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Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin

Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin

Écrit par Lloyd Moss

Raconté par Maureen Anderman


Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin

Écrit par Lloyd Moss

Raconté par Maureen Anderman

évaluations:
4/5 (24 évaluations)
Longueur:
18 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1999
ISBN:
9780545749695
Format:
Livre audio

Description

A lone trombone playing solo is joined by a trumpet in a duet until a French horn makes it a trio, and so on, as ten instruments, one by one, gather together for a joyous musical performance.
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1999
ISBN:
9780545749695
Format:
Livre audio

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4.1
24 évaluations / 20 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    This books explores the different musical instruments through fun and creative illustrations. The students get to look at the trombone, trumpet, French horn, cello, violin, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon and a harp. Not only does this focus on instruments but it also focuses on counting and exploring counting through solos for 1, due for 2, and trio for 3 and so on. This is a good informational book because it doesn't just teach one thing it teachers numbers and music. It also has good illustrations to go along with teaching students what a certain musical instrument is.
  • (4/5)
    What a delightful children's book! I enjoyed how it introduced different musical instruments to form increasingly larger musical grouups. The illustrations and curved sentences added to the sing-song feel of the book. Cute!
  • (4/5)
    Lloyd Moss, who worked for New York's classical music station, WQXR, for fifty-three years, turned to the world of children's literature in 1995, publishing this debut picture-book about an ever-expanding group of musicians who chime in, one by one, until a full orchestra is in swing! Beginning with a single trombone, Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin builds momentum and excitement, as each new player joins the group. The rhyming text bowls along, communicating the tone and feeling of each of the instruments - the "mellow" cello, the "darkly slick" clarinet - while also keeping the rhythm joyfully alive.A celebration of music that also functions as a counting book (the soloist becomes a duo, the duo a trio, and so on), Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin is an entertaining little tale that would make an ideal read-aloud selection for story-hour. The gouache illustrations by Marjorie Priceman are full of fun, with a sense of movement that perfectly complements the joie de vivre of the text, and are well deserving of the Caldecott Honor that they received. All in all, a book I would recommend to young music lovers, or to anyone looking for good read-aloud titles.
  • (4/5)
    The illustrations are beautiful, and they seem to move like the sound of a violin'This book is assembled in a very intricate and interesting way- without much writing, the pictures tell a story and resembles an actual concert-bravo.
  • (4/5)
    Lloyd Moss' Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin has an engaging, poetic text, combined with wonderful illustrations (I can certainly understand why this is a Caldecott Honor book), and is an informative and fun way to introduce children not only to ten important musical instruments, but also to the numbers one to ten (and solo to a chamber group of ten musicians). While the text itself is not spectacular, I think it would work very well as a read-aloud, either at home or in a Kindergarten or grade one classroom. The only (and very minor) issue I, personally, have with this book is the font size and the fact that the text is curved, which could perhaps prove distracting while reading (especially if reading aloud). I know that I would be afraid of misreading or accidentally skipping parts of the narrative, if I were reading this otherwise excellent picture book to a child or a group of children.
  • (4/5)
    Genre: Rhyme/PoetryGenre Critique: This book is a good example of poetry through the use of words with a repeating sound pattern. All the words flow together, one after another, in a way that carries the story along and keeps it moving, while giving the story meaning. Review/Critique: I thought this book was interesting, and could be utilized in the classroom for tying music into the curriculum. Media: Gouache
  • (4/5)
    Zin!Zin!Zin! a Violin has won the Caldecott Medal with its wonderful, playful watercolour paintings. The movement throughout the book is amazing, the instruments and faces are painted with accuracy, I could imagine being better. The text is always a rhyme of four lines, always moving. The illustrator Marjorie Priceman uses a wide variety of colours which make the book that vivid. Without reading the lines, one can imagine that one oft he theme oft he book is how to create an orchestra. At the beginning, a man is playing the trombone alone, but every page on instrument and its played is added.
  • (5/5)
    This is an excellent book for introducing students to musical terms and instruments. This book starts with a singe musician playing the trombone. Throughout the book other musicians join him one at a time until there are a total of ten. Each musician is playing a different instrument. The book introduces each instrument by describing a distinguishing physical characteristic and it's sound. It also introduces the terms for each new group as the musicians join.
  • (3/5)
    This book makes the reader feel as though he/she is watching a concert, which I thought was a great perspective to make the reader take. The book is a counting book but, also teaches musical instruments. It goes into details and educates the reader on what makes up an orchestra assemble on stage. I enjoyed the rhyming throughout the pages and the introduction to classical music, which students do not get much of today. (Caldecott Award Winner)
  • (4/5)
