Découvrez votre prochain livre audio préféré

Devenez membre dès aujourd'hui et écoutez gratuitement pendant 30 jours
Lon Po Po

Lon Po Po

Écrit par Ed Young

Raconté par B. D. Wong


Lon Po Po

Écrit par Ed Young

Raconté par B. D. Wong

évaluations:
4/5 (66 évaluations)
Longueur:
13 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2006
ISBN:
9780545521239
Format:
Livre audio

Description

In this Chinese version of the classic fairy tale, a mother leaves her three children home alone while she goes to visit their grandmother. When the children are visited by a wolf, pretending to be their Po Po, or granny, they let him in the house, but ultimately are not fooled by his deep voice and hairy face. Combining ancient Chinese panel art techniques with a contemporary palette of watercolors and pastels, this powerful story brings lessons about strangers, trust and courage to a new generation.
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2006
ISBN:
9780545521239
Format:
Livre audio

À propos de l'auteur

Ed Young was born in China and spent his childhood in Shanghai. The illustrator of many books for children, he has received numerous awards, including a Caldecott Medal for his book Lon Po Po, and two Caldecott Honors for The Emperor and the Kite and Seven Blind Mice. He was twice nominated for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal, the highest international recognition given to children's book authors and illustrators who have made a lasting contribution to children's literature. Ed Young lives in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.


