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Jackaby

Jackaby

Écrit par William Ritter

Raconté par Nicola Barber


Jackaby

Écrit par William Ritter

Raconté par Nicola Barber

évaluations:
4/5 (80 évaluations)
Longueur:
7 heures
Sortie:
Sep 16, 2014
ISBN:
9781622314836
Format:
Livre audio

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Description

Newly arrived in New Fiddleham, New England, 1890, and in need of a job, Abigail Rook meets R. F. Jackaby, an investigator of the unexplained with a keen eye for the extraordinary—including the ability to see supernatural beings. Abigail has a gift for noticing ordinary but important details, which makes her perfect for the position of Jackaby's assistant.

On her first day, Abigail finds herself in the midst of a thrilling case: A serial killer is on the loose. The police are convinced it's an ordinary villain, but Jackaby is certain the foul deeds are the work of the kind of creature whose very existence the local police seem adamant to deny.

While Abigail finds herself drawn to Jackaby's keen intelligence and his sensitivity to phenomena others barely perceive, her feelings are confused by the presence of Charlie, a handsome young policeman willing to help Jackaby and Abigail on the case. But is Charlie's offer a sincere desire to be of service, or is some darker motive at work.

Sortie:
Sep 16, 2014
ISBN:
9781622314836
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre

À propos de l'auteur

William Ritter is an Oregon author and educator. He is the proud father of the two bravest boys in the Wild Wood, and husband to the indomitable Queen of the Deep Dark.The Oddmireis Ritter’s first series for middle-grade readers. He is also the author of the New York Times bestselling, award-winning Jackaby series for young adult readers. Visit him online at rwillritter.wordpress.com and find him on Twitter: @Willothewords.


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4.0
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    Received from Algonquin Young Readers in exchange for an completely unbiased review.
    Also posted on Silk & Serif

    Want a little alternate history with a paranormal Sherlock Holmes? Something unique and quirky?
    New England, 1892. Abigail Rook has a knack for seeing the ordinary details in the most un-ordinary situations. It's this talent that leads her to become employed by the strange and slightly insane R.F Jackaby.

    When a serial killer begins to commit gruesome murders, striking fear in the residents of New Fiddleham, Jackacky wastes no time in getting involved. Only problem is the Police want New Fiddleham's most bonafide quack detective far away from their crime scenes.

    Meanwhile, Abigail is exposed to plenty of strange creatures and raises the question: just what has she gotten herself into? And does she want to continue being Jackaby's assistant even if it could lead to her death?
    Banshees, were-creatures, psychics and all manner of non-human creatures debut in Ritter's young adult take on Sherlock Holme's murder mystery genre.

    Oh Jackaby, Jackaby.
    I wasn't quite sure what to expect from Jackaby before I started. I guess I expected more macabre and less humour. I'm not sure, but I found myself a bit off kilter once I started reading the first book of William Ritter's Jackaby series. The whole book was sort of like an introduction to Jackaby's world and Ritter's writing style..not that this is a bad thing..both are very crafty and wonderful.

    I was satisfied with the novel in the end and I regret that I didn't pay attention to the smaller details. I've gotten so comfortable reading novels with plenty of filler lines that I missed some really big hints regarding the villain's identity and how he committed the murders. Thankfully, Ritter is kind enough to fill us all in at the end on the clues he sprinkled through out the book - which are really obvious once you finish the book!
    Jackaby harks back to when detective mysteries were cunning and tricky with plenty of hints for readers to pick up on if they are paying close enough attention.
    I loved the unique sense of humour. Jackaby is an odd ball with plenty of eccentricities and often I found myself grinning at the Sherlock Holmes type humour randomly dispersed among general dialogue. Jackaby, like Sherlock Holmes, lacks plenty of social graces and relies on Abigail to try to smooth feathers (not that he's aware he's even being inappropriate!). He's often stuck in his own world, following leads without explaining himself to poor, exasperated Abigail who cannot help but follow.

    I wasn't sure whether I liked Jacaby until I started reading Beastly Bones and realized that Jackaby is only an introduction to a strong and fantastic detective team with some really amazing secondary characters. Honestly, I think this series is only going to get better with time..

