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Creepy Carrots!

Creepy Carrots!

Publié par Weston Woods Audio


Creepy Carrots!

Publié par Weston Woods Audio

évaluations:
4.5/5 (64 évaluations)
Longueur:
8 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780545748223
Format:
Livre audio

Description

In this hilarious picture book, the Twilight Zone comes to the carrot patch asa rabbit fears his favorite treats are out to get him. Narrated by James Naughton with music by David Ma
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780545748223
Format:
Livre audio


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4.5
64 évaluations / 56 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (3/5)
    Creepy Carrots is a book about Jasper Rabbit. Whenever he walks to school he passes a carrot field and he picks carrots to eat. When he walks home, he picks carrots to eat. Every time that he walks past the carrot field, he picks carrots to eat. One day, the carrots decided to come up with a plan, so they start to follow Jasper Roabbit around at night. Jasper gets scared whenever he sees the carrots but whenever he tries to show someone that they are following him, the carrots hide and no one believes him. Eventually, Jasper gets tired of being afriad of carrots so he decides to build a big wall around the carrot field. When he is done, the carrots throw a party because their plan to keep Jasper out worked. Genre: fantasy because carrots and rabbits cant talk.
  • (5/5)
    “Creepy Carrots!” by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Peter Brown is one of the best picture books I have read in a long time! I loved the way the illustrations enhanced the text: the black borders, the shadows, and way only the carrots were drawn in color. All of these details and more added to the creepy tone of the story. The carrots were made to look frightening, but in a really cute way. I also loved the twist at the end, when the carrots celebrate being protected from Jasper. This was a great addition to the plot, and is one of the main reasons I love this story so much. The only message I could take from this book, aside from it being entertaining, is that things are not always as they seem; at first, the reader is led to believe that the carrots are the bad guys and that Jasper is the victim, but then all of that changes once the readers realizes that the carrots are only trying to protect themselves from being eaten!
  • (4/5)
    This book is pretty cool. Based around the old T.V. series The Twilight Zone, much of the book is in black and white except for the carrots that attempt to scare the young rabbit. The black and white of the illustrations clearly gives a creepy feel to the book as a whole. It also allows the orange objects and orange carrots to stand out from the rest of the background. This book is more of a humorous one as opposed to a story that has a main message. Throughout the book, the reader is unsure if the carrots are trying to scare him or if it is just his overactive imagination. To keep the carrots away from him, he builds a fence with a moat around the cabbage patch. this is what the carrots wanted all along. This way the rabbit would never be able to come and eat them again. Despite being without a message, it is a fun book that is wonderful for the Halloween season.
  • (5/5)
    Creepy Carrots! by Aaron Reynolds is a mashup between Peter Rabbit and your typical zombie story. Japser Rabbit loves the carrots that grow in the Crackenhopper fields. But there's a rumor that they are evil, monster carrots.Like Nancy Raines Day's On a Windy Day, there's a monstrous version of the creeping carrots and then there's a reveal of which ordinary objects went to create the illusion of the carrots.The monster pages are done in a comic book, horror style heavy on the orange and black Ñ perfect for a Halloween read. The reveal pages are contrasted with their wider range of colors and almost pastel hues.But as every horror story should, there's a twist at the end. Maybe, just maybe, there's some truth to Jasper's over-active imagination.
  • (4/5)
    This is a fantasy book. This book follows a young rabbit named Jasper. Jasper loves to eat wild carrots from a forest by his house. He ate them during the morning, afternoon, and night. All of a sudden, Jasper is seeing creepy carrots following him everywhere! He tells his parents but they don't believe him and they think it is all in his head. Jasper knows tat it isn't so he builds a fence and moat around the carrots in the wild so that they cant creep on him anymore. In the end, the book reveals that this is what the carrots wanted all along, because now Jasper cant get INTO the fence to eat them.