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Math Curse

Math Curse

Écrit par Jon Scieszka

Raconté par Nancy Wu


Math Curse

Écrit par Jon Scieszka

Raconté par Nancy Wu

évaluations:
4.5/5 (56 évaluations)
Longueur:
14 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9780545467469
Format:
Livre audio

Description

One morning a little girl wakes up to find everything in life arranging itself into a math problem, and she must find her way out of the Math Curse!
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9780545467469
Format:
Livre audio

À propos de l'auteur

Jon Scieszka is the National Ambassador for Children's Literature emeritus and the bestselling author of more than twenty-five books for kids, including The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales, Math Curse, Robot Zot!, and the Time Warp Trio series. Jon founded Guys Read to encourage a passion for reading among young boys, with the philosophy that boys love to read most when they are reading things they love. A former elementary school teacher, Jon lives in Brooklyn with his family. For more great books, more great facts, and more about your favorite authors, head over to www.guysread.com. You'll be glad you did.


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4.3
56 évaluations / 86 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    I love books by Jon Scieszka. He is so clever, and manages to turn topics like science and math into pure laugh-out-loud fun, all the while surreptitiously teaching something to his readers.In this book, the young boy who narrates says he was “cursed” by his math teacher, “Mrs. Fibonacci.”[The Fibonacci sequence is a series of numbers in which you get to the next number by adding up the two numbers before it. For example, starting with 1 and adding it to get the next number, and then continuing in this way, you get: 1+1=2, 1+2=3, 2+3=5, 3+5=8, and so on. It’s a “thing” because, amazingly enough, you can see the Fibonacci pattern everywhere in nature, such as in more than 90 percent of plants in which multiple parts are arranged around a single stem.]As the story opens, Mrs. Fibonacci tells her students, “You know, you can think of almost everything as a math problem.”And that is exactly what the boy begins to do, in a way that always ends humorously. For example:“I take the milk out for my cereal and wonder: How many quarts in a gallon? How many pints in a quart? How many inches in a foot? How many feet in a yard? How many yards in a neighborhood? Haw many inches in a pint? How many feet in my shoes?”Or this:"1. Estimate how many M&Ms it would take to measure the length of the Mississippi River.2. Estimate how many M&Ms you would eat if you had to measure the Mississippi River with M&Ms.3. Bonus: Can you spell Mississippi without any M&Ms?"In the end, he finally gets free of the curse, only because math is suddenly no longer a “problem” for him.He announces:“‘I’ve broken the math curse. I can solve any problem.And life is just great until science class, whenMr. Newton says,‘You know, you can think of almost everything as a science experiment….’”Whimsical, cartoon-like illustrations by Lane Smith complement each page.To quote the author, this book is “for ages > 6 and < 99.”Evaluation: Like other books by this team, this one is both adorable and informative.
  • (5/5)
    We read this book in class but I had to read it again. The book was hysterical, made me realize so I freak out about my problems only in a math way. We never really realize how math affects our everyday life.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a friendly, funny way to introduce kids of all ages to higher mathematical concepts in a logical sequence.
  • (5/5)
    Fun and a little mind bending for a tired mommy after 9pm!
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. I think it would be great for any age because it brings elementary and more advanced concepts to life. It focuses on math anxiety and tackles it with humor. It shows that math doesn't have to be as scary as people think. A must have for any class!
  • (3/5)
    Mrs.Fibonacci told the whole class that there is math in everything. The next day that is all he could think about and it was driving him crazy! He thinks Mrs. Fibonacci put a curse on him because he sees math everywhere. While putting on his clothes, trying to buy a chocolate, and even in dinner. He thinks the curse will never end. This is a really cute book to get children interested in math and to even share in a math class. I think it is a funny book the kids will enjoy.
  • (5/5)
    Today in math class my teacher told us everything can be a problem. That's when I actually had a problem. Everything I do is now a problem. This book describes all his problems and makes them into a math problem for the reader to solve. This is a great and fun book to show in a math class. It will have the children doing math problem while reading a story. The style of the book is written in a unique way. Everything is a math problem from the price to the dedication page.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: A teacher tells one of her students that you can see math in everyday life. The student becomes stressed out regarding how complication and just how much math there is in everyday life. Personal Reaction: I wish I had read this when I was in grade school. Math was never my strong subject and I think this would have helped. The illustrations flowed well with the story and the story line itself took a complicated subject and brought humor to it. Classroom Extension:1) Have students create their own math problems regarding daily activities, create a worksheet and pass it out for the class to solve.2) Have students solve the math problems in the story.
