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Glory Be

Glory Be

Écrit par Augusta Scattergood

Raconté par Cassandra Morris


Glory Be

Écrit par Augusta Scattergood

Raconté par Cassandra Morris

évaluations:
3.5/5 (15 évaluations)
Longueur:
4 heures
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2015
ISBN:
9780545788809
Format:
Livre audio

Note de l'éditeur

Powerful & poignant...

Childhood ties between family, friendship, and community are at the front of this powerful & poignant novel, set in a segregated Mississippi town in the ’60s.

Description

A Mississippi town in 1964 gets riled when tempers flare at the segregated public pool. As much as Gloriana June Hemphill, or Glory as everyone knows her, wants to turn twelve, there are times when Glory wishes she could turn back the clock a year. Jesslyn, her sister and former confidante, no longer has the time of day for her now that she'll be entering high school. Then there's her best friend, Frankie. Things have always been so easy with Frankie, and now suddenly they aren't. Maybe it's the new girl from the North that's got everyone out of sorts. Or maybe it's the debate about whether or not the town should keep the segregated public pool open. Augusta Scattergood has drawn on real-life events to create a memorable novel about family, friendship, and choices that aren't always easy.
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2015
ISBN:
9780545788809
Format:
Livre audio


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Ce que les gens pensent de Glory Be

3.7
15 évaluations / 10 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (3/5)
    I liked this book overall - it was well-written and had an interesting story. My main beef was that everything seemed too convenient. Glory never seemed that aware of or interested in racial justice, yet writes a fairly passionate letter to the editor. She doesn’t understand what her new friend from up north is doing to help people with “freedom”, yet later seems pretty involved in the movement. There were too many details in some sections, and not enough development in others. I know it’s a kids’ book, but I think there could have been more information about what was going on so the young reader wouldn’t be in the dark, and it would seem more realistic that Glory was learning what was going on as she became more involved in the cause.
  • (4/5)
    Glory lives with her older sister Jesslyn, her father, Brother Joe, a pastor in the local church, and during the days with Emma, the black maid who works for the family. It is the summer of 1964 in the small Mississippi town Hanging Moss, and civil rights are the issue of the day. Glory learns a great deal during a difficult few weeks. Although a few episodes stretch credibility a bit, it is overall an excellent book for reaching young adults about the civil rights era, and how it affected people day to day. We don't see a great deal from the black side. Apart from Emma, there are no black characters. We are seeing things from the staunch conservative racist white, the freedom fighter liberal white, and the children forced to figure out what they believe.
  • (4/5)
    Loved this book! Loved the character of Glory June Hemphill -- a true-to-life girl who just wants her birthday party to be held at the community pool, just like every other year but gets caught up in the Freedom Summer and all that entails. It's a story of civil rights, friendship, boys, and sisters. Look for an interview with the author on my blog, Historically Speaking, soon! So happy to start off the year with such a beautiful mg novel!
  • (4/5)
    It is summertime and Glory is about to turn twelve...what more could a girl ask for? But this isn't a summer like those she remembers. Instead of spending days at the pool, laughing with her older sister, Glory seems to be lost. Her sister has become to grown-up to play, and the pool is closed. The adults say that it is for renovations, but slowly Glory realizes it is because the adults don't want an integrated pool. As Glory's town changes, Glory changes and grows up, too. I think this is a well-told segregation/integration story that will make readers today think about the immense changes that have taken place in the past fifty years, as well as some that still need to happen.
  • (3/5)
    This debut novel offers a nicely told story with an appealing protagonist but I can't help feeling like I've read all this before.
  • (3/5)
    The story had promise... I was happy to hear that it was a book for middle schoolers about freedom summer. In the end, though, I found this book had no real substance. It was about racism, but you never really see any racism other than some people refusing to look at a black woman or acknowledge her existence. You hear a lot about Elvis and some about the Beatles, but never "see" them, not even on tv. It's a book that takes place in 1964 but you don't really get to experience anything real from the time period, the book just gives you the tiniest glimpse. I also could tell this was a book written for children that was written by an old woman. The dialogue wasn't realistic at all. This one just wasn't for me!
  • (3/5)
    Reason for Reading: I enjoy children's historical fiction set during the civil rights movement.A quiet, coming of age story about the summer a white girl, daughter of a preacher, turns twelve amidst the turmoil of the civil rights movement coming to her small rural Mississippi town. While the main plot issue deals with the problems caused by certain town folks who are adamantly against the new segregation laws being put into practice in their town, the real focus of the story is Glory and her relationship with various people and her becoming aware of these issues around her. It is a story of sisters, as she and her sister, who is in high school now, drift apart and yet start a new kind of relationship. It is also a story of friends as Glory becomes distant from her best friend from childhood and draws close to a newcomer from the North.The issues are handled very well and seen through the eyes of a child just developing into an awareness of life around her. Glory is an easy character to identify with, though some of the other characters weren't fully developed. This is a quiet story with small events happening and leading up to the climax but without any real action except one scene where a boy is beat up. Probably most suited to girls, an enjoyable quick read full of typical southern storytelling.
  • (4/5)
    Love It
  • (5/5)

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    Glory Be Have you ever been blame on for something you never did? Well in this book Glory Be, it about a girl named Gloriana June Hemphill but they called her Glory. She meets this girl named Laura that moved into her town. In this book it’s a different race from them back then. They lived in a time when racism kept them from not being friends. Glory is, is a good friend, nice to everybody in her town, and she lived with her sister and father. I like this book because, it talks about two friends and they just meet each other and nothing couldn’t get in there way at all. The author of this book is Augusta Russell Scattergood. She is a former school librarian, wrote Glory Be and The Way to Stay in Destiny. Her debut novel, was named one of Amazon’s Top Twenty Middle School books 2012. The Hanging Moss Community Pool is closing right before Glory’s birthday on July 4th and she wants the pool to open. I would recommend this book to anybody that want’s to read it. Will segregation end in this book? Then read it.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • (3/5)

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    Derivative. Good subject matter--town pool closed to avoid integration--but inconsistent characterization and marked oversimplification. Main character especially naive at times and astute at others.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile