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Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears

Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears

Écrit par Verna Aarema

Raconté par James Earl Jones


Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears

Écrit par Verna Aarema

Raconté par James Earl Jones

évaluations:
4/5 (83 évaluations)
Longueur:
10 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1984
ISBN:
9780545258906
Format:
Livre audio

Description

A tall tale sets off a comic chain of mishaps from Mosquito to Iguana to Python to Rabbit to Owl, but all is wisely resolved by King Lion at the jungle council meeting.
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1984
ISBN:
9780545258906
Format:
Livre audio


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4.2
83 évaluations / 72 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    GREAT illustrations, great book for the younger children
  • (3/5)
    For a folktale, this one is pretty well told. The one caveat I have is that this was Caldecott Award winner, so I feel remiss not mentioning the illustrations, which were very nice. I might give them four or five stars, but the story was kind of bare-bones for my tastes. The repetition was good. The structure was right, but I just wasn't enthralled while reading. Good book. Not quite great though.
  • (3/5)
    This is West African Tale about a group of animals that wouldn't typically be seen socializing together. It all starts when a mosquito starts telling the iguana some nonsense that he does not want to hear. This causes a domino effect of fear and concern amongst the other animals that doesn't allow for the owl to call for the sun to rise; therefore, leaving the other animals in darkness. The illustrations in this book are beautiful and would be a great example if African drawings were a part of the art curriculum in school. This book could also be used in the classroom when talking about folk tales and myths about why things are they way that they are! At the end of the story we see the mosquito buzzing in someones ear before it is swatted away. This tells the reader that when a mosquito is buzzing in your ear it is really them talking!
  • (4/5)
    First up for the ‘ILS 516 Folklore/Fairy Tales’ category is this story which my feelings toward are admittedly torn. Right off the bat, I loved the art. Everything is vibrant and the sun and owl in particular look really great. Yet, I am confused as to why mosquitoes buzz. I thought the story was going to end by saying how the ruler of the animal kingdom (the lion) punishes the mosquitoes by making them only buzz so that they cannot cause any more death. But, that never happens. Though this is not entirely the fault of the author since it is a story translated and passed down through generations, I am still trying to wrap my head around it. My torn feelings aside, I still enjoyed reading Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears: A West African Tale.
  • (3/5)
    A Caldecott medal winner. Beautiful illustrations of many African animals, from the smallest up to King Lion. Part of the story is sad, when a monkey breaks a branch that falls on an owl's nest and kills one of the owlets. Mother Owl is so sad, she will not hoot to wake the sun, so that day can come. King Lion investigates to find out who is to blame for the owlet's death, to bring justice. The story is best for school-age children. Recently it was discussed in one of our grade two classrooms, part of a unit on folk tales and fairy tales.
  • (4/5)
    This book is a winner of the Caldecott Award. It explains exactly what the titles entails: why mosquitoes buzz in people’s ears. A mosquito tells an iguana a mouthful of nonsense, annoying the iguana. The iguana puts sticks in his ears so that he cannot hear the mosquito, or anything, for that matter. The actions of the iguana to the mosquito begins a chain reaction throughout the forest, causing Mother Owl not to wake the sun. There is a council meeting as King Lion gets to the root of the problem, the mosquito.I really enjoyed this book. It is very clever and imaginative. It does have a baby owl die in the story, which may not be suitable for the really young children, but I read it to my daughter and she seemed to like the book. The pictures are beautifully done, too. They are very colorful and big. Last summer, my daughter asked me why the bugs would fly around our heads and not leave us alone and this story answered her question! The author included random sounds in the text, too, which livened the story even more.This book has a repetitive style of writing, as well. When reading about the council meeting, I would ask the children about which animal startled the next, in order to include participation and exercise their memory. I could ask them to give me their impressions of what noises they think the animals make and draw big pictures of their favorite animal in the story.
  • (4/5)
    This book is very, very interesting. It is about a group of animals. These animals could easily be subsituted for humans. The book starts out as a simple word spoken and turns into a nightmare. It takes an entire village and a noble leader to make the correction so that everyone will be on the same accord. They blamed each other for there own faults. The illustrations in the book could have been a little more interesting but it did not take away from the storyline.
  • (4/5)
    This is a great cumulative story, filled with appropriate sound effects for every animal mentioned.It does get a little long (reciting long lists of animals will do that), so it might not be best for little-little ones who cannot sit through it.One thing to note is that this book does have a center where an owlet is accidentally killed and its mother goes into mourning. If you do not feel your child can handle this sort of information, by all means choose another book to read.
  • (3/5)
