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Chicken Little

Chicken Little

Écrit par Steven Kellogg

Raconté par Helen Hunt et Hank Azaria


Chicken Little

Écrit par Steven Kellogg

Raconté par Helen Hunt et Hank Azaria

évaluations:
4.5/5 (7 évaluations)
Longueur:
7 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1998
ISBN:
9780545708708
Format:
Livre audio

Description

'This is the classic story of Chicken Little and her bird-brained friends who think the sky is falling.
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1998
ISBN:
9780545708708
Format:
Livre audio


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Ce que les gens pensent de Chicken Little

4.3
7 évaluations / 7 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    You know, I never liked the more traditional versions of this tale. But this one (very subtly, in the midst of all the hilarity) reveals the vulnerability of crowds to delusions, a special kind of mob mentality. So, good lesson. But, again, mostly funny. A reliable author; I love his books about big numbers and just about everything else I've encountered by him. Gotta see if there's more that I'm missing....
  • (3/5)
    This was a very cute little book. The story is about a chicken who one day experienced something falling from the sky. Well, he thought the sky was falling! So after explaining to all his friends Henry Penny, Cocky Locky, Ducky Lucky, and Goosey Loosey. His friends decided to go along with him to tell the king. Come to find out, it was an acorn that fell on his tail!
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this story and found it very entertaining to read. I liked the allitiration in the names of the characters. Names such as "Hippo Hefty," were fun to read because it flows nicely. The rhyming names like "Foxy Loxy," also flowed and added humor to the book. Another reason I liked this book was the thought bubbles given to Foxy Loxy. These thought bubbles said what he wanted to do and the future scene he saw in his head. I liked that aspect of the book because it gave foreshadowing to future events and showed the character traits of Foxy Loxy. The main message of this story is to be cautious of strangers and be careful when you warn people without being sure.
  • (4/5)
    As a teacher, Steven Kellog was one of my favorite illustrators, and this retelling and illustrating of the classic story, Chicken Little, doesn't disappoint! This book had me smiling all the way through! Very cute :)
  • (5/5)
    a fun, modern twist to an old tale. It's fun to read, once more with amazing illustrations.
  • (4/5)
    Chicken Little is a classic traditional fantasy book. The characters in this book consist of a dim-witted chicken, a hen, one duck, two geese, a turkey, a hungry fox and a fat hippo. The predictable element in this story is the line, “The Sky is falling, the sky is falling.” As Chicken Little skipped down the road and passed under an oak tree he was hit on the head by an acorn. His reaction, “HELP! HELP! THE SKY IS FALLING.” As Chicken Little relays the message to his friends, they too become panicked. As all of this is taking place, ol’ Foxy Loxy is planning a way to capture the feathered creatures for dinner. A common element in traditional fantasy stories is a hungry fox or wolf and I am glad to report he remains hungry!The story reminds me strongly of my childhood. I hate to date myself but I had this story on record. I used to play it over and over and just laugh. Reading the story now takes me back to my old room and makes me feel five all over again. It is neat to be able to share something that I liked as a child with my own children.As classroom extension ideas, I would use this book in a couple of ways. First, I think it would neat to use this story in a study of common elements in traditional fantasy books. This book reminds me of Little Red Riding Hood and The Three Little Pigs. They all have hungry wolves or a hungry fox and they all have the word little in their titles. It would be neat to show students the comparisons and see what other elements they can find in common from the books. I also think it would be fun to do a making words activity with this book. We could use the word Chicken Little and see how many words the students can make using the letters in the title. This would be a good spelling lesson. I can name a few words we could make: Like, kite, hit, tile, lint etc.
  • (5/5)
    This story is about a fox that tries to capture a group of birds to eat. He watches as Chicken Little walks by and an acorn falls from a tree above right onto her head. Chicken Little thinks the sky is falling, so while crying for help, Foxy Loxy gets ready to pounce on Chicken Little. But then, Henny Penny comes and listens to Chicken Little. Each time Foxy Loxy is about to pounce, another bird-related character arrives at the scene. The fox tries to fool them by dressing up as a police officer and throws them in his truck. When he tosses the acorn in the air after explaining to Chicken Little that it was what hit her on the head, the acorn jams the propeller on a helicoptor and Seargent Hippo Hefty parachutes down and catches Foxy Loxy. The story ends with Chicken Little planting that acorn in her yard and years later telling her story to her grandchildren.I really liked this version of Chicken Little. I had only seen the Disney version of it and was not impressed, so I wasn’t really excited about reading this book. However, Kellogg’s version was much better and clever. It is really funny how the fox imagines all the bird-characters as poultry; Goosey Lucy, Turkey Lurkey, Henny Penny, etc. My children will like this story, but being so young (2 and 3) I don’t think they will get the humor behind it. Discussion is always a good extension to a book. The class could talk about whether it is possible or not for the sky to be falling. They could discuss what they would do if they were Chicken Little and felt something hit their head, or if they were one of the other characters who heard Chicken Little cry for help. Another idea would be to have the students create their own “wanted” posters of Foxy Loxy and let them describe him in their own words.