    This book is a Caldecott Honor about individual instruments that form an orchestra. The story is told in a poetic and flowing way, describing each instrument and what it sounds like. The artwork in this book is full of vibrant colors and watercolor illustrations. This book teaches children about musical instruments and musical groups, such as duos, trios, quartets, and ends with an entire orchestra.
  • (4/5)
    4Q 4PWritten in engaging verse with colorful descriptions of the instruments. The illustrations are boldly colored and show a lot of movement. Several concepts are introduced, including musical instruments, counting, and names for ensembles with different numbers of players. A lot of different elements invite dialogic reading.Are too many concepts introduced?Sometimes there is A LOT going on in the illustrations. Is it maybe too much?"Gleeful, bleating, sobbing, pleading, through its throbbing double-reeding" -- What do you think of this description of an oboe?
  • (4/5)
    Age: Primary, IntermediateThis book is a good example of poetry because each pages is written in verse, including rhyme, and every word appears to have been purposefully chosen to portray a strong message about the beauty of music.
  • (4/5)
    Author has also written Music Is and Our Marching Band.
  • (4/5)
    This book introduces the instruments and sounds of a chamber orchestra as they appear for a concert. It also provides a clever counting exercise, as the stage fills with more and more musicians and their instruments. As a creative counting book for young readers, this book lacks a specific theme, literary point of view or realistic characters. However, its illustrations are skillful in putting the jazzy, fluid idea of music into pictures. They also serve to create an interesting setting, where musicians are as funky as their instruments. Even more effective are the alliterative and rhyming words that the author uses to describe each instrument in detail.
  • (4/5)
    This is a very descriptive way to teach children about instruments though telling them the basics. The illustrations are great and also the book is full of rhymes.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book and the descriptive, flowing language used.
  • (4/5)
    This book was one of my favorite books growing up for many reasons. First, the book is all about musical instruments and I grew up in a musical family so it felt close to home for me. For example, the book introduces string, brass, and reed instruments to complete an orchestra. Second, I love the message of the book. The overall message of the book is to inform readers about different types of instruments while also learning how to count in music. For example, When the reader introduces the trumpet, it talks about the instrument but then also informs the reader that because there are two musicians, it is now a "duo".
  • (5/5)
    Summary:A lovely and bright picture book with flowing words that wave across each page introducing a new instrument, and a new word number until the orchestra is complete at ten. The illustrations dance across each double-page spread, flowing one directly into the next. This book introduces new vocabulary words, and highlights different musical instruments in an interesting and rhyming story.Personal Reaction:I truly enjoyed this book! The illustrations are bright and fun to look at over and over again. The funny way the words are typed on the pages provide an additional movement that mimics the rhymes created by the sounds the words make when read. Classroom extension ideas:1. This book would be great for a transition from reading (quiet time) to creative exercise. Students could use hand-held instruments to participate as the book is read, or create their own instruments for a classroom orchestra. 2. Using the number vocabulary terms in the book, students could create a collage that display the various different groups recognized by number in the book. A solo act, a duo act, a trio - from one to ten students can create visually a collage that represents each number of participants.
  • (2/5)
    This book was great if a child was into music or instruments or to use in a music classroom. I liked how the words were presented on the page in this book. For example, to help portray the music vibe in this book, the words were curvy, slanted, or in circles, never straight to show the rhythm. I also liked the language in this book. There were a lot of challenging words that a young reader may not understand; I personally didn’t understand half the words. They were musical words that the reader wouldn’t know unless he/she was a musician of some sort. But the context clues the author gave, helped the reader figure out the meaning of the confusing words. I think the big idea in this book was to learn about music and to learn to work together, as the multiple musicians had to in order to make a beautiful sound.
  • (4/5)
    First a trombone plays its silken tone, then a trumpet stings a note. Instruments begin to join on the stage and warm up for the concert. As each one comes out, we learn in beautiful language and pictures about the instrument and its special place in the orchestra. Children learn both numerical counting and what various groups are called: solo, duo, trio, quartet, etc.As an orchestra member myself, I was amazed at the accuracy of how the author has used words to describe the instruments. One of my favorite parts of listening to a performance is the warm up time rather than the actual performance. Each instrument is singing its own song and yet they all blend into this unique music that you realize will never be played again.This book could be used to teach counting, musical terms, or the differences between instruments. However, I really imagine letting this book be performed. Team up with the orchestra teacher and ask if the school orchestra would perform for your class. As you read about the violin soaring high, the students hear the “Zin! Zin! Zin!” sounds of a real violin. Let a flute really set a child's soul a-shivering. After a piece, let the children stand to their feet and cry, “Encore!”