    This novel will appeal to Sherlock Holme fans, mystery fans, lovers of young adult paranormal series, tales of alternate histories and unique story telling. Jackaby is an intelligent and witty novel completely unlike anything else on the market, utilizing humour an paranormal investigation to solve mysteries that appear average at first glace.
  • (3/5)
    Jackaby is a YA fantasy story about a young women from around 1900 (I think) who gets a job with a detective who can see supernatural creatures. Right when she’s hired, there’s a supernatural serial killer on the loose. Unfortunately, while Jackaby had a lot of potential, the end result was just bland and largely forgettable.Abigail Rook is the daughter of an English society lady and an archaeologist. Her entire life she’s read tales of adventure and longed to join her father on his digs, despite her parents instance that it is not proper for a young lady. When it comes time for her to go off to higher education, she takes the money for tuition and runs away to join a dig. The experience not being what she hoped, she winds up in America, in need of a job. She soon finds employ with R.F. Jackaby, a detective with supernatural sight. Almost immediately they start investigating a case of a serial killer that Jackaby insists has a supernatural element.The back blurb really should have provided a clue of my end feelings towards this novel: “features a detective of the paranormal as seen through the eyes of his adventurous and intelligent assistant.” Abigail largely exists as a view point character, but she does not do very much outside of being an observer. Given that the book is named after Jackaby and he’s the one featured on the cover, I really should have seen this coming. Still, I feel like you need your narrator to do something.I wasn’t impressed with Abigail, but I also wasn’t very interested in any of the other characters either. Jackaby was a detective in the Sherlock Holms mode with the whole “second sight” twist, but he still ended up feeling like an uninspired character I’d seen before. There’s a few other secondary characters of note – a ghost named Jenny and a police constable who acts as Abigail’s love interest (although there’s not much romance overall). These characters had potential, but they never really captured me either.If there’s one thing good about the book, it has an enjoyable whimsical element and uses folkloric creatures beyond those that you normally see in urban fantasy. There’s kobalds and banshees and not a vampire in sight.Regarding the audio format, the narration mostly pretty good. The author had an accent that went well with Abigail’s background. However, I did find the way she did Jackaby’s voice annoying.Would I recommend Jackaby? I wouldn’t push it into your hands, but I wouldn’t advise against it either. There’s worse books you could read. But then again, there’s also better.Originally posted The Illustrated Page.
  • (5/5)
    Fun, entertaining, and easy read. Now I'm interested in reading the rest of the series.
  • (5/5)
    Discovering Sherlock Holmes was a watershed moment in my reading life, and I have remained enamored of the great detective for years. Many authors have attempted to improve upon Sir Arthur's stories, some with success, some without. I always find myself drawn to these treatments of Holmes and Watson, even when it's not those specific characters in play, but characters drawn in the Holmesian style. So it was with relish that I cracked Jackaby by William Ritter, which features a detective-scientist in the manner of Holmes who operates in New Fiddleham, a growing town located somewhere on the east coast of the United States (could be a young Boston, or New York).

    Two things interested me here: the replacement of the dour John Watson character with Miss Abigail Rook, dinosaur hunter, recently of England, and the inclusion of a supernatural element. We enter the story with Miss Rook's arrival in New Fiddleham from a sea voyage that took her anywhere but home. We come to understand that Abigail, daughter of a famed archaeologist, had grown tired of always being left at home when her father went on digs and so took the money designated to pay her tuition at a young ladies school and scarpered off to dig for dinosaurs in Eastern Europe. When that adventure ended, she got on a boat and ended up in New Fiddleham, still looking for adventure and not a little afraid to go home. She encounters Jackaby in a tavern, where he does the typical Sherlockian assessment and recitation of where she has been, only in this version, he bases his assessment on the fairies and pixies hiding among Abigail clothes, clinging to her in passage to the new world.

    Abigail encounters Jackaby again when she answers an advertisement for an assistant, and finds herself among the oddities in his home, including a frog that dispenses a noxious gas out of its eyes, a neat ghost, and a duck who turns out to be a former assistant to the detective. Abigail and Jackaby are immediately plunged into a grisly murder scene in an apartment house also inhabited by a banshee. There is the usual tension and disrespect between the "amateur" detective and the "real" detective who scoffs at Jackaby's methods (he can "feel" supernatural auras and trails left in the air when these beings pass by). Jackaby immediately discerns that an ancient evil is at work, and predicts more deaths, which, naturally occur until the evil is finally defeated.