Lié à Lon Po Po

Livres audio associé

Avis

Ce que les gens pensent de Lon Po Po

4.1
66 évaluations / 71 Avis
Qu'avez-vous pensé ?
Évaluation : 0 sur 5 étoiles

Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    A Chinese folk tale similar to the story of "Little Red-Riding Hood." A wolf arrives at the door of three children, home alone, and impersonates their grandmother to get inside with hopes of eating them. The children use wit and tricks to out-smart the wolf.I enjoy this story, especially because it's the children that prevail against the wolf through their own efforts. It also shows how tradition tales can be both similar and different across different cultures.The artwork is reflective of Chinese panel art, and is done with pastels and watercolour (according to the book jacket) and is a winner of the Caldecott Medal for illustration. The art can be eerie at times, and adds a mythical quality. One page in particular could represent both the tree and the wolf.
  • (4/5)
    This is a Chinese version of Little Red Riding Hood. Three sisters stay home alone while their mother visits their grandmother. While they're home alone, the wolf comes to the door pretending to be their grandmother. The girls let the wolf in the house and the oldest sister slowly realizes it's not their grandmother. The sisters use their wits to figure out a way to get the wolf before it gets them.
  • (5/5)
    If you enjoy retellings of traditional folk tales, this is an excellent book. Lon Po Po won the Caldocott deservedly. When the mom leaves her 3 daughters overnight, she warns them to lock up. As in the story of Little Red Riding Hood, the wolf tries to trick Shang, Tao, and Paotze. The 3 sisters are able to trick the wolf by the end of the story.
  • (4/5)
    A different twist on the classic bad wolf tale.
  • (4/5)
    Young's translation of this folktale gives the story of Red-Riding Hood a lovely twist. No longer does the woodcutter (who isn't even in the story) save Red (or, in this case, three young sisters). No, it is their own cleverness and cooperation that saves the day. Young's translation is simple enough for young readers, but engaging enough for adults. There is no sense that the story is dumbed-down for kids. But it is the illustrations that set this book apart. Young's style is similar to the soft watercolors of the Impressionist, and gives the story a dynamic and other-worldly tone, just perfect for a fairy tale. Soft, somber tones, watery brush-strokes, and swirling atmosphere set this book apart. Recommend for young readers, particularly young girls.
  • (2/5)
    This book is the Chinese version of the classic fairy tale, Little Red Riding Hood. There are three children in the book and they are left alone at their house while their mother goes to visit their sick grandmother. A wolf comes to the house and pretends to be their grandmother. When the children finally realize that their "grandmother" is actually a wolf, they play a trick on the wolf and bring it down to it's final demise.
  • (5/5)
    As with mythology, folk tales have a way of entering into the public consciousness in a way that we as yet don't fully understand, whether it be through some form of collected consciousness or some basic human understanding that makes the grander themes of these tales common across the globe, we constantly find similar yet unique versions of the the same story no matter where we go.In this case, we have the Chinese version of the Little Red Riding Hood tale, common themes with a very different execution. Here, the wolf comes to the children, but there is still a visit to grandma and a trick on the part of the wolf.I can still remember the episode of Reading Rainbow that recommended this book. Definitely worth a read, and another one of the books I'm revisiting from my childhood.
  • (5/5)
    A beautiful book with gorgeous and dramatic illustrations. A great book to introduce the concept of the power of illustration / art in books. The story follows the basic Little Red Riding Hood tale, incorporating sibling connection, and the cleverness and strength inherent in working together. Might be a little scary for some kindergarteners. A fabulous read!
  • (5/5)
    This book is a twist on the typical Little Red Riding Hood Story, set in China. In it the children trick the wolf to save their lives. It focuses on obedience, problem solving, cleverness, and working together. It also has an ambiance of terror and fright. I think that children would really enjoy Lon Po Po, especially in lower grades. Children who like scary stories, twists on "typical" fairytales, as well as intense pictures would love this book.
  • (5/5)
    This book is filled with beautiful watercolor paintings and is the Chinese story of Red Riding Hood. This would be good to talk to children about stories across different cultures and to show them different types of art work within stories.
  • (4/5)
    4starPAges 4 to 8Artistic Media: watercolors, pastelsArtistic Style: impressionismCaldecott book. Three children left alone by their mother must defeat a wolf who passes off as their grandmother. No source note, but author is originally from China and apparently heard the story growing up. Art is beautiful and dark, although sometimes it might be hard to see what's going on (in terms of a storytime read-aloud).
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyed this different take on the Little Red Riding Hood story, with beautifully done illustrations (though some were a bit menacing, and might be a bit scary for children).
  • (4/5)
    When Shang, Tao and Paotze's mother leaves to visit their Po Po, or grandmother, she warns the three girls not to let anyone into the house. But a crafty wolf, observing her departure, soon presents himself at the door, masquerading as Po Po. When the sisters find themselves literally in bed with the wolf, they soon realize that they aren't snuggling up to Granny! But what can they do...?This Chinese variant of Little Red Riding Hood sees the wolf coming to the girl(s), rather than the other way around, and features a much less passive heroine than can be found in the Grimms. Oldest sister Shang can't afford to wait for a woodcutter to happen by, and rescue her - she knows that she must act, in order to protect Tao and Paotze! Ed Young's illustrations - which won him a Caldecott Medal - perfectly capture the eerie quality of this tale, and its rather gruesome conclusion. This is a real folktale, ably presented by Young, and readers both young and old should be aware that it has teeth! Very sensitive children may find it too frightening. But for those who relish a scary story, Lon Po Po fits the bill, while also providing an excellent example of comparative folklore, and the connections between cultures. Highly, highly recommended! Even the dedication - "To all the wolves of the world for lending their good name as tangible symbol for our darkness" - (which my goodreads friend Chandra also mentioned) is fabulous!
  • (4/5)
    This book is the Chinese adapted version on Little Red Riding Hood. It is a darker and more suspenseful version. This is a great book to show how different cultures make changes to the books and stories we are familiar with.
  • (5/5)
