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Max's Christmas

Max's Christmas

Écrit par Rosemary Wells

Raconté par Jenny Agutter


Max's Christmas

Écrit par Rosemary Wells

Raconté par Jenny Agutter

évaluations:
4/5 (20 évaluations)
Longueur:
8 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1989
ISBN:
9780545258289
Format:
Livre audio

Description

Irrepressible Max wants to stay up late on Christmas so he can see Santa Claus.
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1989
ISBN:
9780545258289
Format:
Livre audio


À propos de l'auteur

Rosemary Wells (b. 1942) is a bestselling children’s book author and illustrator. Born in New York City, Wells was raised in New Jersey. She grew up in a theatre family. Her mother was a ballet dancer and her father was an actor-playwright. “We had a houseful of wonderful books. Reading stories aloud was as much a part of my childhood as the air I breathed,” Wells recalls. Wells attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Since 1968, Wells has published more than 120 books, including seven novels. In her picture books, she pairs her delightful illustrations with humorous, and emotionally adept themes. Among her bestselling picture book titles are Voyage to the Bunny Planet, My Very First Mother Goose, and Read to Your Bunny. She is best known for the Max and Ruby series, which depicts the adventures of sibling bunnies. In addition to her picture books, Wells has written several historical fiction and mystery/suspense novels for young adults. She has won countless awards, such as the Parents’ Choice Foundation Award and multiple School Library Journal Best Book of the Year awards.