    I quite liked the characters here. Abigail is a spunky, smart young woman who is not intimidated by the oftentimes overbearing Jackaby. The great man himself is somewhat endearing and very entertaining. The supporting characters, especially the young policeman Charlie Cain and Jackaby's live-in ghost Jenny, are interesting and deserve more attention in any future entries in this series. The supernatural elements were not the usual withes, vampires, or werewolves, but unusual creatures drawn from British and world folklore. The identity and origin of the "ancient evil" is a clever and unusual bit of British/Scottish lore that I cannot recall being used anywhere else. The writing is crisp, and the plot moves along very nicely. I sincerely hope we will see more of Jackaby and Abigail Rook in the future. Highly recommended.
  • (3/5)
    Before I read Jackaby, I saw it described it as "Doctor Who meets Sherlock." That was enough to convince me to read it. I'm a huge Doctor Who fan, and I totally pictured David Tennant as Jackaby the entire time I read the book. It felt very much like Doctor Who fan fiction but with different names. I don't mean any of that in a bad way, either.

    I always find myself being influenced by others' opinions of a book, and I really did enjoy Jackaby, so I'm writing a review before I read any others. I enjoyed the characters, the plot was intriguing, and I loved the inclusion of supernatural elements. I always enjoy books that make me want to go do research afterwards, and there are lots of mythical creatures to learn about now!

    I do want to point out that about halfway through the story, I already knew who the culprit was. I'm generally not good at solving mysteries, and so on, but this one was easy to figure out. It was a young adult novel, though, so I guess that makes sense.
  • (2/5)
    I wish I liked this book. It has all the elements that would make me think I SHOULD like it.

    The audiobook just never captured my attention though. It was short and quick so I may one day reread it to see if I like it more. I can't explain my distaste. I just was never grabbed by it. I put it down easily and without much thought for such a short audiobook.

    I'm not totally against maybe trying the second book eventually but for now I'm sitting here sad I didn't love it more.
  • (3/5)
    Before I read Jackaby, I saw it described it as "Doctor Who meets Sherlock." That was enough to convince me to read it. I'm a huge Doctor Who fan, and I totally pictured David Tennant as Jackaby the entire time I read the book. It felt very much like Doctor Who fan fiction but with different names. I don't mean any of that in a bad way, either.

    I always find myself being influenced by others' opinions of a book, and I really did enjoy Jackaby, so I'm writing a review before I read any others. I enjoyed the characters, the plot was intriguing, and I loved the inclusion of supernatural elements. I always enjoy books that make me want to go do research afterwards, and there are lots of mythical creatures to learn about now!