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this book and really enjoyed reading it. The story was really funny and original. It was about a rabbit who thinks creepy carrots are following him. The illustrations in the book are black and white but the carrots and orange objects are in orange. When Jasper thinks he sees the creepy carrots, they turn into ordinary orange objects. I really was engaged while reading this book and the plot was organized. The language is descriptive and had me wanting to keep turning the page. The illustrations enhanced and supported the story. The big idea of this book was humor, imagination, and creativity.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved this book! I really enjoyed Peter Brown’s illustrations in the story. The pictures were mainly black and white, except for the orange carrots to provide emphasis and a sense of spookiness to go along with the story. The plot was very silly and I loved how the carrots followed Jasper around scaring him so that he would stop eating them. Finally, I really enjoyed the writing in this story. There was a lot of repetition throughout the plot “we looked under the bed, no creepy carrots, we looked in the closet, no creepy carrots”. The repetition built the suspense as I tried to figure out where the carrots were. The main idea of this story is that you should overcome your challenges rather than living in fear.
  • (5/5)
    . “Creepy Carrots” is a book about a rabbit named Jasper who loves carrots. Jasper likes to pick carrots from Crackenhopper fields and eat them on a daily basis. As the book goes on Jasper starts to realize that the carrots are not like normal carrots, they are creepy carrots. These carrots follow Jasper around, haunting him. Jasper has to figure out a plan to stop the creepy carrots from following him around. This book teaches about problem solving with a spooky and kooky twist to it. I really enjoyed this book for many reasons. One reason that I liked this book was because of the color scheme of the illustrations. The illustrations in this text are drawn with in grey scale, except for the orange carrots and some other miscellaneous items. I felt that this color scheme really added to the tone of the book. Another aspect of this book that I really appreciated was the repetition of the text, “no creepy carrots.” The last aspect of this text that I really loved was how the illustrations showed the movement of Jasper that went along with the text. Jasper is shown in multiple spots on one page to represent his running around his house looking for the creepy carrots.
  • (5/5)
    Creepy Carrots by Aaron Reynolds is a delightful tale about a rabbit named Jasper who loves carrots specifically ones from Crackenhopper Field but suddenly he begins to feel these carrots are stalking him. I loved this book! It is such a good book that engages the reader. I loved this book mainly because of the illustrations. The illustrations really helped to move the story along, added to the humor and overall feel of the story. The illustrations were all black and white expect for the “creepy” carrots. This made the carrots that much more creepy and almost made it look like an old scary movie or film. Peter Brown, the illustrator said he even used old scary movies and old horror shows to add to the story. An example of this is seen when Jasper feels the carrots are stalking him when he is brushing his teeth at night. The picture is all black and white and in the background the carrots are the only colorful objects on the page and they are just staring back at Jasper in the mirror. This I feel is a great example of how the illustrations added to the feel of the book. Through this illustration the reader, really can feel how frightened Jasper is. Also, when turning the page and seeing that the reader feels the scare of seeing those carrots in the mirror as well. These illustrations really did a great job of adding life to the book and in my opinion a main reason why it is such a good book. A final thing that I liked about the book was the overall story. The story line and book was so adorable and well thought out. An example of this is seen when Jasper finally decides to ends the stalking and builds a fence around Crackenhopper field. The story really comes full circle when you realize that the carrots were stalking him and they did it so he wouldn’t eat them anymore. I thought this was an adorable story line and one that came with a great message, which is to not steal/touch things that aren’t yours. It also is such a unique story line that I feel it just adds to the story and makes it that much more engaging.
  • (4/5)
