more of a ruin, and nothing like its former self. One day, she is visited by a travelling library bus, and discovers a book that foretells the future, or tomorrow to be exact. My problem with this book is that Ahern takes too long to get to the actual story. While it’s nice to discover a character’s backstory, and be presented with vivid scenic descriptions for full immersion in the story, all of that is meaningless if we don’t know why we’re reading the story in the first place. “They say a story loses something with each telling. If that is the case, this story has lost nothing, for it’s the first time it’s been told. This story is one for which some people will have to suspend their disbelief. If this wasn’t happening to me, I would be one of those people.” To begin a story with such an enticing opening, only to tease your reader for a hundred of so pages (yes I counted) before telling them said story is just cruel in my opinion. Once the story ‘officially’ begins, with the book of tomorrow in Tamara’s hands, the pace of the story picks up quickly, and ends climactically. However, gaping plot holes are still left wide open, and several questions are still left unanswered at the end.
  • (5/5)
    Inhaltsangabe:Tamara Goodwin hat ihren Vater tot aufgefunden, nachdem er sich das Leben genommen hat. Die 16jährige, stets vom Erfolg ihres Vaters verwöhnt und zugeschüttet mit allen materiellen Dingen des Lebens, muss sich mit der Tatsache auseinandersetzen, das sie alles verloren haben, denn der Vater stand kurz vor dem finanziellen Ruin.Zusammen mit ihrer traumatisierten Mutter muss sie zu Verwandten aufs Land ziehen. Tante Rosaleen und Onkel Arthur nehmen sie herzlich gern auf und versuchen ihnen das Leben so angenehm wie möglich zu machen. Die Mutter zieht sich innerlich zurück und spricht nicht mehr groß. Und Tamara langweilt sich.Eines Tages findet sie in einem Bücherbus ein sonderbares Buch. Sie nimmt es mit und schlägt es auf: Leere Seiten. Die Nonne Schwester Ignatius schlägt ihr vor, es als Tagebuch zu benutzen. Und gerade will sie beginnen zu schreiben, als sie einen Eintrag entdeckt: Mit ihrer Handschrift und vom nächsten Tag.Und es passiert immer wieder. Und während sie einem großen Geheimnis auf die Spur kommt, lernt sie von sich selbst und dem Leben.Mein Fazit:Die ersten 100 Seiten waren etwas mühselig. Tamara erzählt die Geschichte aus ihrer eigenen Sicht und macht manchmal einige verwirrende Sprünge. Und sie gibt selbst von sich zu, ein richtiges Ekel gewesen zu sein. Sie ist anfangs zynisch, zickig und launisch gewesen zu sein. Das kam daher, weil der Vater sie mit allem überhäufte, was man mit Geld kaufen konnte.Aber der Verlust des Vaters, mit dem sie vor dem Tod auch noch einen bösen Streit hatte, macht ihr schwer zu schaffen. Und der Einzug bei Tante Rosaleen und Onkel Arthur machen ihr die Sache nicht einfacher. Denn Rosaleen benimmt sich merkwürdig und sofort wird nicht nur dem Leser, sondern auch Tamara klar, das sie etwas verbirgt. Und die Spannung steigert sich mit jeder Seite, denn Tamara ist vor allen Dingen auch neugierig. Sie sorgt sich auch um ihre Mutter und auch da hat Rosaleen scheinbar die Hände mit im Spiel.Die letzten 100 Seiten habe ich in einem Rutsch gelesen, denn ich wollte wissen, was es für ein großes Geheimnis gab. Und auch die Entwicklung von Tamara interessierte mich. Sie wird einem Ende dann doch sehr sympathisch. Ein paar Fragen sind allerdings offen geblieben, aber ansonsten empfand ich die Geschichte als sehr ergreifend.Von mir bekommt es 4,5 von 5 Sternchen.Anmerkung: Die Rezension stammt vom Juli 2010.Veröffentlicht am 22.11.16!
  • (2/5)
    Audio book narrated by Ali Coffey

    Tamara Goodwin is a child of privilege, living with her mother and father in a seaside mansion just outside Dublin, with her own suite of rooms. Nearly seventeen, she’s looking forward to getting a car for her birthday. But all that ends when her father goes bankrupt and takes an overdose of sleeping pills, leaving Tamara and her mother with the ruins of a life they once knew. Selling everything they can to pay off debts, they move to the small Irish village where her mother’s brother and sister-in-law live in the gatehouse of a once elegant but now burned ruin of a castle. There is NOTHING to do here. The nearest village (barely more than a tavern and a couple of houses) is a 15-minute drive away, and Tamara hasn’t a car. Her mother is lost in a fog, spending her days sleeping and virtually never leaving her room, let alone the house. Her aunt and uncle are busy with their own lives and never answer any of Tamara’s questions. Things begin to change when the local bookmobile stops and she finds an odd book with no title. It turns out to be a blank journal/diary with magical properties. Each night the diary writes itself – in Tamara’s handwriting – describing what will happen tomorrow. Following the diary’s lead, Tamara uncovers a major family secret.
    There is a decent plot (or three) hiding in all this mess. How Tamara and her mother recover from the suicide of their father/husband, and return to some sort of normalcy would make a good story in itself. The secrets of the Kilsaney family and how their castle came to burn down provide enough intrigue and plot twists for a good book. Tamara’s change and maturation from a spoiled, tempestuous teen to a young woman who thinks of others and may have found happiness (and a boyfriend) in a small Irish village could also have been developed into a decent book. But all these plot lines and magical elements seem to have been thrown together without thought. Instead of a hearty stew that melds different ingredients into a delicious and substantial dish, we get a slop jar of leftovers.

    I give it two stars because 1) there were parts of the story that I found interesting and engaging and 2) Ali Coffey did a good job of the audio version. I don’t think I’d recommend the book to anyone, and, although I know Ahern is a very popular author with several bestsellers to her credit, I’m not interested in reading anything else by her.
  • (4/5)
    As with Ms Ahern's other books, I enjoyed the book overall. She's an engaging storyteller. But as a mystery story, I felt the book fell a bit short mainly because I didn't feel there were enough clues concerning the mystery woven into the story. There was a lot of odd behavior and statements about things not feeling right, but that's not the same as weaving clues about the mystery throughout the storyline.
  • (4/5)
    This is a becomming an adult book. The main charcter is at that cusp of adulthood, never had to take responsability and living a rather shallow life, when the dealth of her father and her mothers inability to cope leads her away from all of that to a place where she must do something.I likes the book (diary) that writes tommorows entries for her, it give it a mysterious air, but does not take over and make it a supernatural book. Not certain that I like the ending - but then I dont like what happens in life sometimes
  • (2/5)
    Not at all what I had hoped it to be. It is not a bad book but I do not know, if you've read her other books this one disappoints. I also thought the end was a bit far fetched and the start too slow.
  • (3/5)
    Tamara is a rich spoiled brat, used to summers in Marbella and jetting to London to go shopping. Then her real estate tycoon father commits suicide, leaving Tamara and her mother poor and homeless. Grieving, they move in with Tamara's aunt and uncle--Rosaleen and Arthur, who live in a gatehouse on a ruined country estate. Everyone acts weirdly, secrets abound, and when we finally find out the truth it comes as no surprise. The title refers to a diary Tamara finds in which she can read what tomorrow holds.
    This held my interest but ultimately was a let down.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this! What started off as a fish-out-of-water story, I was slowly drawn in to Tamara's life and her confusion about what was happening around her. I loved the characters and the growing sense of fear and claustrophobia that Rosaleen causes. The ending was great, and while some of the plot elements seemed a bit too convenient, I didn’t want to put this down. A genuine surprise.
  • (2/5)
    I don't generally finish books that I'm not enjoying (which is why I don't rate anything super-low), so I enjoyed this enough to finish it, however, I'm ultimately disappointed in it. I'm going with 2 stars, but it's really closer to 2.5 stars for me.

    I think that some of the elements of the plot and the characters are heavy-handed -- you see some things coming a mile away, but on the other hand, some things were completely glossed over.

    And the end is like...like the author got tired of the story and just decided to hand in her short synopsis of what was really going on and oh, by the way, here's out it all turned out in the end, K, THX, BYE.