    I do want to point out that about halfway through the story, I already knew who the culprit was. I'm generally not good at solving mysteries, and so on, but this one was easy to figure out. It was a young adult novel, though, so I guess that makes sense.
  • (5/5)
    This book was a pure delight to read. Once I started it I didn't want to put it down. I enjoyed Jackaby and Ms. Rook. I also enjoyed the supporting characters. The supernatural elements and the detective aspects made for a enjoyable and fun read. I can't wait to read the next book in the series.
  • (5/5)
    Move over Sherlock, there is a new detective in town and his name is Jackaby. Abigail Rook makes an excellent younger, less experienced side-kick/real world perspective character. With a dash of banshee, werewolf and redcap thrown in as well as a resident ghost and a duck with shall we say issues, Jackaby by William Ritter is quick, can't put down read!
  • (4/5)
    Newly arrived in New Fiddleham, New England, 1892, and in need of a job, Abigail Rook meets R. F. Jackaby, an investigator of the unexplained with a keen eye for the extraordinary-including the ability to see supernatural beings. Abigail has a gift for noticing ordinary but important details, which makes her perfect for the position of Jackaby's assistant. On her first day, Abigail finds herself in the midst of a thrilling case: A serial kiler is on the loose. the police are convinced it's an ordinary villain, but Jackaby is certain the foul deeds are the work of the kind of creature whose very existence the local authorities-with the exception of a handsome young detective named Charlie Cane-seem adamant to deny. - back cover of book What a well written blend of plucky protagonist, scenes of mystery and danger, aptly described characters who take a page from the Sherlock Holmes tradition and add a supernatural quirkiness. Wonderful! highly recommended for teens who enjoy mysteries or are Sherlock Holmes-1890s era fans.
  • (3/5)
    Not quite 3 stars for me, but I decided to round up.
  • (2/5)
    Although well written I didn't not care for the actual storyline itself. The author did a great job keeping the suspense up and the story plugging on, but the events and characters were just 'off'. I couldn't help but picturing Johnny Depp as Jackaby himself.
  • (4/5)
    This was a fast paced/easy read, and definitely a book I enjoyed. The Sherlock-iness of Jackaby was highly entertaining, and I loved Miss Rook's character - she wanted to be an adventurer in a time where women didn't have adventures and she made it happen! Great role model for sure! After reading/listening to some books with heavy subject matter, this was a somewhat lighter book for me...full of wonder with all the different creatures that Jackaby can see, the odd murders - I love a good "who done it" murder mystery - and the supernatural elements were very quirky and entertaining! I look forward to the rest of the series!#punkrocklibrarian #overdrive #audiobook
  • (4/5)
    A Young Adult book, historical fantasy set in 1890 features Abigail Rook, a young girl who doesn't follow the rigid gender roles. She wants adventure. Her desire finds her in the USA and she takes a job as assistant to the eccentric Jackaby, a paranormal investigator. The book is filled with folklore, mythology, religion and the supernatural along side a detective in the Sherlock Holmes style. Overall, a fun read, but simple and easy to figure out so not much of a mystery. But a book I would recommend to young people. Georgia Peach Book Award Nominee for Honor book (2015), The Magnolia Award Nominee for 9-12 (2016)Rating:3.625
  • (5/5)
    Because I got lucky and got the second in the Jackaby series to review, I decided to read the first book in the series so that I have some background and reference for when I actually review the second book. *contains spoilers*Being a fan of Sherlock on PBS and detective stories in general, I was very pleased with this debut novel from the new writer. The character of R.F. Jackaby is very similar to that of our favorite (modern) detective, having interesting quirks like a crazy mismatched hat and very, very long scarf, speaking his mind, and eventually getting lost in deep thought. The general public thinks he's nuts, uncanny, and consider him uncouth. However, what I probably like the most is that the point of view is from not Jackaby, but his assistant (and eventual detective) Abigail Rook. The reader gets a look at what Jackaby is through her mind and opinions. She's a young woman who's only ever been told that it's not proper for a lady to do this or that. Yet she has a thirst and yearning for adventure and the undiscovered. So she did what every young woman would do: take her 1st semester's tuition and go on a dinosaur dig in Eastern Europe. While she braved the elements, dirt, and menswear, it wasn't enough. So because she has such a unique background herself (from that of any other traditional lady), I think her and Jackaby compliment each other. I like how the author makes his opinions blunt for Abigail, and more importantly - that it's not an issue of gender. Jackaby considers himself extraordinary, and then there's everyone else, no matter what you're sex, color, or the like. I also applaud the author for not making Jackaby the love interest of Abigail in this book. I feel that, especially in YA books, young women are expected to just have love interests and make up their minds about