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The Hobbit

The Hobbit

Écrit par J.R.R. Tolkien

Raconté par Ensemble Cast


The Hobbit

Écrit par J.R.R. Tolkien

Raconté par Ensemble Cast

évaluations:
4.5/5 (661 évaluations)
Longueur:
4 heures
Sortie:
Feb 17, 2009
ISBN:
9781598874495
Format:
Livre audio

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Description

The original American dramatization as broadcast on National Public Radio.

Bilbo Baggins, a gentle hobbit who loves the comforts of home, reluctantly joins a company of dwarves on a journey to recover plundered gold from a fierce dragon. It's a tale of high adventure and astonishing courage—and a magical prelude to the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Sortie:
Feb 17, 2009
ISBN:
9781598874495
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre

À propos de l'auteur

J.R.R. TOLKIEN (1892–1973) is the creator of Middle-earth and author of such classic and extraordinary works of fiction as The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. His books have been translated into more than fifty languages and have sold many millions of copies worldwide.


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4.5
661 évaluations / 545 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    "There is more in you of good than you know [...] Some courage and some wisdom, blended in measure. If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world."
    This was a fun adventure, and I really enjoyed it! While not my favorite children's fantasy, it was a fantastic introduction into Tolkien's world, and I am very excited to explore it more in his adult works.
  • (4/5)
    What can I say that hasn't already been said about "The Hobbit?" This edition, however, is well bound and includes Tolkien's own illustrations.
  • (5/5)
    For optimal pleasure, read this book out loud to a group of young children. Excellent in every way!
  • (5/5)
    Another set text. This is like the foreword of LOTR. If you like a magical epic journey about bravery and friendship, this is the one book you are looking for.
  • (5/5)
    What can one say? A charming children's book for adults, with hints of darker things to come in the Lord of the Rings trilogy.
  • (5/5)
    I'm generally not a big fan of sci-fi/fantasy works, but I enjoyed the literature AND the performance of the audio-book version immensely.
  • (5/5)
    FAB!!! One of my favourites...
  • (3/5)
    Short simple entertaining fantasy novel. ( a bit over rated but )
  • (3/5)
    Well it was what everyone told me it would be. Not Lord of the Rings, but something else that's just ok. When I think about this book as a separate entity to the Lord of the Rings series, it's still a solid fantasy story. The only problem is, I only picked this up because I missed Lord of the Rings. The Hobbit doesn't necessarily give me the relief I was looking for. I only felt let down that I wasn't reading about the characters I loved.
  • (5/5)
    Greatest story ever told.
  • (5/5)
    loved this book when i was about fourteen, recommended for all youngsters.
  • (4/5)
    Prequel to the Lord of the Rings trilogy, these books are written for a younger audience.
  • (4/5)
    A very different tone from Lord of the Rings, though clearly it prepares you for the trilogy. This edition, while beautiful, actually has some typographical errors.
  • (5/5)
    Probably one of my all time favourite books.
  • (3/5)
    This was a small paperback I read for English class during one of my years of high school. Quite good despite the very disappointing movie that was made of it.
  • (5/5)
    Decent illustration, quality binding,
  • (4/5)
    I must have spent my childhood and adolescence skim-reading most of the literature I was introduced to, gaining impressionist pictures of those works but missing much of the subtlety of language, characterisation and narrative. Having taken it on myself to begin re-reading those books with more attentiveness, 'The Hobbit' is one of those I've chanced on.The first insight I got is that Tolkien's prose changes from whimsical to saga-like over the course Bilbo's journey there and back again. Despite the revisions he made to two subsequent editions (I read the most common 1966 third edition), the avuncular approach he takes at the opening, very reminiscent of the tone of the posthumously published 'The Father Christmas Letters', sits ill at ease with descriptions of casualities in battle and the more serious and earnest language at the end; revisions clearly haven't reconciled the two approaches.The next insight was a reminder from studies I'd previously read of how 'The Hobbit' could be viewed retrospectively as a practice run for 'The Lord of the Rings'. The plot and narrative elements are similar, among them being the hobbit on a quest, fellowship, troll glade, Rivendell, mountain tunnels, Gollum, Gandalf's disappearance, wood elves, spiders, beseiged habitations, climactic battle near a desolate mountain, intervention by eagles, and the giving up of a precious object. There are numerous differences, of course, but by the time Tolkien came to the trilogy he was clearly determined to make the secondary world he'd created more coherent and more fleshed out without simply retelling 'The Hobbit'. But he clearly didn't want to jettison the arc of the storyline that had pleased him in the earlier tale, which means that the inherent conflicts in storytelling style of 'The Hobbit' are made even more obvious. The rather perfunctory ending contrasts with the solemn and more satisfying conclusion of 'The Lord of the Rings' describing the Scouring of the Shire and the Ringbearers' final journey.This edition features Tolkien's own rather quaint illustrations. While no-one would claim that there was huge artistry involved (the line drawings in particular are not well finished) their stylisation and frequent symmetry add to the otherworldly character of the tale and help inform us of Tolkien's creative intentions in structuring the narrative.We come now to the songs with which Tolkien peppers the text. There is much to admire in his cunning alliterations, rhymes and use of metre, modelled on Middle and Old English examplars, and I don't want to deny the artistry involved. But, like his drawings, their formality is, for me at least, a barrier to really liking them, and I am perplexed by his suggestions that elves, dwarves and goblins were able to improvise such crafted songs on the spur of the moment. However, these songs would benefit from being set to modal melodies in a folk or medieval style; I am not a fan of the Donald Swann settings but, as Tolkien likes to appeal to the senses, including sympathetically composed melodic counterparts to the verses could add immeasurably to this reader's enjoyment. 'The Hobbit' is certainly not a masterpiece. A pioneering work, yes, that broke the mould for children's literature and created a template for much post-war fantasy writing; and though flawed definitely a thrilling adventure story that flies once it gets off the ground.
