Découvrez votre prochain livre audio préféré

Devenez membre dès aujourd'hui et écoutez gratuitement pendant 30 jours
Grandfather's Journey

Grandfather's Journey

Écrit par Allen Say

Raconté par B. D. Wong


Grandfather's Journey

Écrit par Allen Say

Raconté par B. D. Wong

évaluations:
4/5 (53 évaluations)
Longueur:
8 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2008
ISBN:
9780545667432
Format:
Livre audio

Description

Through compelling reminiscences of his grandfather’s life in the United States and Japan, Allen Say poignantly recounts his familys' journey to America. The feelings of being torn by a love for two different countries are sensitively expressed.
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2008
ISBN:
9780545667432
Format:
Livre audio


À propos de l'auteur

Allen Say was born in Yokohama, Japan, in 1937. He dreamed of becoming a cartoonist from the age of six, and, at age twelve, apprenticed himself to his favorite cartoonist, Noro Shinpei. For the next four years, Say learned to draw and paint under the direction of Noro, who has remained Say's mentor. Say illustrated his first children's book -- published in 1972 -- in a photo studio between shooting assignments. For years, Say continued writing and illustrating children's books on a part-time basis. But in 1987, while illustrating THE BOY OF THE THREE-YEAR NAP (Caldecott Honor Medal), he recaptured the joy he had known as a boy working in his master's studio. It was then that Say decided to make a full commitment to doing what he loves best: writing and illustrating children's books. Since then, he has written and illustrated many books, including TREE OF CRANES and GRANDFATHER'S JOURNEY, winner of the 1994 Caldecott Medal. He is a full-time writer and illustrator living in Portland, Oregon.

