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She Who Remembers

She Who Remembers

Écrit par Linda Lay Shuler

Raconté par Cris Dukehart


She Who Remembers

Écrit par Linda Lay Shuler

Raconté par Cris Dukehart

évaluations:
4/5 (21 évaluations)
Longueur:
17 heures
Sortie:
Oct 15, 2013
ISBN:
9781480567559
Format:
Livre audio

Description

In an ancient time of fear and superstition, she stood apart because of her unusual blue eyes.

In a land of great stone cities and trackless wilderness, she sought her own unique path. But it was with the clan that accepted her - and in the heart of the magic man who saved her - that she found her ultimate destiny. Her name was Kwani. But legend would call her

She Who Remembers...
Sortie:
Oct 15, 2013
ISBN:
9781480567559
Format:
Livre audio

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4.1
21 évaluations / 7 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    Very much like Clan of the Cave Bear except the first few chapters would've been dragged out to one whole book for Jean M. Auel!Really enjoyed this, didn't want to put it down.Didn't always agree with Kwani's behaviour and she seemed to get through men (Wopio, Ute, Kokopelli, Okalake and Tolonqua) but she was a compelling character.Will have to read the sequels. Book versions are hard to get hold of but can get cheap ebook copies.
  • (5/5)
    The author has a wonderful imagination and knowledge of history.
  • (1/5)
    There is action in the book and it doesn’t really drag on. I’ll probably read the next book in the series. The main thing I disliked is the flatness of the dialogue and the heroine is always magically saved at the last minute in every misfortune that happens to her. I felt mostly nothing for the characters. It could have been good if the characters weren’t so flat.
  • (1/5)
    I didn't get past the first 60 pages. Just wasn't my thing. The symbolism was stretching a bit too much. I thought it odd to not only tell the reader what the main character was thinking and feeling, but also the mountain lion... struck me as offputting and assumed the rest would dissapoiny as well.
    Thanks to the person who did take the time to give me a recommendation
  • (5/5)
    Kwani is a Navaho or Anasazi Indian of the Southwest Pueblo people who is banished from her home when sickness strikes her tribe. Because she has blue eyes, she is accused of being a witch and is blamed for the people's illness. The real reason for her blue eyes, however, is because she is descended from Vikings who had arrived in the area in the eleventh century. When Kwani is injured, she is rescued by Kokopelli, a famous Toltec trader, who leaves her with another tribe while she recovers. He says he will return in the spring, but when he does not, she has a relationship with Okalake, the man who's family took her in, which is taboo. Okalake must leave and is killed by an Apache. When Kokopelli returns, he brings a Viking explorer with him and has plans to take Kwani back with him to Mexico, even though she is pregnant with Okalake's child. On their travels they meet Tolonqua, a Pueblo Indian from another tribe, who falls in love with Kwani. He feels that they were destined to meet and promises to protect her and be the father of her child. Kokopelli realizes that Kwani would not fit into his culture in Mexico, and has no desire to raise Okalake's son, so he leaves Kwani and her son in the protection of Tolonqua. This book was introduced to me by a customer at the book store where I work. She said that when she read this story, she knew it was the story of her ancestor. Her grandmother had told the story about an ancestor who had blue eyes, and the names of the characters were similar to the names of her ancestors. She says that to this day, blue eyes occur in her family every other generation. Ms. Shuler has done a wonderful job with the historical aspects of this story. She interlaces the history of the Pueblo people, their customs, homes, artifacts, environment, traditions, and stories into this story to make it a great piece of historical fiction.
  • (5/5)
    This book was amazing and appeased me while waiting for earth childrens series to come out with another. I'm so glad I found this series.
  • (4/5)
    Good book, kept my interest. History of early Native Americans. Spiritual.