  • (5/5)
    I love this classic. Bilbo Baggins is taken from his quiet home in the Shire to find out the nature of a shiny object with a strange power. He ends up going on a quest with his friends to follow the guidance of the Wizard Gandolf. Gandolf helps him become a well-repected hero who longs for adventure. There are hobbit s, elves, magic, and don't forget dragons! A must-read, even after the movie.-Breton W Kaiser Taylor
  • (3/5)
    My 8th grade son loves all things Tolkien. He’s been after me to read the Lord of the Rings triolgy forever even though I’ve told him multiple times that I don’t care for fantasy. Plus, I’ve seen all of the LOTR movies and I didn’t understand a single thing that happened in any of them.I agreed to read The Hobbit as a compromise, primarily because it’s shorter and would take away less of my reading time. I wanted to read at least a little something by Tolkien because I thought it was really sweet of him to want to share books he loved with me. He was really excited when I told him I’d read The Hobbit.I’m sorry to say that reading it did not make me like fantasy more. I really liked the parts with Gollum but I found the rest confusing and it just didn’t hold my interest very well. I found myself putting it down for long stretches at a time. Regardless, I’m glad I read The Hobbit so that I have a better idea of what Tolkien is all about. I also like being able to talk about books with my son since we’re both big readers.He recently had to read To Kill a Mockingbird for school. I reread it myself so that we could discuss it. That’s much more my speed and luckily, he liked it too.I know I’m in a very small minority of people who don’t love Tolkien. If you like fantasy, you should probably read this book.
  • (5/5)
    I had forgotten how chatty Tolkien's narrator was, much more suitable for children or early teens (considering the content).
  • (4/5)
    Although at first I was not a fan of the style of writing, I eventually grew to enjoy this book. I enjoyed Bilbo and his adventures and was happy to see him safely home. Yes I am a day early finishing for #lotrchapteraday but I just couldn't help myself at the end. I will hold off for a day to start up the next book though to get back on track. 🌟🌟🌟🌟
  • (4/5)
    I'm a little ashamed that it took me this long to read The Hobbit. I actually read the entire Lord of the Rings trilogy in a week during one summer in high school. Admittedly, after being obsessed with the movies. (Mmmm Legolas!) However, I just never got around to this little (ha!) prequel until now.The Hobbit definitely seemed like a much quicker read. I was expecting to pore over this one for a while as I had pretty much spent that week in high school glued to the couch, reading during every waking moment. (Non-waking moments were full of dreams about kicking Gimli off the horse and snuggling Orlando Bloom-elf into Gondor.) I almost felt like it was rushed, even though there was a lot of action involved. Perhaps, this is because we follow Bilbo, the thirteen dwarves, and Gandalf for the whole story instead of having it split into groups of characters doing different tasks.It was definitely fun to adventure back into Middle Earth in a less Sauron-y time. It featured new creatures like trolls, goblins, gross spiders, and wood elves, but still had the beloved Gollum along the way. (My precciiiiooouusss!) There were many moments of peril which kept the book exciting and fast-paced. Even though it was a long journey, the book glazed over the uneventful days to keep the story from dragging.What got me disappointed was that it was set up from the beginning that Bilbo was to kill the dragon, Smaug. Right? I mean, it seemed as though that was heavily alluded to throughout. Even one of the trailers for the movie seemed to foreshadow this. But - without extensive spoilers (although, if you haven't read or seen the movie and are going to get mad about any slight spoiler you're even more behind than me so get with the program!) - he doesn't. Sure he kind of plays a hand in it, but what the heck! Greatest underdog story ever wasted. Maybe Tolkien didn't want to overshadow Frodo, but poor Bilbo seemed to do most of the hard work with none of the reward. (Sure he got some reward, but not hero status!)Then, at the end it just kind of petered out to a boring way home (boring for the reader, relieving for Gandalf and Bilbo).While it wasn't as exciting as the trilogy (and lacked Legolas), it was still a short (ha! again), fun adventure. Besides my griping, I enjoyed it and now really want to not move from my couch for three days as I marathon all the movies.
  • (4/5)
    An old classic, but reading it again you can feel its age. Long sentences, and the perfect example of passive writing and how it can exhaust the reader. I read this to my eldest son (11yo), and he enjoyed it because he had seen the movies - because having seen them he was able to follow the long-winded story better, and Tolkien's very long way of telling something. To be honest, I think the movies did the story justice, bringing it to life in a way the novel wants to do, but struggles to in the modern day. Still a very enjoyable read.
  • (5/5)
    Bilbo is a hobbit from the far-away land called Hobbiton. He, like all hobbits, hate adventures and big active moments, so when the dwarves and the wizard Gandalf came and took him out, he was a bit out of his depths around them!