Lié à Grandfather's Journey

Livres audio associé

Avis

Ce que les gens pensent de Grandfather's Journey

4.1
53 évaluations / 80 Avis
Qu'avez-vous pensé ?
Évaluation : 0 sur 5 étoiles

Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    Really, really liked this - will definitely be getting it for children in hard copy.
  • (5/5)
    Allen Say takes you through the journey of his grandfather's life. He moves from Japan to the US and travels seeing as much as he can. He misses home and returns to Japan, there he misses California. Allen makes you understand his grandfather's love of both of his homes through his constant homesickness of the other. He inherits these same feelings for both homes as well.
  • (5/5)
    I LOVED this book! It touched on issues of homesickness, having to live in a country that is not your homeland, and issues of family and family identity. Additionally, the story depicts in a very human way the culture of Japan and America and how they differ.
  • (4/5)
    I did like this book a lot, but I think that it will better appreciated by adults than by children. I really liked this tribute to a man's grandfather who had a wanderlust and who loved two places, his hometown in Japan and his home in California. I do love the illustrations that are present in this book, They are gorgeous yet simple, and they capture the places of the story perfectly. It tells the story itself about a young man's life, as he grows up, starts a family and passes his story onto his children and grandchildren. The narrative was also well written. It was simple, with no more than two sentences per page. I think that this would be good for the younger readers but they would have to know about the background knowledge of immigration and emigration. This is a good book for individuals who have tried to move from one culture to another and find themselves falling in love with one country while missing the other.
  • (3/5)
    This story really captures the cross-cultural dynamic the grandfather faced when trying to decide which country he loved the most, Japan or the United States. His journey became a part of his legacy which allows students an insight into another culture. Many students reading this story probably have not experienced anything like this grandfather has so it's a great introduction to accepting new ideas. I do feel that this story would resonate better with older children and even adults because I think it is a lot to understand for younger children. The illustrations followed the story.
  • (3/5)
    One of the most striking things about Grandfather's Journey is how the stoicism of this Japanese man is very much so an excellent example of their culture. The somewhat introverted nature of this character not only captures a snapshot of their culture, but also how much Grandfather was separated and, at times, marginalized. Because of the implicit nature of this book, it may have to be explained to younger readers. Older readers may get these non-verbal cues, but the sparse nature of the text of the book may leave them disinterested.
  • (2/5)
    This was a historical fiction picture book about a Japanese man who couldn't decide if he wanted to live in US or Japan. He says at the end 'when he gets to one place, he begins to miss and feel homesick for the other'. It would be best for 2nd graders. It isn't something I would recommend because I think there are better books for immigration and Japanese -Americans.
  • (4/5)
    I liked the multicultural book, Grandfather's Journey by Allen Say because both readers in Japan and America can relate to it. The book explores both areas and explains why both places are so special. I also loved that I did not know who was speaking until half way through the book; it added a different perspective to the text.
  • (3/5)
    I really enjoyed how this book had very little words with large illustrations. It makes readers realize how much the grandfather loved to travel. Rather than just describe his journey with words, the author decides to describe it with illustrations, which can depict much more than words. The illustrations also help readers with comprehension because each picture matched up with the few words on that page. The central meaning in this book is traveling.Summary: The book starts off by telling us about the Grandfather's past. He grew up in Japan. However, he traveled by boat to America for the first time. His favorite state was California. He then moved back to Japan to marry his high school sweet heart. After his daughter grew up, she got married and had a son. Ever since the boy was young, he wanted to follow his grandfathers footsteps and go to California. He found this possible after his grandfather died and soon found out why California was his grandfather's favorite state.
  • (2/5)
    I did not like this book too much. I feel like this book was too unrealistic. I felt this way because there was no talk of how the grandfather got any money to do all of the things he was doing. I feel like someone would need a great deal of money to go from Japan to America and then back with a wife and to buy a new house for the daughter to grow up with. However, the book just says that he does all of these things and does not explain how. What I felt was best about this story was its illustrations. I feel like the illustrator did a wonderful job capturing how the grandfather aged from the beginning of the book up to where he died in the book. The amount of detail was amazing and I really loved the imagery used when the grandfather was on his deathbed. The big picture of this book was to show how culture is something you cannot escape and you might miss it if you leave the culture you grew up in. When the grandfather explored America, American culture became a part of him too. That is why the grandson said he felt like he knew his grandfather more once he was able to visit america too.
  • (5/5)
    This was a wonderful book. The story of Allen Say's own grandfather is beautiful and brief and perfect. I can't imagine improving on it except to change the course of history and give his grandfather a chance to return one last time to California. The references to WWII were interesting, especially since he was referring to Yokohama where the U.S. bombed repeatedly though not by the atomic bombs that were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Say's writing and illustrations are both beautiful and I enjoyed the book immensely.
  • (4/5)
    Allen Say retells the story of his grandfather's journey from Japan to America. Say's grandfather falls in love with traveling and explore various parts of the United States before settling in California. After a while in California, Say's grandfather longs to go back to Japan. The grandfather realizes that when he is in Japan he misses California and vice versa. Once Say travels to California for the first time, he realizes how he grandfather always felt homesick for the place where he was not. I like this because it shows the wonders of travel. Through the book, Say's love and admiration for his grandfather is very evident.
  • (5/5)
    A Japanese American man recounts his grandfather's journey to America which he later also endures, and the feelings of being torn by a love for two different countries. As a winner of the Caldecott Medal, the illustrations of this book are enchanting for the reader. This story will introduce young readers to historical concepts of America and Japan, such as WWII, and the beauty from Japan.
  • (3/5)
    After reading "Grandfather's Journey" by Allen Say, I thought the book did indeed have many good traits. I liked how it portrayed to the reader a real sense of family, as it moved down in generations from the Grandfather, to his family, to his grandson, and even all the way down to his grandson's child in the end. Their family held so much history, between traveling back from Japan to the United States, and raising different members of the family in different settings. I believe that it gives kids the incentive after hearing this book, to maybe go home and inquire more about their own family. I can also see it being a good book in a classroom where possibly one or more students in the classroom are from a different country as well. It could be a good way to show how everyone has a different history, a different upbringing, and it just goes to show that differences make the world go round. All in all, I thought "Grandfather's Journey" was a very worthwhile read, and would recommend this multicultural book to any interested in what it's story holds!
  • (5/5)
    The illustration in this book were amazing. This is a book I will recommend. It explains why it is so hard for people to leave their homeland even when the current situation there is not good. Love of homeland, your roots and your culture is a very different thing than politics. This is a warm and touching story.
  • (5/5)
    A Japanese-American man recounts his grandfather's journey to America, which he later undertakes himself, and the feelings of being torn by a love for two different countries. The whole book is like your grandmother sitting you on her lap telling you stories while you flip through a photo album. Rich language and beautiful illustrations bring this memoir-like story to life. I would use this book as a mentor text for figurative language.
  • (5/5)
    This Caldecott winner is a wonderful educational experience for children, providing a story of the immigrant experience.Based on the true story of the author's grandfather, the book is a loving memory of his wise, brave relative.When a young man, leaving Japan to venture to the United States, Allen Say's grandfather eventually lived in California.When he returned to Japan, he married his childhood sweetheart and brought her to the United States. Living in San Francisco, they had a beautiful baby daughter.Longing for Japan, in his older years, the grandfather returned to Japan. When an adult, his daughter married and the author was born in Japan.Living in Japan, and now missing California, the grandfather longed to return once again to the US. Unfortunately, war broke out and he never had the opportunity to see the loveliness of a state he loved.Most interesting was the detailed emotions of longing for one place, living in another and then a re-occurring conflict of not knowing which place was truly home.Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Allen Say's picture books are always somewhat autobiographical. Grandfather's Journey is no different as it tells of his grandfather's life in the United States and his return to Japan.As a young man, Allen's grandfather traveled to the United States. Through odd jobs he worked his way across the country. Says gorgeous paintings show his grandfather against many different American landmarks and landscapes. My favorite shows the small figure of his grandfather against the massive shapes of Monument Valley.Later though, the grandfather had settled in San Francisco. He married and the had a daughter (Say's mother). Being a parent changes one, makes one nostalgic. He made the decision to move back to Japan. It was there that Say was later born and raised.Say's story isn't just a biography of his grandfather. It is also an exploration of life and death and that sense of home. Say like his grandfather, calls both Japan and California his home. He says that bouncing homesickness as he travels has made him understand his grandfather and miss him.Grandfather's Journey is a good introduction to different pieces of recent history. It also could be used to enhance a geography lesson or a genealogy one.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book to kids to get them asking asking questions about worlds outside of there own and to see what they value about their home.
  • (5/5)
    This book connected a grandfather and a grandson by the life story of the grandfathers journey. The grandfather wanted to be in two different places at one time.
  • (4/5)
    Well written autobiography of Allen Say (authors) take on his grandfathers life. Allen and his grandfather were both born in Japan. His grandfathers left Japan and fell in love with America, especially California. He eventually moved to California then back to Japan. Allen visits California after his grandfather passes and sees why his grandfather loved both countries.
  • (4/5)
    The genre of this book is biography/autobiography. It tells the tale of the author, Allen Say's grandfather's journey to the New World, which is America from Japan. His grandfather had many adventures in the new world, and eventually settled down in California with his wife from Japan. Even though his grandfather loved his new home, he still missed the world he had grew up in: Japan. After his daughter had grown, the grandfather took his small family back to Japan, which is where Say grew up. Say, too, in turn, moved to California, who found out that he, just like his grandfather, missed his old home in Japan.
  • (5/5)
    The pictures are wonderful; each one can stand on its own as a work of art. A very brief summary of the author's grandfather's life is combined with a realization that both of them feel connected to both California and Japan, two very different parts of the world.
  • (4/5)
    I could really relate to this touching story that shows the personal conflict of people who leave home to make a new life in another country. This shows how one may always yearn for one of their two countries. I think that my grandparents always thought of Poland as home, even though they spent most of their lives here, happily. I especially enjoyed how Say juxtaposes pictures to contrast the features and cultures of the U.S. and Japan and how the images carry the theme of family heritage & following in the footsteps of your grandparents.