    This was particularly disappointing because the premise was so interesting.
  • (4/5)
    This is the first book I read by Cecelia Ahern and I absolutely thought it was a treat. With mystery and a bit of magic this page turning novel left me wanting more from Ahern. She is a master at telling a great story, teasing you page by page with bits of intriguing information, all the while sending you a wild goose chase to solve the mystery. Oh, what fun!This story is about a mother and daughter forced to move away from everything that they know due to the father/husbands suicide and his previous bad business decisions. Away in the county with her strange Aunt and Uncle, Tamara's life changes in ways she never dreamed when a large leather bound book with a locked gold clasp from a traveling library comes into her possession. What does the book contain? How does it change her life? Read THE BOOK OF TOMORROW to find out! You will not regret it. The book was just released in paperback on July 24th, 2012. A great book club pick! 4.5 stars!
  • (5/5)
    When Tamara’s father commits suicide it renders her mother incapable of much. He also rendered their accounts in the red and the bank took the house in debt payment. They must break down their treasures and move from Dublin to the miniscule house owned by Arthur and Rosaleen, Jennifer’s relations in the country.Things are odd and become odder as the novel reveals that there is much to be learned in the hills of Ireland. Tamara, a spoiled brat who is NOT happy with her current situation sets out to try to find things to do and to especially annoy Rosaleen who couldn’t be nice if she was given a million dollars. Arthur seems well meaning but basically has not clue as to the depths of Rosaleen’s thoughts. Then comes a traveling library and Tamara notices a huge book, locked in fact and she must check it out. After getting it open she is amazed to see blank pages! But she doesn’t really want to write her thoughts down as it’s too depressing. She needn’t worry – in the morning when she opens the book the day’s activities are already accounted for. Before they happen.I didn’t like this story at first, I wanted to pop Tamara and tell her to get a grip but, after putting it aside for a couple of days - Oh my! I fell in love with this book and did not want to put it down (alas, work intervened!). Excellent writing, above excellent plot and a cast of characters to love, hate and like. What could be better?
  • (1/5)
    I initially jumped at the idea of reading this book, based on this synopsis from the back cover, " Lonely and bored, Tamara's sole diversion is a traveling library. There she finds a large leather bound book with a gold clasp and padlock, but no author name or title. Intrigued she pries open the lock, and what she finds takes her breath away - for what is written inside is not only impossible and magical...it's her future." Sounds like a perfect book to me. What I discovered however lacked the motivation to get me through reading one boring page after another.So many times, I set this one aside trying to find a reason to pick it up and finish it, much like a meal I know I should eat, but because it lacks in flavor, I find it difficult to attempt a second time. However, pushing through each chapter was lacking in what drives a reader to continue reading. I found it lacked in virtually every area.The book begins with the suicide of Tamara Goodwin's father who left the father piled in debt and now is being forced out of their home when it's foreclosed on. Rather than face his responsibilities, he took his own life, leaving Tamara and her mother, who lived in an opulent and luxurious lifestyle now forced to living with her aunt and uncle who don't seem to care much other than it's their duty to take family in. Her Uncle speaks in mucus snorts, nods and grunts and her Aunt is so completely consumed in her OCD world, that Tamara is forced to find something to do outside of the home. She is snobby, spoiled and is very vocal on her displeasure with how her life turned out. Your typical spoiled rich girl losses everything and now has to deal with life, type of story.Her mother is consumed with despair at losing her husband, unbelief that he left them destitute and is now residing with her family to make ends meet. She doesn't seem to care that she still has a daughter who needs her care other than finding them a place to live. Tamara's reckless lifestyle before all this happened with promiscuous sexual encounters, drinking and party's with her rich and wealth friends, made me want to leave this book sitting on the nearest counter and hope never to pick it up again. The only good thing about this particular book was it did end. However that being said, there are some readers that would probably enjoy this book, but for me, this one did not appeal to the book lover in me. I was hoping for more, considering I did enjoy this author's novel, P.S. I Love You but it wasn't something I enjoyed at all.I received The Book of Tomorrow by Cecelia Ahern compliments of William Morrow, a division of Harper Collins Publishers for my honest review and I'd have to rate this one a 1 out of 5 stars based on my own personal standards listed on my book review criteria. Readers may be warned that this book does contains strong language and sexual content. I would also caution you that you might want to check out other reviews before making a decision to read this book. Remember that not all books appeal to all types of readers and it's hard when I have to make a tough decision like this to write an honest review based solely on my own personal opinion of what I thought of the novel.