who they love if there is more than one. If the novel is meant to be a romance, then that's fine. But every YA novel doesn't need a young woman falling in love all the time. A girl can have a good adventure without falling in love, and again applaud the author for not falling into the trap. It made the story better overall. The plot itself twists and turns. Abigail's new adventure and process of getting acclimated in a new country is contrasted with the murder case and the suspense throughout. I didn't feel that there was a lull within the story; in fact, I was intrigued by the more fractioned bits of the story such as the omission of the chapter and the additional notes at the end of the novel. The tone was spot on - it wasn't too bleak or ridiculous. On William Ritter's author page, he describes his influences as Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett and the reader can clearly see that influence throughout. Stories are weaved into more stories and the fantastical and real collide in such a beautiful way that it's almost like poetry. I would have thought that Abigail would have been screaming for half the novel, upon discovering that fairies, shapeshifters, goblins, and ghosts exist. The fact that she accepts it so easily only adds to her depth as a character. The atmosphere and general tone of the story is well rounded; I think an even match of sadness, intrigue, and discovery is incorporated to keep the reader captivated (I know I was). The fact that it took place in America during what most consider to be a Victorian-like age (late 1890s) gives the scene more moodiness and mystery. All in all, I have no complaints about the novel - except one. I wish that, when Abigail opens the parcel and discovers that Jackaby has given her the notebook that she so desperately wanted, she should have given him a hug. A hug speaks ten thousand times more than just "thank you". But then again, maybe because it's Jackaby, she knew better. As full disclosure, I not read this book but rather "read" it as an audiobook. I thought the young woman who did the reading, Nicola Barber, had a marvelous accent and I can't wait to hear her voice read the second book from the series.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. From the first line until the last, it was wonderful, whimsical, and exactly the kind of book that I love to read! Jackaby is a marvelous character, and Miss Abigail Rook is the perfect foil. Tired of her rigid 19th century life in which well bred British girls never seem to be allowed to go out and experience life. Abigail decides to take matters in her own hands. Without her parents knowledge she leaves her boarding school and sets out to find some adventure, eventually making her way to New England and, in her search for work, R.F. Jackaby, who is advertising for an assistant to help him in his detective work. A young Sherlock Holmes type with a sharp mind, an eye for detail, and a vast knowledge of the supernatural, Jackaby intrigues Abigail from the very start and she is quickly pulled along into an investigation of a series of gruesome murders that leave a strong sense of something inhuman as the perpetrator. A wailing banshee is their only clue to the next victim in a string of brutal killings that leave such odd clues, that even the cynical police detective in charge doesn't know what to make of them. What he does know is that he finds Jackaby strange, annoying, and too often right in his deductions. Aside from a wonderfully good supernatural mystery that kept me guessing until the very end, and then still surprised me, Ritter has created such a visual and delightful world. His description of the pond in Jackaby's house...the way it ripples and how the shadows on the ceiling create an atmosphere of serenity made me wish I too could dip my toes into the water and feed Douglas bits of bread while watching reflections of the ripples on the ceiling. The resident ghost who becomes a friend, the duck who no longer wants to be a man, preferring, it seems, to remaining a duck, and a frog that no one should stare at if they know what's good for them... it all combines to make a world so richly detailed and vibrant that I had no problem seeing it all inside my head. The writing is well paced and a good mixture of humour and pathos. The character are well drawn and a good match for each other, with Abigail being plucky and brave, and noticing the mundane details that help pull everything together. It all felt very well balanced and the historical setting and language made it all that much more enjoyable. Can't wait to start the sequel, which I just purchased yesterday!
  • (4/5)
    Book one in a terrific YA series that combines a Victorian sensibility and setting to a New England town rife with mysterious deaths, supernatural creatures and other unexplained mayhem. Luckily, paranormal private investigator R. F. Jackaby and his pragmatic new assistant, Miss Abigail Rook, are there to set things right. However, as Miss Rook so deftly observes, Mr. Jackaby himself is every bit as confounding as the mysteries they are trying to solve.
  • (4/5)