    In LonPoPo Mother leaves her three daughters home alone while she goes to visit the grandmother. A wolf shows up dressed as their grandmother and tricks his way into the house. The three daughters are smart however, and soon realize the wolf is not their grandmother. In the end the three daughters manage to outsmart the wolf. I thought this was an interesting version of the classic story of Little Red Riding Hood that so many children are already familiar with. I loved the illustrations, which were often very dark. These helped to set the tone of the story. Children could be taught about how there are many versions of different tales from around the world, and each different version reflects the culture that it comes from. A classroom project could be making their own versions of a classic story of their choice and putting something from their culture into the story. Children could also compare and contrast two different Little Red Riding Hood stories from different cultures.
  • (4/5)
    As the Caldecott medal suggests, this book is full of superb, well laid-out illustrations which are amazing in their own right. But, this book is also a great example of a classic story, in our culture, that has its own roots and interpretation in another culture. This Chinese rendition of the classic Brothers Grimm story of Little Red Riding Hood offers some interesting similarities and differences in terms of its story and cultural significance. Reading this story to students would open up some amazing opportunities to do lessons that focus on comparing and contrasting the stories from multiple perspectives.
  • (5/5)
    A twist n Red Riding Hood with elements of Chinese culture.
  • (4/5)
    Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China, written and illustrated by Ed Young is an interesting tale. The art does enhance the story but it does not go with the traditional focus. The artwork doesnot contain many traditional elements of chinese art such as calligraphy, distant landscapes, and monochromatic color schemes. Some of these elements are interpreted in a more modern way. For instance, the landscapes may be monochromatic but the girls in the book are brightly colored. Ed Young was born and raised in China. His artwork, although not traditional, does contain elements of his life in China. This would be an excellent book to use in a unit on Chinese culture.
  • (4/5)
    A classic Red Riding Hood tale from the Chinese. The illustrations are dark and set a much more appropriately foreboding mood.
  • (5/5)
    I thought this was an excellent rendition of the Little Red Ridinghood. In fact I like it even better because of how the three clever children trick the mean wolf instead of being eaten by him. I think that it way better than a little girl getting fooled and eaten.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting pictures, but a little scary for some.
  • (3/5)
    This book is a Chinese version of our Little Red Riding Hood. I like this variation becuase it has more of a trickery on the three sisiters part. The imposter Po Po which would be a grandma is let in bye the girls and in the midst of getting to sleep the oldest figures it out. They tell the fake Po Po they will pick her seed that grow on top of a tree. You have to read and find out what happens next!
  • (5/5)
    A Red Riding Hood Story from China. The wolf arrives to the house and gets inside but with some trickery from one of the three sisters they kill the wolf. The story has test of time, some state that this story has been told for thousands of years. The illustrations are done well, I believe with water color. The action of this book takes place mostly at night in a house and by a tree near the house at night. Illustrations match the story, the illustrations are dark and mysterious with room for surprise, action, and suspense. The wolf is drawn as a mysterious creature, not being able to see or recognize either much of the wolfs animal characteristics or human characteristics. My favorite part is the story but the illustrations do complement the story very well. Ages 6 and up.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:This story is based off of a Chinese tale like the European story Little Red Riding Hood. This story is thought to be over one thousand years old. A mother leaves her three daughters behind to go visit their grandma, but when she leaves a wolf next door decides to try and enter the house claiming to be their grandmother.Personal Reaction:I had heard the story Little Red Riding Hood, but not this version of it. I did like it and I also liked the pictures in the book, they are very colorful and well drawn.Classroom Extension Ideas:1. The pictures in this book are watercolors, So I would have the kids draw a picture related to this book using watercolors.2. Also another idea could be to have a dicussion on the Chinese culture.
  • (4/5)
    Chinese version of the little red riding hood. Great book to use for a comprehension strategy (questioning) lesson. The pictures are quite dull, boring, and scary. They aren't good pictures to keep a child's attention for long and are to dark and mysterious for a young child.
  • (4/5)
    The story is a retelling of the Chinese version of Little Red Riding Hood. The story is about a woman with three children. The women goes to the grandmother, Po Po, on her birthday, telling her children to lock the door and let no one answer. A wolf sees the mother leave and tricks the children into letting him enter. This book won the Caldecott Medal and has beautiful pastel and watercolor illustrations. Ed Young used the ancient Chinese panel art throughout the story. The book could be used for a unit on myths and folktales or also a unit on study of artists and types of art. I would recommend this book to others.
  • (5/5)
    Love the ancient Chinese panel art.
  • (4/5)
    In this realistic Chinese telling of Little Red Riding Hood, readers will bite their nails as they turn the pages to see if Shang can save her and her sisters from the evil wolf dressed as their grandmother. The illustrations demonstrate the darker nature of this version of the story.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderfully scary read aloud. The kids are riveted. Beautiful illustrations.
  • (4/5)
    In Lon Po Po, a mother leaves her three daughters to go visit Grandma. She tells them to lock the door and not to let in anyone. The Wolf, though, sees the mother leave, and disguises himself as Grandma. He fools the younger two daughters into letting him in and blows out the candle so no one can see him. The oldest daughter, though, figures out he is the wolf. She gets her sisters to climb a tree with her and then they convince the Wolf that he must come up to try the gingko nuts. The offer to put him in a basket and pull him up. They do so and then drop him to his death.Children will enjoy this tense and suspenseful tale that will remind them of little red riding hood. The language is straightforward and contains the questions we know from the other red riding hood story, like "Grandma, why are your claws so long?" With longer paragraphs on each page and a dark watercolor palette that elicits a sense of mystery and secretiveness, this book is better suited for grades 2-5.