    The dwarves need a burglar, and Gandalf the wizard tells them that he knows a good burglar...Bilbo! Bilbo is asked to help them claim the treasure Smaug the dragon is sitting on, as it used to belong to the dwarves. It is dangerous and bone-grinding adventure, but Bilbo does it!

    Scared and frightened but being very optimistic, Bilbo goes on the huge adventure and gets into all sorts of trouble and mischief! He changes from being timid to very brave. Whenever the dwarves were in trouble, he would go and save them; when he needed to go into the cave of Smaug, he did, and without question, either.

    This book was brilliant, but I think for my sort of age it's a bit long. Though it is so, I like how J.R.R. made his own fantastic pictures of Hobbiton and the elves. His imagination really flows and this book is so good and highly recommended!

    Want to find out about cute little Bilbo Baggins the hobbit? You'll have to find this great read on your shelf - it just has to be there!

    Wonderfully well-written book, little characters with their own adorable personalities, lovely, lovely pictures J.R.R. drew himself - it is a great must-read!
  • (4/5)
    A respectable person-creature goes on an adventure in a fantasy world.4/4 (Great).It's too long, and the politics-oriented second half gets a little tedious compared with the fairy-tale adventures of the first half. But if it were two books, the first one would be one of my favorites.
  • (5/5)
    Full of excitement.awesome!

  • (5/5)
    What can I say-- one of my favorite books. I have read it multiple times. If you've only seen the movie--READ THIS!! It's much more exciting.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! I had been meaning to read it for years and never got to it. I think what I loved most, is that it was narrated in a way that made me feel as though someone was telling me a story. It just had a different feel to it. I will admit though, the movie had a lot more to it and I found there was a lot in the movie(s) I missed out on in the book. This book definitely has a lot more singing in it though! Who knew elves, dwarves and goblins were so musical?
    I still believe it is a full 5 star read though and am looking forward to continuing the series 😀
  • (5/5)
    Tolkien was an absolute genius. The Hobbit was well written, made you feel you were apart of the adventure. I absolutely loved this book. I'd read it again and again, it really keeps you at the edge of your seat never wanting to put the book down.
  • (5/5)
    The Hobbit is such a charming, delightful novel. The language is somewhat advanced, but strong readers should fall in love with this book. I would recommend it for any student that loves fantasy-- particularly those in grades 5 and above.