    An awesome picture book, the illustrator utilizes illustrations and graphics to convey a spooky old movie feel as the author tells a not-so-scary story about creepy carrots. The narrative features Jasper rabbit and his love of carrots in Crackenhopper Field. He stops at the carrot patch multiple times a day to grab himself a carroty snack. One day, however, he thinks the carrots are following him home. Before he knows it, Jasper starts to see carrots everywhere. They are in his bathroom, his bedroom, his shed ... and always staring at him with threatening expressions. He tries to tell his parents about the creepy carrots, but every time he calls them, the carrots disappear. Finally, Jasper hatches a plan. The only way to make sure the creepy carrots never bother him again is to seal them in. He digs a moat, chops down wood, makes a fence, adds a few crocodiles, and walks away in relief, knowing that those carrots are locked up for good. The story ends, though, with a clever twist, showing us the whole situation from the carrots' perspective.The illustrations are mostly black and white, with the only color being the orange that peppers the pages. The pictures have liberal shading and shadows, looming shapes, and sharp dark lines. The faces are simple and scary, but a cartoony scary. The orange is bold against the dark background, and emphasizes the importance and the menace of the carrots. The cumulative effect is a dark world, old-fashioned and unsettling. Think along the lines of Frankenweenie. Truly, the art in the book carries the story just as much as the text, and makes this book a complete package of goodness. I loved this picture book. It creates an atmosphere of old-school horror, spooky but not really scary, perfect for young readers. I'm a fan of stories that combine a dark atmosphere with cute characters, a threatening backdrop with a sweet story, as occurs in this book. Also, it's a fun take on the horror genre, bringing in a lot of elements from scary movies but subverting them, such as the carrots popping up out of nowhere, but then being just ordinary objects on a second glance, or the scary shadows stretching across his bedroom, or the ominous sound effects. However, in this story, the monsters are just carrots. A completely nonthreatening vegetable, causing panic for a little rabbit. Ah, irony. The book is hilarious, with all the chilling accouterments of a scary story but none of the real scare. It has already become a new favorite for my daughters and me.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved this book because I thought the story was incredibly humorous and engaging. The first reason that I liked this book was because of the plot. Jasper Rabbit loved carrots from Crackenhopper Field. Jasper would eat them all the time. Jasper began to think that he was being followed by creeping carrots, but quickly thought it was just his imagination. Throughout the story Jasper experiences conflict, were carrots really following him or weren’t they? I loved the pace of the story and how the author led up to the carrots actually following Jasper. The story was also suspenseful due to not knowing if it was Jasper’s imagination or were carrots really following him? I just thought the story was incredible. The second reason why I loved the book was because of the illustrations. The expressions of Jasper and the creepy carrots really were appropriate to the mood of the story. It was evident to see what emotions the characters were experiencing. For example, when Jasper saw the carrots in his bathtub his mouth was wide open, eyebrows raised, and had fear in his eyes. Also throughout the story when the carrots would follow Jasper, you could see how upset and angry they were because they did not want him to keep picking carrots. The illustrations without a doubt enhanced the story. The main message of the book was that you should not take things that are not yours unless you ask.
  • (4/5)
    A fun book to read aloud around Halloween time. This animal fantasy book gives students a good laugh when Jasper Rabbit thinks that his favorite carrots are stalking him.
  • (5/5)
    This story is by far one of my favorite children’s books. The black and white drawings with simple glimpses of color, the use of descriptive sounds and the classic plot combine to create a story like no other. First off, the illustrator does an amazing job of drawing readers in with spooky and shadowed paintings of the menacing carrots. Only a great artist can create carrots that will even scare adults. Then the author describes a repetitive sound that the creepy carrots make, “tunktunktunk” as they follow behind the main character. This sound language creates not only a visual for the readers, but also adds an audible aspect. Then finally the author chose to use a classic plot, very similar to the boy who cried wolf, but then added a completely new and eccentric twist. This helped the story appeal to a number of readers. These three factors combine nicely to convey the author’s main message that you are often haunted by the things you love, especially when you know you are abusing the privilege of having them.
  • (4/5)
    Cute & creepy, perfect for a spooky story time.
    Pair with The Book That Eats People.
  • (5/5)
    This is a fun book about Jasper Rabbit and his love of carrots, until the day they started following him! The kids loved guessing about what was really happening and I loved hearing how their theories changed between kindergartners and 5th graders. This is a fun not-so-scary book to read with kids around Halloween, or any time!
  • (5/5)
    The colors on the cover drew me in too and I wanted to know how carrots could be creepy.

