Découvrez votre prochain livre audio préféré

Devenez membre dès aujourd'hui et écoutez gratuitement pendant 30 jours
The Boy Who Cried Wolf

The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Écrit par B.G. Hennessy

Raconté par Peter Scolari


The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Écrit par B.G. Hennessy

Raconté par Peter Scolari

évaluations:
4/5 (21 évaluations)
Longueur:
6 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2008
ISBN:
9780545521666
Format:
Livre audio

Description

A retelling of a timeless tale that is sure to leave readers grinning sheepishly.
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2008
ISBN:
9780545521666
Format:
Livre audio

À propos de l'auteur


Lié à The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Livres audio associé

Avis

Ce que les gens pensent de The Boy Who Cried Wolf

4.1
21 évaluations / 15 Avis
Qu'avez-vous pensé ?
Évaluation : 0 sur 5 étoiles

Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    I liked that in this version the boy who cried wolf was doing it to have another boy come hang out and spend the day with him. And although I loved the last pages illustration of the sheep all hiding up in the tree the boy would sit under each day, I did feel that it needed like one more closing sentence even though the story ended saying, "And the shepherd boy spent the rest of the day looking for his sheep, all by himself". Or perhaps if that line was on the last illustrated page it would feel more of a closing sentence.
  • (5/5)
    I would use this book to teach the literary element of theme. I think students will like this book because they would want to find out what happens to the boy.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. The boy who cried wolf is a classic. The story is a little different but it stays true to the moral of the story. This is always a great book top read when teaching students about the value of being honest. The students can have fun guessing what will come next, but at the same time engage in some thought provoking ideas about the boy. I believe all students will understand the lesson being portrayed. I also love that students will remember this story better than being told not to lie.
  • (5/5)
    The Boy Who Cried Wolf teaches children the importance of being honest. The book is about a boy whose job is to watch the sheep and make sure they don't escape. The boy decided to yell out wolf to cause the men to run rescue when there is no real problem. The boy continued to do this about two more times, but when he really needed help no one came to help him. Children can learn that you have to be honest in order for people to believe you.
  • (4/5)
    The Boy Who Cried Wolf is the old tale about a shepherd who told the town that wolves were after his sheep so many times that when the wolves really did come, no one believed him. I love this tale because it teaches honesty. To me, honesty is a huge factor. I can NOT stand a liar!! Many of the kids that I baby sit tell little white lies that will prevent them from getting into trouble, but they forget that Miss Kaylee has eyes everywhere and so I always remind them of this tale and let them decide to tell the truth without me having to push it. Morals should be taught at a very young age these tales do that best of all in a way that little kids can understand.
  • (4/5)
    This retell of the classic folktale emphasizes the importance of telling the truth. When the shepherd boy was bored, he lied to his town saying he saw a wolf. When he discovered it led him to have an exciting day, he did it again. However, when the wolves did in fact show up for his sheep, the shepherd boy ran to his fellow towns people but, no one came to help him. No one trusts someone who is a liar. Honesty is an important quality to possess, and it makes a person trustworthy.
  • (5/5)
    An interesting fable with a great moral to it: never cry for help unless you are really in need. I've heard of this story all my life, but never actually read the book itself. It definitely serves as a great life lesson.
  • (3/5)
    A young shepherd boy is always so bored. He even tried playing with his sheep but they didn't seem interested. One day the boy decides that he's been bored long enough and he wants some excitement. He runs into town yelling that wolves were after his sheep. The town people come to help but find no wolves. The little boy does the same thing the next day and then again a third day. On the third day, the boy was really telling the truth but the town people do not believe him. This is a very good story to teach children about lying.
  • (4/5)
    Out of boredom, the little shepherd boy creates some excitement. He begins to should "WOLF!" In response, the townsfolk run with rakes and other forms of weapons to protect the boy and his sheep. There was no wolf. The next day out of boredom, the boy does the same thing, but this time he claims there are two wolves. The townspeople run to his rescue only to find that there are no wolves. On the third day, a real wolf comes up to the sheep and the boy. No one believes him. This book is a good tool to use when teaching children about the consequences of lying.