  • (5/5)
    One students gets a math curse after their teacher told them that everything can be seen as a math problem. She starts to question everything and lots of math sample calculations turn up.A very recommendable book for children to make math interesting, rich in variety, close-to reality and colorful. It even captured me to solve all these math example since they are wonderfully thought and funny too.
  • (4/5)
    We read this book in the class and it felt like we was in a math class. We had to think logical and out of the box. I like this book and I would introduce this book to children who are in middle school. Some people has a fear in math, but once they get through this book they might just see math from a different point of view.
  • (4/5)
    I like this book because I'm a math person. I really loved how the author made everything a math problem, even the price of the book. THere was also a few riddles which was fun to solve.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a fun look at how math is used in everyday life and in everything we do. The illustrations are limited to a few pictures, but the math facts, which are lettered texts, does not take away the flow of the story. I would recommend this book in math to show how fun math can be when used in a different way.
  • (5/5)
    This book brilliantly gets kids smiling and laughing at the dry subject of math. We learn that math problems are in every second of our daily lives, and that we are quickly solving math problems without even thinking! This book could definately bring up children's confidence about math, and make them look at math in a different and fun way. This is a great example of how we can incorporate math lessons into literature.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a funny story but it's unique because it incorporates a bunch of equations that challenge all ages. This is a great book to review math that students may have learned or may not have learned yet. It helps the students to think about the answer without being hard on math. The class can work together to solve the math equations. Everyone in the class can help each other learn to solve the problems.
  • (4/5)
    Math curse like most John Scieszka books offers the reader a somewhat warped and humorous view of a topic, in this case math. With brilliant illustrations by Lane Smith, this book would be great for younger students, or as a class read along. However, due to the chaos presented in the book, sometimes the pages can be cluttered and certain students may have trouble focusing on the work.
  • (3/5)
    "Math Curse" is about a girl who wakes up frightened from a math curse. She can no longer solve any math problems and every even she encounters throughout her day seems to be a math problem. This book is a great example of how important math really is and how it is in our everyday lives, whether we like it or not. This book is great for young readers and I wish I would have read this book at a young age because I do not like math.
  • (4/5)
    After a student hears her teacher say, "You know, you can think of almost everything as a math problem," things get seriously complicated. All day, from breakfast to dinner the student stresses herself over math and how it is complicatedly involved in every aspect of her day. She finally escapes this mind set by freeing herself of the math curse. Unfortunately, after a good night's rest her teacher says, "You know, you can think of almost everything as a science experiment," which leads readers to think that this poor girl must now be involved in a science curse. This book is great because it light heartedly lets readers know that it is okay to find math to be confusing, because for the most part, it is. However, we can conquer this and embrace that it is such a big part of our daily lives. Reading this book before a new math concept is learned would be good. Also, it can easily be incorporated into various math lessons. Each page contains critical thinking word problems that students can read and then solve.
  • (5/5)
    Math is everywhere! I was teaching a lesson on designing sets and one student said, "Oh so this is one of those few times we will actually use math in our real lives?" If only they had read this book at a younger age. I was struck by how much math we are surrounded with on a daily basis. This book is excellent for teaching word problems. The text would allow for specific math problems to be pulled out and taught the key words to solving the problems. It's also great to see a book incorporating multiple subject area's to educate.
  • (5/5)
