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True (...Sort Of)

True (...Sort Of)

Écrit par Katherine Hannigan

Raconté par Danielle Ferland


True (...Sort Of)

Écrit par Katherine Hannigan

Raconté par Danielle Ferland

évaluations:
4/5 (5 évaluations)
Longueur:
6 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jun 7, 2011
ISBN:
9780062111272
Format:
Livre audio

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Description

True: Delly Pattison likes surpresents (presents that are a surprise). The day the Boyds come to town, Delly's sure a special surpresent is on its way. But lately, everything that she thinks will be good and fun turns into trouble. She's never needed a surpresent more than now.

True: Brud Kinney wants to play basketball like nothing anybody's ever seen. When the Boyds arrive, though, Brud meets someone who plays like nothing he's ever seen.

True: Ferris Boyd isn't like anyone Delly or Brud have ever met. Ferris is a real mysturiosity (an extremely curious mystery).

True: Katherine Hannigan's first novel since her acclaimed Ida B is a compelling look at the ways friendships and truths are discovered.

It's all true (...sort of).

A HarperAudio production.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jun 7, 2011
ISBN:
9780062111272
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre


À propos de l'auteur

Katherine Hannigan studied mathematics, painting, and studio art and has worked as the education coordinator for a Head Start program and, most recently, as an assistant professor of art and design. She is the author of True (. . . Sort Of), Emmaline and the Bunny, and the national bestseller Ida B . . . and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World. She lives in Iowa with a bunch of cats and the occasional bunny or bird visitor. Her backyard hosts an additional array of creatures, including deer, raccoons, possums, and sometimes a skunk. But no alligators . . . yet!

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3.8
5 évaluations / 5 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    Memorable story, I recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    Delly, who's always in trouble, finds some secrets to staying out of trouble through a friendship with a mute girl in her class, Ferris Boyd. Ferris is the victim of undescribed abuse by her father, but neither girl has the speech or knowhow to get help. I found that Delly's word inventions became too cute and unbelievable pretty quickly, but perhaps the middle grade audience would not be annoyed.
  • (3/5)
    Fifth grader Delly has been T-R-O-U-B-L-E ever since she can remember. But when she meets a mysterious new classmate who doesn't talk and won't be touched, Delly's life is forever changed. Ferris Boyd helps her so much, but can Delly help Ferris when it's needed?Delly's whimsical vocabulary and way of speaking was fun at first, but wore at me a little over the course of so many pages. It's a great story about a troublemaker becoming more self-aware and realizing that the world doesn't center around her. But it's a little overlong and I was TOLD too many times exactly what Delly was feeling instead of seeing it for myself. For the whimsical turns of phrase and near magical realism, I'd recommend it to fans of SAVVY by Ingrid Law. For the troublemaker trying to put things right, I'd recommend it to fans of JOEY PIGZA SWALLOWED THE KEY by Jack Gantos or THE GREAT GILLY HOPKINS by Katherine Paterson.
  • (4/5)
    A very readable book about a girl who gets into trouble. The author does a good job of evoking this age and the trouble that comes with it. Delaware, who is prone to fighting, is helped by her gentle younger brother who teaches her to count her way out of the urge to fight. She is also intrigued by a lonely looking girl, often mistaken for a boy, who seems to have an ability to befriend animals. She starts to follow the girl home, and spies her playing basketball, not Delly's favorite activity. but it gives her the idea, back at school when made captain of a basketball team to choose the girl for the team. But instead of slam-dunking the team to a win, as Delly fantasized her doing, the girl just stands there, letting the ball bounce right off her, losing the game. When Delly asks the mute girl why she did this, the girl writes "You didn't ask." So asking replaces counting, which Delly hated anyway, as a way to keep her out of trouble. The two become friends, along with Delly's little brother, and they have a great time in the girl's hideaway in the woods, not always communicating with words. The fun is interrupted by visits by the girl's father, and Delly comes to realize that there may be more trouble going on than she realizes. I did enjoy the trouble of this age. I could relate! What I did think was a bit of a stretch, honestly, was the amount of compassion shown by kids this age. It seemed a touch unrealistic. In my experience, troubled kids, while they often turn it around eventually, usually don't do it quite this fast. that is my experience, and I know kids come in great variety, obviously, and some are naturally more compassionate than others. I just know, that when I was making trouble, was pretty self centered and it took me years to change. It is a nice book though, and I enjoyed reading it, and I think kids will, too.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this book about a girl who gets in trouble even though her intentions are good. About her friendship with a troubled girl and how they help each other. Good brother/sister relationship too.