  • (4/5)
    A little shepherd boy becomes bored while watching his sheep on a hill. The little boy craves attention and decides to tell a little white lie, in order to get some attention. Unfortunately, the shepherd boy tells too many lies, which leads him to trouble. This is a great read aloud book for grades Kindergarten through 3rd, because it teaches them why they shouldn’t lie. The illustrations in this book are cute, funny, and colorful. The illustrator uses water color which creates detail, and makes a much better visual for children reading this.
  • (3/5)
    A classic tale about a little boy who cried wolf (as said in the title) when he gets bored monitoring his sheep. The town all came running to his rescue the first two times he claimed that there were wolf after his sheep, but the third time (when there really were THREE wolves after his sheep)- NO ONE came to his rescue. This is because no one believed him because he lied about it twice before. This story can be used from grade levels K-3 to teach lessons on being honest and on lessons with predicting.
  • (4/5)
    Simple well-known story about a boy who is bored at work and creates fake problems. He cries wolf twice and twice the towns people come to his rescue. But when wolves really do show up, no one believes him. Its a fun and cheery book.
  • (3/5)
    The Boy Who Cried Wolf is a traditional tale that was retold in a very traditional manner. The boy is a shepherd and becomes bored with his daily activities. He decides to run into town and tell the people there is a wolf. This happens two days in a row, and the people realize he was making it all up. On the third day, three wolves approach the sheep hoping they will be lunch. When the boy runs to the people crying for help, they all ignore him because they think he is making it up again.I was not impressed with this retelling of the story. Since the storyline is the same as the traditional version, I looked to the pictures for something more up to date. I was disappointed in the illustrations. The only part that was exciting was the facial expressions of the sheep.Even though I didn't really like this version of the story, I would still probably use it in the classroom. I think it would be good for younger students. I read it to my daughter who is in first grade, and she enjoyed it. I asked her about the lesson that was taught and she could tell me what it was. I think it would be good to use to enforce the moral of the story.
  • (4/5)
    An interesting retelling of the classic Aesop’s Fable where the author sticks closely to the original story adding in a nice chorus that children can participate in (if used as a read aloud) or which serve to make easier the task of an emerging independent reader (repetition is always welcome when readers are just starting out). What really makes this story shine are the illustrations…they are fantastic. I love that the author gives the story some repetition and at the same times the illustrations give us so much to look at. The “village” off in the distance is rather a hodge-podge of buildings that very nearly gives it the appearance of a modern city-scape in miniature. The sheep’s expressions and activities are adorable, funny and, at times, completely outlandish (they wear blindfolds and even play what may be the cutest game of leap frog EVAR)! As the villagers rush out to answer his cry of WOLF there is another fine use of repetition (on each of their trips out they say No wolf in the pasture, No wolf on the hill, No wolf in the forest). Additionally, the villages (like the village itself) are a hodge-podge of people; you get your usual peasants carrying rakes and pitchforks but also in the mix are rather modern looking folk in suits and hats or casual wear (including ball caps) to the more outlandish characters (a knight in full armor, a three musketeer looking guy)…there are even people with umbrellas, jousting lances and a baseball bat!!! I thought the ending fairly traditional…and the illustration at the end with the VERY worried looking boy and the sheep going unnoticed by him huddled at the top of the tree to be very charming and my children found that to be so funny as to roll on the floor laughing. While the story doesn’t explicitly come out and slap the reader in the face with the “moral,” it’s really not necessary and a modest amount of questioning or discussion with children (except for those who are VERY young) should bring to light what the moral is quite easily. We found this version to be totally charming and would buy it for the illustrations alone! I give it 4 stars and would recommend it to anyone who collects picture books, what fun!
  • (4/5)
    This is pretty good, but I don't love it. The illustrations are giggle-inducing and the text is fun. I'm not sure why I don't love it.