    "Miss Rook, I am not an occultist," Jackaby said. "I have a gift that allows me to see truth where others see the illusion--and there are many illusions. All the world's a stage, as they say, and I seem to have the only seat in the house with a view behind the curtain." Abigail Rook has always wanted adventure. Fresh off a failed attempt to infiltrate an archaeological dig, she finds herself in a town in New England, desperately searching for a job. She stumbles onto an advertisement seeking an assistant, and finds herself suddenly working for R.F. Jackaby, a seer who solves mysteries the police can't quite seem to figure out themselves.I have heard this book described as Sherlock Holmes meets Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and I would say that is definitely accurate. The supernatural elements are expertly woven into the mystery, which lends a creepy and fascinating atmosphere to the book itself. The ending has a great twist, and no part of the book disappoints.I look forward to reading more books in this series!
  • (4/5)
    When Abigail Rook arrives in New England in 1892 seeking adventure, she immediately sets out to find employment. The job she finds is not what she expected, but exactly what she wanted. She is assistant to the detective R.F. Jackaby, a seer who can sense the supernatural and solve crimes committed in the human world by creatures most people can't even see.
  • (5/5)
    Well that was utterly delightful in every possible way.
  • (3/5)
    If you like Rick Yancey's Monstrumologist and Jonathan Stroud's Lock & Co. you'll like this book; which I do!
  • (4/5)
    I adored this book. Yes, some parts were a bit childish or slow, but overall I really, really enjoyed it. It has a good story line, kept me interested, and I just loved Jackaby's character. This genre is right up my alley though so I figured I would like it. I would recommend this to preteens on up to adults. Well worth the quick read. 4.5 out of 5 stars. I will read it again, I'm sure.
  • (4/5)
    Favorite part of this novel: the oddball humor. Some of the off the cuff lines and jokes the author incorporates had me laughing out loud more than once. I mean, how our two main characters meet! LOL Jackaby mentions that it would be an impolite invasion of privacy to read her luggage labels, yet right after uttering those words he's picking lint right off her jacket and eating it!?!?! It's just off the wall encounters like that that set the tone for this novel. Yes, there's a murder/mystery going on, horrid death scenes, and a bunch of supernatural stuff happening, but it's the humor that strikes me as so unique.The story was fairly well told and plotted out. The murder/mystery stuff had me guessing for most of the book, though I had faint glimmers about the culprit was a few times throughout the book. I loved all the supernatural elements. The author presents them in such way that just makes them so normal and yet so unique. I mean, it's not too many books that can combine a late Victorian mystery with a troll living under a bridge, an island/pond combination in the attic, a former assistant turned into waterfowl, and pooping kobolds. And make all that into a coherent and engrossing storyline. The characters were pretty vivid. I especially enjoyed Abigail. She had pluck and courage to be dumped into the extremely odd world of Jackaby and the supernatural. She handles the strangeness with a straightforward approach to it all and a practicality and common sense that I really admired. Jackaby, on the other hand, I didn't enjoy as much. I was reminded of why I didn't like Sherlock Holmes that much; Jackaby reminds me much of him. He's a bit too confident, a bit too condescending, a bit too much of a "shut up and do what I tell you" kind of approach to mystery-solving. I'm sure that probably wasn't the author's intent, to make him such an ass munch. But that's how he came across to this reader.This is a very promising debut. The author is able to combine supernatural elements, humor, a good story, and good characters into a overall package that is very engrossing. And while I could have done without some of the characterization points of the main lead, it didn't detract from my overall enjoyment. I'd highly recommend this one to those who enjoy a good supernatural mystery now and then.Note: Book received via GoodReads FirstReads program for free in exchange for an honest review.
  • (4/5)
    Jackaby's story is told from the point of view of Abigail Rook, a young and educated English girl. who decided to leave school in search for an education through archeological digs. Her father is a palentologist but recommended that she finish her schooling and find a husband to care for her. Instead, Abigail absconded with her tuition money to join an archeological dig which went bankrupt. Abigail then decided to try her luck in America where she meets young Jackaby, a self proclaimed detective with the ability to find and see supernatural creatures.Jackaby is young, arrogant, disturbingly observant - much like a young American Sherlock Holmes dedicated to reason and science which he uses to explain illusions and supernatural phenomena. Rook is funny, spirited, and equally observant; she's an excellent foil for Jackaby and a valuable assistant. "Jackaby sees things more extraordinary still, the things that no one else sees. But Rook - Rook notices mailboxes and wastebaskets and . . . and people. One who can see the ordinary is extraordinary indeed." So, Rook is hired as Jackaby's assistant.As a Sherlock Holmes type character, Jackaby does get a lot of teasing from Abigail Rook, Chief Inspector Marlowe, and the people that he encounters. While Jackaby does get respect, the ribbing he suffers adds to the fun. The murder mystery that makes up Jackaby's main case comes with a strange map, a banshee, goblins, and other supernatural creatures. Still, the detective skills used to find and interpret the clues are based in reason. ISBN-10: 1616203536 - Hardcover $16.95Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers (September 16, 2014), 304 pages.Review copy courtesy of the publisher and NetGalley.