    "Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears:A West African Tale" is a Caldecott medal winner. It is a book about a pesky mosquito who annoys a Iguana. The Iguana puts sticks in his ears in hopes to ignore the mosquito. In turn the python takes offense to the iguana ignoring him and so on and so on down the line this continues. During this story one of the owl's babies are killed. In the end everyone is looking for someone to blame and it turns out that they beleive it is the mosquito's fault and that the mosquito should be killed. The mosquito hears all of this and goes around buzzing in people's ears asking if everyone is still mad at him. This is a beautifly illustrated book. The illustrator drew the pictures to resemble Africa. There is a large assortment of African animals. The story line is cute as well. In the classroom, I would ask my students if they could draw their favorite African jungle animal. We would have fun sharing our pictures and explaining to each other why this particular animal was our favorite.
  • (4/5)
    Overall, I really enjoyed this story. I loved the illustrations. I thought that they were unique and very interesting. For example, there was a scene in the story where all the animals were gathered at a meeting. I had to look closely in order to find all the animals, which definitely made me pay attention to all of the illustrations. With that being said, I thought that the illustrator did a really great job. Also, I liked the onomatopoeia throughout the story. For example, the author wrote, “[The crow] flew into the forest crying kaa, kaa, kaa!” I definitely thought that it enhanced the story because the sounds of different animals were being introduced. After reading this story, I think that the big idea is to introduce the topic of cause and effect. The story was centered on a chain reaction and its consequences. An example of a chain reaction that was mentioned in the story would be, “So, it was the rabbit who startled the crow, who alarmed the monkey, who killed the owlet-- and now Mother Owl won’t wake the sun so that the day can come.” This is a very interesting story and one that I enjoyed a lot.
  • (4/5)
    This book is based on an African fable and includes stunning, bright, and expressive illustrations. It is a morality story about lies and consequences. This fable could be enjoyed by children in early education through elementary school. It would be a great choice to spark discussion of cause and effect and/or consequences.Art medium used: watercolor airbrush, pastels, India ink, cut shapes
  • (4/5)
    This is a great story to teach cause and effect, especially the effect ones actions have on the entire community, beyond simply the ones who are initially involved.
  • (3/5)
    Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears is an African folktale based on the realistic consequences of telling a lie and the harmful effects it may have to others. Author, Verna Aardema, retells this tale in a playful tone, jerking the audience between dramatic and humorous aspects. The unique illustrations add spunk to the storyline; specfically due to the white outlines of the abstract animal illustrations. I adored the author’s efforts to recreate an entertaining story from a life lesson almost every individual will encounter. To reader’s warning, a child does pass away; making this not a choice of text for a sensitive audience. However, overall this is a great read for younger children, in presenting a serious lesson with a cheerful tone.
  • (4/5)
    A funny story of how telling stories one ear to another ear can twist things.
  • (4/5)
    Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears a West African TaleThis audio book starts out with an iguana and a mosquito talking about the yams the farmer was digging.Snake then approaches the iguana, then goes into the rabbit hole. Love the animals and their sounds as the parade of animals continues.Lion calls a meeting and he gets down to the problems....I received this book from National Library Service for my BARD (Braille Audio Reading Device).
  • (4/5)
    Full of imagination, colorful illustrations and word sounds, this book illustrates an African folktale come to life. The domino effect from one iguana's being upset to the sun not even coming up shows human nature through the actions of African animals. It is eventually resolved and everything is back to normal, but all the animals have learned a lesson. The mosquito, who started everything by telling a tall tale ends up whining and complaining by buzzing in people's ears. Of course, people respond by swatting the mosquito!I really liked the word sounds like mek mek, krik krik, kaa kaa, pem pem, purup purup,Zeee and KPAO! It might be fun to brainstorm with children about how letter sounds reflect sounds we hear in nature or even around us in our classroom.This book lends itself to doing some kind of art project with either watercolor or maybe with paper shapes.
  • (5/5)
    Tags: Multicultural, Flies, Tall TalesSummary: A book about someone telling stories to everyone they can really get them to listen too. Almost like in todays society one person tells a story about someone or something and then by the end of the day, that story is now ten times worse then it was when the story was first told in the early morning. In this book begins when a mosquito tell the iguana a tall tale then its get said another way to the next thing, etc. Personal Reactions: Its a very funny and down to earth book of just how far a tall tale can go and how far will one let it go before stopping the next person and it getting out of control. Extension Ideas: You can really teach little people the difference in a 'tall tale' and an out right 'lie'.
  • (4/5)
    Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears is a delightful folktale about why mosquitoes are annoying. Verna Aardema, the author, employs different animals found in West Africa to weave an entricate tale about not jumping to conclusions. The Mosquito wants to gossip and tell ridiculous stories to Iguana. Iguana, however, is so upset by the lie Mosquito tells that he ignores Mosquito, leading to a whole chain of events that results in a baby owl being killed!This book is great for teaching lessons about not jumping to conclusions, and hearing everyone's point of view.
  • (5/5)