    Jasper Rabbit loves carrots, and he can’t resist them. Every time he walks by Crackenhopper Field he must crunch a few tasty treats. But then he starts to worry that his favorite food is following him. Can the carrots be after him? Jasper thinks so, and he knows he has to do something to protect himself!

    The story is the perfect blend of a little spooky and a little funny. I cracked up at the end and loved the faces on the carrots. Creepy Carrots is a wonderful book to read near Halloween because of the colors in the illustrations- but the book can be read any time of year, because it doesn’t actually tie into the holiday.
  • (5/5)
    Peter Brown's comic book style illustrations add to the humor and fright of Aaron Reynold's tale about a rabbit who imagines that his favorite treat, carrots, are out to get him. This entertaining story has a great surprise ending that delights children and adults. Even the jacket of this book has a story to tell its readers. I would highly recommend this book to any primary grade teacher.
  • (4/5)
    I think that this book is one that would be very enjoyable for young readers, particularly in October when it's halloween time when there is an emphasis on the spooky and the scary. I enjoyed how the book makes light of the rabbit's fear that he is being followed while also maintaining the gravity of the situation for the rabbit.
  • (5/5)
    A story about a little bunny who loves carrots but believes there are creepy carrots following him around. Great plot twist at the end.
  • (3/5)
    Jasper Rabbit loved carrots, especially those growing in Crackenhopper Field. But when they followed him home one evening, Jasper suddenly began to see Creepy Carrots everywhere. Despite his parents' assurances that there were no sinister root vegetables lurking in the vicinity, Jasper knew that they were out there, and he decided to take measures to protect himself. Little did he suspect the role he was playing in his vegetable foes' plan...Awarded a Caldecott Honor in 2013, Creepy Carrots is an amusing tale, one sure to please young children who want stories that are a little bit scary and quite a bit funny. I enjoyed the surprise ending, in which it is revealed that the carrots are deliberately frightening Jasper, in order to get him to stop eating them, but I do wonder a bit at the wisdom of convincing children that it's a bad idea to eat their vegetables. Don't we already have enough of a problem with that? Leaving that qualm aside, this was an entertaining tale, one made all the better by Peter Brown's spooky pencil illustrations, which capture both the frights and the fun of the story. Recommended to anyone looking for lighter Halloween fare for younger children.
  • (5/5)
    Jasper Rabbit loves CARROTS. And in the field, there were plenty of carrots for the taking.

    Until one day, the carrots started to follow Jasper Rabbit. Jasper began to see carrots everywhere...and he was frightened! Jasper hatches a plan to free himself from these CREEPY CARROTS! He builds a fence so they will never get out...but it seems that carrots had a plan too...
  • (3/5)
    What if your overactive childhood imagination took your most favorite thing and turned them into monsters, following you around every corner?! What if you never had proof?! You'd go out and take care of the problem yourself. That's what Jasper did! Or was the trick on him after all?!
  • (5/5)
    Jasper Rabbit loves grabbing a carrot (or two or three or...) every time he passes by the patch on his way to and fro school and other places. But when he starts seeing creepy carrots appear throughout his home, he is terrified! This humorous picture book is great. I've read it with many children of different ages ranging from 3 to 10, and it delights all of them; the children always end up clamoring to hear it again. It's a fun one to read aloud because you can do a cheesy horror voice for the creepy carrots. No worries for the easily scared -- all's well that ends well in this book.
  • (4/5)
    Funny, not to scary and great illustrations!
  • (5/5)
    Clever picture books are my favorites! A hungry bunny is always eating carrots from a specific patch...burg then the carrots set their plan in action to make him stop. Muahahahahaha!
  • (4/5)
    Very enjoyable book, keeps the readers attention in a silly way. Fun read that would be great for any age to enjoy.
  • (3/5)
    The character in this book had a patch of carrots. He thought that the carrots in the patch were being creepy, so he started to investigate. He eventually ended up building a fence around the carrot patch, which solved his problem.
  • (4/5)
    The carrots that grow in a field called Crackenhopper field are the fattest, crispiest carrots around. Jasper Rabbit cannot resist pulling some rabbits out of the ground as he walks past them. He begins hearing and seeing creepy carrots wherever he goes, so he devises a plan to try to get rid of them. This book is categorized as fantasy because the rabbits in the story talk and the carrots move around, but the idea of being scared of the dark and monsters being being in a child's room is a real fear for kids. Alos, the theme of taking something that isn't yours to take is present throughout the book. Genre: Fantasy Age Appropriateness: Intermediate
  • (5/5)
    This book is full of humor, suspense, and fantastic design. In the classroom, it would be a great tool to ask children what they think is really going on in the story or to make predictions, as whether the carrots are truly creeping or not is unclear until the end.
  • (4/5)
    Creepy Carrots is a modern fantasy book about Jasper Rabbit. This book is modern fantasy because carrots and bunnies can not talk or walk or do what people do. Jasper Rabbit loves eating carrots. He always wants more and more and each day he goes back to the same field to get another. One day, the carrots came up with a plan, and they began to follow Jasper Rabbit around at night. Jasper gets scared of the carrots and whenever he sees the carrots he tries to show someone that they are following him, but the carrots hide and no one believes that Jasper is seeing carrots. Eventually, Jasper gets tired of being afriad of the carrots, so he decides to build a big wall around the carrot field. After he builds the fence the carrots are excited and throw a party because their plan to keep Jasper from eating them was successful.