  • (3/5)
    Jackaby is a pleasant mix of Sherlock Holmes and Dresden files set in early America. Quick witted and manic at times, I especially enjoyed the speed at which this book progresses. Funny at times and not overly morose, Jackaby will strike a chord with any supernatural reading fan. The story itself is interesting but a bit weak. The plot was predictable but I had a great time getting to the end and seeing what the resolution was.
  • (4/5)
    A book described as Doctor Who meets Sherlock?! Yes, please!However...When I started reading Jackaby, I was immediately annoyed. This wasn't just a book written in the same flavor of "Doctor Who meets Sherlock", it is quite clearly the Doctor written as Sherlock. In my mind, Jackaby is so clearly Four written as if he were taking a turn at being Sherlock; it even seems like this could be a lost adventure of the Doctor. He even has his own female companion in Abigail Rook (the Watson to Jackaby's Sherlock). The more I read, the more difficulty I had divorcing myself from this idea. After a couple of chapters, I put the book down, not sure that I would finish it.However...Two days later I picked it up again, and immediately found myself annoyed all over again. Yet, I kept reading, and suddenly I found myself at the end of the book and being disappointed that I didn't have more to read! Somewhere along the way, Ritter completely won me over on his characters and story. I still think this could be reworked with very little difficulty into an adventure for the Doctor, but I thoroughly enjoyed it all the same. Eventually I no longer found myself comparing Jackaby to the Sherlock Doctor, and found myself reading him as himself; he developed his own distinct voice and look in my head.As for the story, this is definitely a whodunit with a supernatural twist. Jackaby has the fortunate (unfortunate) ability to see things and creatures that others can not, and as such offers his services to the police to help solve crimes that fall outside the realm of the normal. Newly arrived in the new world, Abigail Rook is in search of a job, and when she answers an advert for an assistant position with Jackaby, he doesn't know what she's set herself up for. Jackaby takes her with him as he goes to investigate a murder, and in contrast to his ability to see the extraordinary, Abigail notices seemingly ordinary and mundane things, yet Jackaby finds these details important. From here, we are offered a fun and rollicking adventure as Jackaby and Abigail try to unravel the mystery of the killer before he kills again.When all is said and done, I want a sequel. I want more Jackaby, more Abigail, more of their banter. If you are a fan of Doctor Who or Sherlock, do yourself a favor and pick up Jackaby. I hope you'll be as pleasantly surprised as I was.
  • (4/5)
    **UPDATE**
    THERE'D BE MORE BOOKS. WELL, AT LEAST ONE MORE NEXT FALL. YES YES YES YES!
    **
    Oh my God. I had very low expectations for this book but...wow
    It was actually good. And I can't believe it's a standalone!!!!! I thought there'd be more books. Ugh.
  • (5/5)
    I loved Jackaby because it reminded me so much of BBC's Sherlock. It felt like I was watching another episode of that show.This book was filled with mystery, adventure, suspense, sarcasm, and humor. Jackaby himself was an indeed curious character. If I had to compare him with someone, I'd say he was a mix between Sherlock and the 11th Doctor from Doctor Who. Can you imagine that?He was incredibly smart, yet completely naive at the same time. He was so sure of himself that he would sometimes come off as snobby and stuck up. However Jackaby was always a step ahead. Which is why it makes his interactions with Abigail, his assistant (think, a Watson to Jackaby's Sherlock or a companion to the Doctor) all the more interesting.Abigail is not extraordinarily smart. She does not know that much of paranormal creatures. For all purposes, she's just like any other human. However she gives Jackaby something he didn't have before: "an insight into the human mind". She certainly holds her own as a character and really stands as a tremendously strong female. She may not be as smart as Jackaby, but she is street smart, she is cunning, and she is brave.The storyline is completely engrossing; the paranormal aspect is very well done and completely believable. The mystery and the whole "whodunnit" aspect was so good! I was turning the pages as fast as I could to find out the mystery.I loved the setting, too. I felt like I could've easily been walking around the streets with Jackaby and Abigail with how amazingly detailed the setting was.Overall, Jackaby was a very entertaining story with awesome characters, a gripping mystery, excellent writing, and an engrossing atmosphere. You definitely do not want to miss out on this one.
  • (2/5)
    There's not really much to say about this one other than I disliked both the narrator and the title character, which obviously means this book didn't hold my attention for very long. So I DNFed at about a quarter of the way through.2/5
  • (4/5)
    Oh my, that was quite delightful :)