     Summary: The Mosquito tells a bad joke to Iguana who is so upset she put sticks in her ears so that she doesn't hear mosquito. Iguana also doesn't hear Snake when she says good morning. Snake concludes that Iguana must not like her and is plotting against her so she hides a rabbits den causing Rabbit to run out of the den alarming the Crow, who sets of an alarm for the whole jungle which ultimately results in the death of a baby owl. In this imaginay world Mama owl is responsible for hooting so that the sun will come up. However she is so upset about her baby's death that she refuses to wake the sun. The animals then call to a meeting to figure out who's fault it was that the baby owl was dead. Eventually they figure out that the mosquito started the chain reaction. Mosquito is so upset he doesn't dare talk to any of the animals so he whispers in people's ears to see if the animals ares still mad at him. Since the person usually swats at him when he does this,he comcludes that the animals are still mad at him. Review:I gave this book five stars becasue i think it is a great cultural story. The story is imaginative and the children can connect it to their own lives as well as to onother culture. I also really like the illustrations on this book they were simple but put against the white background they really stand out and they are different in that they resemble African arts and Drawings.
  • (3/5)
    Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears is a retelling of a West African folk tale by Verna Aardema. It won the Caledecott Medal in 1976 and was part of the materials for children ages 5 to 8 class that I took.Mosquito likes to tell tall tales. One day he annoyed Iguana so much that he stuck sticks in his ears to avoid having to listen to pesky Mosquito any longer. Iguana's self imposed deafness sets off a series of bad events resulting in the death of one of Owl's children.Owl then is too sad to wake the sun. King Lion must call all the animals together to learn the truth behind Owlet's death. When the evidence leads back to Mosquito he is forever punished to whisper in people's ears.Leo and Diane Dillon's use of gradients and well defined shapes to make their animals brings energy to the story, drawing the eyes right into the action.Although I re-read it for college, my son first introduced the book to me a couple years ago. He is very fond of African folk tales. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears is one of his favorites.
  • (4/5)
    Diane and Leo Dillon were awarded the Caldecott Medal for their woodcut illustrations of this African folk tale. When the mosquito tells the iguana what he saw, the iguana gets annoyed. Not wanting to listen to such nonsense, he plugs his ears. As a result, he doesn’t hear the python’s greeting, and the snake believes iguana is angry with him and plotting some sort of revenge. So, python looks for a hole to hide in, which frightens the rabbit …. Etc It’s a fun, repetitive story that children will enjoy listening to, and which explores the unintended consequences of our actions.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book. the vivid illustrations really are what make the book great. I would use this book as a case and effect lesson for third grade students. When they tel lie, it may effect others around them. I would also use this book for a "call back" activity. I don't remember exactly what the correct term for this is, but I would have students be able to tell me what would happen next because it has sequencing elements in it as well. I think students anywhere from 2nd to 5th grade would like this book because of the illustrations and the fact that it is about animals.
  • (5/5)
    A West African fable
  • (5/5)
    Great storytelling.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a multicultural tale that is appropriate for elementary school children. It is a pour quoi tale that will intrigue kids because of the interesting story line and bright, cultural pictures.
  • (3/5)
    The illustration style grew on me as this story progressed. Pretty interesting folktale.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this beautifully-illustrated folktale as a child, and have fond memories of poring over the Dillons' colorful mosaic-like artwork. The story of a chain reaction, in which a mosquito's careless words create a growing crisis, spreading fear and chaos throughout the forest, Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears is exactly the kind of progression-tale that makes for an entertaining story-hour.Winner of the Caldecott Medal in 1975, this wonderful picture book is a classic of children's literature, treasured both for its story and illustrations. The Dillons' work is always beautiful, and Aardema is justly celebrated for her respectful folkloric adaptations. Recommended to all young folklore lovers, and to anyone who appreciates the harmonious meeting of word and image.
  • (1/5)
    This 1975 Caldecott Medal winner is a fascinating folk tale of a simple event that grew into a chain of dominoes, each one tapping the other to complete a whisper down the alley communication.When a mosquito whispered into the chameleon's ear, each succession of communication grows more complicated.The illustrations are lively and busy.
  • (5/5)
    Why Mosquitoes Buzz in Peoples Ears is a picture book that offers a great lesson to young children on what can happen when you tell a lie. This story takes place in a forest where a mosquito tells a lie to an iguana passing by. Highly annoyed, the iguana puts sticks in his ears to block out what is being said by the mosquito. This then causes a chain reaction throughout the forest, which supposedly causes the sun not to rise. Recommended for children aged 4 to 8It is a great story to help explain how telling a lie can affect more than just the a single person. I must say, I was a little surprised to read about the death of a young owlet. But I don’t think it would be too much for young children. The illustrations are nice and colorful!! They will surely keep any kid entertain. Another book written in the same decade: The One Eyed Cat by Paula Fox
  • (5/5)
    A fun story/tale about how we have come to kill mosquitoes that buzz in our ears. A tale from Africa that involves a whole jungle of animals trying to live with each other. By far the illustrations are very memorable but also is the story. An example where a story is benefited by the illustrations and the other way around is equally true. The illustrations are beautiful with all the different shades and shapes compiling into an animal. The contrast between day time (white background) and the night time (black background) works well with the colorful animals. Very seldom I enjoy a story this much when the animals communicate with each other as the iguana to the rabbit to the snake to the lion etc... Young children should be attracted to the different story and the wonderful illustrations. Ages 5 and 9.