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Spoon

Spoon


Spoon

évaluations:
4.5/5 (16 évaluations)
Longueur:
6 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9780545467513
Format:
Livre audio

Description

Spoon has always been a happy little utensil. But lately he feels like life is just not cutting it. Fork, Knife and Chopsticks all have it so much better than Spoon. But do they? This book celebrates what makes each of us special.

Sortie:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9780545467513
Format:
Livre audio


À propos de l'auteur

Amy Krouse Rosenthal is the bestselling author of Little Pea, Little Oink, Duck! Rabbit!, Spoon, Cookies: Bite Size Life Lessons as well as Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life for adults. She is the creator of a performance art movie called "The Beckoning of Lovely" in which lots of strangers do things together (see www.thebeckoningoflovely.wordpress.com), is a frequent contributor on NPR, notably "Writers Block Party" on Chicago Public Radio, and is at work on many other books. See also Amy's website at www.whoisamy.wordpress.com. Amy lives with her family in Chicago, IL.

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Ce que les gens pensent de Spoon

4.4
16 évaluations / 13 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    A little spoon feels blue about his lack of excitment in his life. He cant hel but compare the exciting lifes of his friends, knife, fork and chopsticks. What he doesnt know is that his friends feel the same way, "Spoon" is an excellent book to teach about what makes eachone of us special.
  • (5/5)
    Spoon (2009) written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and illustrated by Scott Magoon, has been nominated for the Colorado Children's Book Award for 2013. This is a wonderfully charming story about Spoon as he discovers just what makes him special. I'd use this as a writing prompt to get kids to write about what makes them special. Also, dialogue is used wonderfully in this story, making it a great example to model how to effectively use dialogue in stories. Grades K-5.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely adore this book. Love, love, love it!!! Explains why spoons are so cool!
  • (3/5)
    It's a very simple story about a young spoon who wishes his life were a bit more glamorous, lol. The text is short and declarative - it'd be great for a toddler storytime. The illustrations are this book's saving grace - the spoon is so sweetly sincere, the chopsticks so glamorous, the knife looks kind of aggressive and tough, etc. The spoon family portrait is also very cute, with the "spork" off to the side looking dejected. An amusing conceit for a book!
  • (5/5)
    The cover of this book begs you to pick it up and read it! The drawings of Spoon, his family, and the other utensils are too cute to resist. Short, sweet, and with an underlying message of self-acceptance and motherly love, this book is just darling.
  • (5/5)
    Ok, so it's an old message, been done almost to death. But the details! I read this in the library and burst out laughing at the chopsticks being cool and exotic" doing the tango. The 'Chinese' chopsticks, doing the 'Brazilian' tango, you see. And of course it's all about finding your particular strengths, not getting uptight about your particular weaknesses... and what can Spoon do best? "Spoon" (cuddle with mom and dad Spoon), of course!"
  • (5/5)
    Spoon is a book about a little spoon who learns to appreciate his abilities and talents rather than being jealous of his friends, chopsticks and fork. After all, he gets to stir tea and his friend knife will probably never know that experience.I love this book. It's a wonderful story that promotes self-esteem and self-love in a cute way that appeals to kids. Maybe a kid can't help someone eat soup with their head, but they could kick a ball really far or tell you all the state capitals. And that's an important thing to know about yourself.
  • (5/5)
    This book goes through the life and identity crisis of a spoon. The spoon realizes that he cannot do everything that other utensils can do. I thought it was very interesting how the illustrator created the image of how utensils can be like people. When the forks are getting spaghetti off of the plate, it makes it look like a person using their extremities to accomplish a goal. It brings me back to when I used to imagine inanimate objects could move and talk. This book explores how someone can acknowledge that not everyone is good at everything, and that we might get jealous of each other at times. The big picture of this book is to remember that we have our own talents and strengths. The spoon eventually realizes that other utensils can not do what he can do, so he can acknowledge that everyone has strengths.
  • (5/5)
    The book "Spoon" by Amy Krouse Rosenthal was about Spoon who is jealous of his friends. He says that Chopsticks are exotic and fun, Fork gets to stab things, Knife gets to cut things, and none of them ever get dizzy from stirring drinks. The main message is about self-acceptance and realizing your own great qualities and attributes. He realizes he has a great life when he talks to his mom so another main message is about family and how they are supportive. This book is amazing due to it's great main message. I recommend it to 1st or 2nd graders who are struggling with their self and identity. It is difficult for students this young to realize how great they are when they are so busy focusing on what others have and get to do.
  • (4/5)
    Similar in style to Krouse's other works (Little Pea and Little Hoot). Takes a unique look at the life of a little spoon - who is sad he does not have the same skills or attributes as his friends. He is reminded by his mother of all the unique things he can do.

    Illustrations are cute.
  • (5/5)
    This picture book is one of my favorite finds recently. Spoon sees what all the other utensils gets to do, but look what all he gets to do! This is a great read for all ages to see that though others have different talents, they are unique and special in their own way!
  • (5/5)
    Spoon by Amy Krouse Rosenthal predates Spork by Kyo Maclear and there are obvious similarities. Both explore ethnicity, family, and self esteem through the world of the silverware drawer.Spoon is just that, a spoon. He's a soup spoon that also likes cereal and ice cream. He though has noticed that knives, forks and chopsticks all get to do things he can't. He becomes so focused on their special talents that he begins to doubt his own.What Spoon doesn't realize, but his mother does, is that the forks, knives and chopsticks recognize his talents just as he recognizes theirs. She eventually gets to explain that to him and it ends happily with some family snuggling.While my daughter picked up on the self acceptance message, she had more fun pointing out all the different utensils. She's used to our own strange jumble of old and new utensils (including chopsticks). The utensils in Krouse's book are a similar jumble.
  • (4/5)
    An appealing picture-book exploration of the idea that "the grass is always greener on the other side," Amy Krouse Rosnethal's Spoon is the story of a young utensil who longs to be more like his friends. Knife gets to do exciting things like cut, Fork travels to interesting places, and Chopsticks are considered "cool and exotic." How can a simple spoon compete? Of course Knife, Fork and Chopsticks have their own ideas about what is desirable, and Spoon eventually sees the wisdom in his mother's assurance that he too has some wonderful tasks to perform.Young readers will identify with Spoon's wistful longing to be somebody else, and find comfort in his mother's reassurance that he is someone special. Scott Magoon's whimsical illustrations skillfully convey the emotion of the story, and are the perfect counterpart to the simple but perceptive narrative. Rosenthal seems to be building a body of work that addresses common childhood concerns with sensitivity and humor, and I look forward to reading more of her work. I do wonder why it is that spoons, peas (Little Pea), owls (Little Hoot), and pigs (Little Oink) all seem to be boys in the author's imaginative landscape, but will hope that the feminine will enter the picture at some point.