    Math Curse by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith is a great book because it teaches students about word problems and how they surround everything that we do. There is so many activities that teachers could do with their students from this book like give them word problems that they have actually do with blocks. Or you can give the students manipulative and they can create their own math problems. There is so many other fun activities that you could do with this book but these are just some of them. I would defiantly recommend teachers to read this book to their students because this is a fun and interesting way to teach students about math problems and how to solve them. I would defiantly read this book to my students because I think word problems are hard and I think the only way to help students learn about them is to make them fun and interesting and I think this book is a great way to do that.
  • (5/5)
    Clever book about math-anxiety. Exagerrated pictures and mathematical illustrations add to the story.
  • (4/5)
    When the wise and witty teacher exclaims that all almost anything can become a math problems the math curse begins for one of her students. For a whole day this math curse multiplies and manipulates her every thought and action. For every problem there is a solution! Until it's time for science class...
  • (4/5)
    When I first read this book I considered it a lower elementary book, but since I have read it to my 6th grade math students I think its a good book to read to higher elementary students. This is a fun reading book. Each page asks questions, which gets its readers to think. The fun reading text keeps the book from becoming too frightening when talking about math. Students who do not particularly like math should enjoy reading it, too. It's text connects math to things a student encounters every day in life. My class enjoyed answering the questions and the class made it into a math game.
  • (4/5)
    "Math Curse" is about a child that is literally cursed with math. The child sees everything as a math equation and begins to go crazy. The format of the book includes many math equations are both fun and applicable. In this way, "math Curse" could be a great way to introduce a math lesson or just get the class to think mathematically.
  • (5/5)
    Scieszka is at it again with a book that focuses on math problems and how they are evident in everyday life. It's a fun look at a child's struggle with math as the problems start to take over everything. Getting dressed, eating meals and drawing are all converted into a math problem. This idea (or curse as the student saw it) was given by the teacher, cleverly named Mrs. Fibonacci. Fractions and Venn diagrams are also covered and in the end the math problems are all solved with mastery of the rules being taught.
  • (4/5)
    A boy is learning math in class and suddenly everything he sees and thinks of in life becomes a math problem until finally he understands all the math skills. Good to use in a math class.
  • (4/5)
    You might not have realized that almost everything is a math problem until you've read this book. Everyone goes through math related problems everyday without knowing. This humorous story goes into details of a young girl going through what she believes is a math curse.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:One day a boy goes to school and his teacher tells him that everything can be thought of as a math problem. After hearing this, he becomes overwhelmed and starts seeing math problems everywhere he goes in everyday life. Now he believes that his teacher has put a math curse on him.(There were also math problems on all of the pages.)Personal Reflection:I enjoyed the story because it reminded me in a funny way how crazy students can get and the anxiety they can go through from just one subject in school. The book had lots of intense colors like orange, red, and yellow. I think the colors chosen for the book helps the reader feel what the boy in the story is going through, because he feels distraught and thinks he is going crazy because of a curse. However, I didn't like how the text on some of the pages swirled around the page in different directions. It made the book kind of difficult and annoying to read.Classroom Extension Ideas:1. I think it would be extra practice and another way for students to learn if they solved some of the math problems throughout the story.2. Since the story says everything can be thought of as a math problem, have children find objects around them and put them into a math problem.
  • (5/5)
    A young boy is learning about math in school. When he goes home is begins thinking about how everything in his life is like a math problem. The boy comes to the conclusion that his math teacher has put a curse on him. The boy starts his day off by picking out his clothes, but there are many options to choose from, which creates a problem. Then he has to figure out how long it takes to get dressed and eat breakfast so he can get out of the house and to school for a certain time. This is a great book to teach children about math and how important it is in our everyday lives. It shows how we use math everyday without realizing it.
  • (5/5)
    Everything is a math problem. This is the theme of a book. I believe that this book would be good to read to kids who are apathetic about math and believe that they will never use math in real life because this book proves them wrong. Everything really is a math problem whether is is subtly or more obvious.
  • (4/5)
    The main character's math teacher tells him that everything is a math problem, which puts a math curse on him. For a whole week everything he experiences turns into a story problem with very funny results.