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4.2
20 évaluations / 19 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (3/5)
    Leo the tiger simply cannot comprehend why he cannot complete tasks in a timely manner. He cannot write; He cannot draw. He cannot write; He cannot even eat without making a sloppy mess. His father is very concerned and wonders outloud what is wrong with Leo?A loving mother notes that Leo is fine, he is simply a late bloomer. While Leo's father is frustrated, it is Leo who is most anxious. And, then one magical day, Leo bloomed "in his own good time," as the author notes!And, when he blooms, he draws inside the lines. He can read lots of books, Finally, he made it!What a wonderful book to read to a child who is struggling, confused and anxious. Leo's mother was his advocate. She knew he would bloom, but not at the same time of others, and not at the misunderstanding of his father!
  • (5/5)
    Poor Leo can’t seem to do anything right . . . he can’t read, he can’t write, he can’t draw. He’s a sloppy eater, and he doesn’t speak. What is the matter with Leo?“Nothing,” says Leo’s mother. “Leo is just a late bloomer.”But will Leo ever bloom?Charming illustrations accompany the simply narrative that helps young readers learn that everyone blooms in their own good time. A delightful tale for parents and children to enjoy together. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    This is a good book to have in your classroom for chidlren who may not be developing at the same pace as the other children. This book is good to let children know that everyone is different and everyone learns at a different pace. It would be good to talk to your students about how everyone is different and explain this book further.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book. I don't care that I'm pushing 40. This, like God Bless the Gargoyles and The Giving Tree, is a book that should always be kept in one's library, regardless of one's age.
  • (4/5)
    Leo can't do the things that his friends can do, which upsets him. However, his mother tells him that he will be able to do them later when he is ready, and he does. This is a great book that teaches the fact that everyone is different and it takes patience to become good at something.
  • (4/5)
    Leo the tiger can't do a lot of things his friends can, like write, or eat neatly, or speak. His father is worried but his mother says Leo is just a late bloomer. A good book for teaching kids about perseverance, and that everyone learns in their own time.
  • (4/5)
    Available in hardback, paperback, and as a board book. Companion book: Little Louie the Baby Bloomer. Author has written and illustrated over 100 picture books for children, including a series about a mouse. When Barbara Bush was first lady she read Leo the Late Bloomer on television as part of her literacy campaign. About 450 of his cartoons appeared in The New Yorker.
  • (5/5)
    This was one of my favorite books as a kid, and still is! Poor little Leo. He comes out great in the end though. My other favorite book was "The Poky Little Puppy" but that's a whole other story!
  • (4/5)
    For those whoare aren't quite up with the pace.
  • (4/5)
    Leo the tiger was a late bloomer. He didn't learn to read and write when the other baby animals did, and he couldn't draw, eat neatly, or speak when they could. His father wondered aloud what the problem was, but his mother counseled patience, declaring that he would bloom when it was his time. After much worried watching, his father eventually let him be, and then... Leo bloomed!Originally published in 1971, this classic picture-book addresses a common childhood (and parent) concern: the feeling that one's development, either overall or in some specific area, is delayed, because it doesn't happen at exactly the same time as it does with one's peers. The simple story here gently drives home the point that everyone is on their own schedule, and that it shouldn't be a cause of undue concern when one child develops a skill at a different time than another. I found Robert Kraus's text quite humorous, especially the depiction of Leo's father and his worried watching, and thought the illustrations by José Aruego, whose artwork I am familiar with from various folkloric retellings he has been involved in, were colorful and appealing. Recommended to anyone, parent or child, worried about development schedules.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: This book is about Leo who is a late bloomer. He cannot read, write or spell. Leo and his family is very sad that Leo is not like the rest of them, but eventually he learns! His first statement is "I made it!" which makes his family so happy!Personal reflection: This book is good for younger students to hear and read because it shows them that everyone has struggles when they are first starting to learn how to read and write.Class use: Have students write about a time when they felt like a late bloomer.
  • (5/5)
    This is a sweet picture book about a tiger who is just a late bloomer than all the other kids. This teaches that not everybody is always going to move at the same pace scholastically. Such a cute read for students who may feel discouraged.
  • (4/5)
    Great story about being a late bloomer.
  • (2/5)
    Summary: "Leo the Late Bloomer" is about a tiger named Leo who is a late bloomer. He cannot write, draw, eat neatly, or say a word. His father worries about him and begins watching him to see when he will bloom. As seasons change, Leo does not bloom and his father stops watching him. Soon after, Leo blooms in his own time and he is able to write, draw, eat neatly and speak a sentence just like the others his age.Review: The main idea of this story is Leo is a late bloomer which worries his father, however soon Leo blooms on his good time. I thought this story had many amazing pictures that helped carry along the story. For example, when the book discussed how Leo could not write, it illustrated all the other animals being able to write. This symbolizes how Leo is considered a late bloomer since he does not have the skills compared to the other animals.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book for two reasons. One reason I liked this book was because of the main character. I felt that Leo was a very relatable character. He struggled with being on the "same level" as his other animal friends. I think that this is very relatable for children because they may feel like they are also falling behind in certain aspects that their peers may be excelling at. Another reason I liked this book was for the plot. In the beginning of the book, it talked about all the things that his animal friends could do that he couldn't do. Even his parents began to worry. But, then at the end, he finally bloomed in his own time. I thought that the plot portrayed a very powerful message, and that is what made this story great. Overall, I think that the big message of this book was that everyone grows up in their own time and in their own way.
  • (4/5)
    I think this book could be used in a classroom to explain the all students are different and to not judge them for being different.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this book because it didn't really say Leo has a disability, it just expresses he is a late bloomer. I would love to share this with kids because not all children develop at the same place. This book could definitely help motivate a student who may be a little behind.
  • (2/5)
    This book is about a young lion that can’t talk, walk, or do much of anything like the other lions, but suddenly he has abilities just like everyone else. The book ends happily. The book is for young children aged 3-6, but is rather vague on the message. The book implies that everyone is different but in the end we are all the same. I was disappointed in the book because the main character didn’t face any challenges. I would not suggest this book for purposes of teaching about disabilities, but it is a cute story. I believe young children can handle a little more information and description as to why Leo was different and slower then the other lions. Had the story addressed a specific disability I would have suggested the story for a classroom read aloud. The story did tell children that being slow or behind was ok, but it didn’t address the bigger picture, and that usually people are always different, not just for a short time.
  • (5/5)
    Leo and his father do not believe that Leo is a late bloomer. Every day Leo’s father watches his son to do things like the other lion cubs do, but Leo does not. Leo’s mother tells them to wait with patience. One day, when the time is right for Leo, he blooms.