  • (3/5)
    Sure it's beautiful and poignant - but I just can't imagine even older children (much less toddlers, who are the default target for picture-books) liking it, and I didn't feel enough depth for me as an adult.
  • (4/5)
    Grandfather's Journey opens up the classroom discussion to Japanese culture, immigration, and the idea of being torn between wanting to exist in two places. Asking students to relate to the story by encouraging them to tell their personal immigration stories allows students to add their cultural heritage to the classroom learning experience.
  • (5/5)
    Grandfather's Journey is simply beautiful. The illustrations are true works of art. The story is both hopeful and heartbreaking. Moving forward and yet longing for the past is a theme everyone can relate to whether or not one has moved from one country to another. This story can be used to discuss immigration, war, culture, and even time itself. It is my opinion that the story reaches all age levels and social and cultural backgrounds. America is a land of immigrants. Most all Americans have a roots in another land.
  • (5/5)
    Say tells a story of an Asian American immigrant's grandfather who inspired him to do the same thing as he did. This book helps reader to gain more awareness on the Asian American community. The narrative nature of the story and the use of easy-to-understand words keeps reader engaged.
  • (5/5)
    A very touching story of a young boy's grandfather's journey to America. Through a shared longing for both their homeland and the new land, the boy comes to know his grandfather at a deeper level. With beautiful illustrations, this book paints a beautiful portrait of how immigrants to the United States feel caught between two worlds with no real "home" as they are so connected to two spaces. This book has some beautiful descriptive language of the places both in China and across the United States. It also captures the emotion of the characters very well through words the author uses to describe feeling, rather than simple representing it in pictures. It is a more advanced text for older readers.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed reading this book. I did not think I was going to like it however, the author's portrayal of his grandfather's journey from Japan to America was very intricately written. Allen Say includes many details in his writing that engages readers. He includes facts and background of Japanese immigrants to appeal to the reader. As Allen's grandfather comes to America, he experiences its beauty, visiting many states. He visits mountains and plains. The big illustrations on each page accurately depict the be beautiful story being portrayed.