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Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

Écrit par Becky Albertalli

Raconté par Michael Crouch


Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

Écrit par Becky Albertalli

Raconté par Michael Crouch

évaluations:
4.5/5 (755 évaluations)
Longueur:
6 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Apr 7, 2015
ISBN:
9780062411501
Format:
Livre audio

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Note de l'éditeur

Cute teenage romance…

You’ll love this book if you’re a champion of more LGBTQ representation in YA and if you generally enjoy quippy teenage wit. Simon’s coming out story is a great blend of lovable teenage hijinks, mystery, and cute romance.

Description

Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight.

Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: If he doesn't play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone's business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he's been emailing with, will be compromised.

With some messy dynamics emerging in his once tight-knit group of friends and his email correspondence with Blue growing more flirtatious every day, Simon's junior year has suddenly gotten all kinds of complicated. Now change-averse Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he's pushed out — without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy he's never met.

A HarperAudio production.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Apr 7, 2015
ISBN:
9780062411501
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre


À propos de l'auteur

Becky Albertalli is the number one New York Times bestselling author of William C. Morris Award winner and National Book Award longlist title Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda (now a major motion picture, Love, Simon); The Upside of Unrequited; Leah on the Offbeat; the Simonverse novella Love, Creekwood; What If It’s Us (cowritten with Adam Silvera); Yes No Maybe So (cowritten with Aisha Saeed); and most recently, Kate in Waiting. Becky lives with her family in Atlanta. You can visit her online at www.beckyalbertalli.com.

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Ce que les gens pensent de Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

4.5
755 évaluations / 95 Avis
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Avis critiques

  • Simon Spier is forced to come out to friends and family after his secret correspondence with another boy is discovered. Funny and moving, witty and wise, this is a must-have on any YA book list.

    Scribd Editors

Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    For more reviews, gifs, Cover Snark and more, visit A Reader of Fictions.Everyone, aka Lindsay Ribar and Dahlia Adler, told me that Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda was a Christina book. While I totally love this, it also makes me nervous. What if I let them down? And Becky’s a local author, so disliking her book could be totally awkward and angst angst angst. I worried for absolutely no reason, because freaking obviously Dahlia and Lindsay were all sorts of right, and Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda is just the cutest freaking book.First off, I love Simon. His voice is absolute perfection. I didn’t quite instalove on his narration, but I actually love that too. Simon takes time to open up to people. He’s not the easiest guy in the world to get to know, because he really doesn’t like having people all up in his business. While popular and friends with most everybody, Simon’s a bit reserved and judgmental. He’s a sweet guy, but he’s also stubborn and swears a lot, which also makes me love him even more.The reason Simon’s so secretive, even with his best friends, is his family. He loves them, but they’re also overwhelmingly interested. I empathize, Simon. He holds information back because people make such a big deal about it and it really makes him nervous. The family dynamics are truly perfect, though. The whole family is so loving, which doesn’t mean perfect obviously. The parents are very present and do things like grounding their kids. Also, the family traditions like Facebook status hunting and Bachelorette viewing are so adorable.Then there are the friend group dynamics. Simon’s closest friends have always been Leah and Nick, but, lately, Abby, a transfer, has become part of the group. It’s thrown off the dynamics in a big way, especially since Leah likes Nick, who likes Abby. Simon, in his typical way, is trying to avoid the drama getting to him, which in turn causes problems. Establishing groups of friends and actually giving all of them screen time is really tricky—there’s a reason most YA characters have a singular friend—but Albertalli really pulls it off. The tension between Abby and Leah is especially well-handled; it could easily have felt like girl hate, but it’s way more than that.Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda is framed around Simon’s email romance with a mystery guy he calls Blue. For about five seconds, I thought that was the guy’s real name and was doing some serious side-eye, but it’s all good. The rapport between Simon and Blue via email is super adorable. Though Blue doesn’t want to reveal his real identity, they also open up about a lot of stuff they don’t feel comfortable telling anyone irl. It’s so much easier to talk to people online, and that really makes their flirtation work.The two talk a lot about coming out. Simon‘s sort of about that, but I’d say it’s more about finding yourself in general. Simon and Blue do come out over the course of the book, but it’s not a huge deal. I also like that Simon talks about how revealing anything new about himself feels like coming out, and that really everyone should come out, because there’s no reason to assume someone’s straight either. Albertalli also touches on the way that casual jokes that aren’t meant to harm can really be upsetting in Simon’s relationship with his dad. Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda is most definitely a fluffy romance, but it is also designed top open eyes and make people consider how heteronormativity continues to be an underpinning of society.Simon, in trying to figure out who Blue is, checks out a lot of guys. I love this. He has someone he’s mentally chosen to cast as Blue in his fantasies, but he’s basically got minor crushes on several people. This is so true to my own teen experience and in YA characters are so often only into THE ONE. The dynamics in this book are just spot on. Also, I called the ship immediately and I was right and it was beautiful.Finally, remember how I mentioned Albertalli’s a local author? I actually even picked this book up free at Decatur Book Festival last August. Anyway, it’s set in Atlanta, which is a special pleasure for me. I particularly delighted in the comment that this one kid has a southern accent and how weird that is. People from most anywhere else are always asking why I don’t have an accent. The novel also reflects the diversity I’m used to seeing in my daily life. Similarly, I think the reaction to Simon being gay fit pretty well with Atlanta and what things were like in my high school.Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda is so good that I spent the last half of the book literally yelling AWWWW at it out loud. This is not necessarily normal behavior for me. *shoves Simon at everyone*
  • (4/5)
    Yes, I admit, I was driven to read this after seeing and loving the movie. In a lot of ways, I actually felt the movie was better in this instance. Why? Because it actually got it right and is, overall, extremely faithful to the book. Thus, since I saw it first, the book really just felt like a repeat which took longer to get through. Still, whether you read the book or watch the movie, this is a story that you really need to get into.
  • (4/5)
    Loved this book!! Now I want to go see the movie. Simon is such an interestingly written character, and the way he deals with his blackmailer is fun to read. I especially loved his relationships with his friends, and the ending. Oh my!!
  • (5/5)
    What a wonderful read! Many lines were spot on in the novel--why doesn't everyone have to come out?! I finished the book and realized I truly enjoyed the characters, plot, and the entire novel. While the main character is gay, they novel itself was more a "humankind" experience. The universal themes of acceptance, love, bullying, and friendship are strong and transcend the other elements of the novel. A must read!
  • (5/5)
    A must read YA novel... grab a copy!
  • (4/5)
    This book is so funny and totally adorable. I seriously smiled through half of it. Such a sweet story and a very quick read!
  • (5/5)
    High school student Simon isn't quite ready to tell his friends and family that he's gay but when another student accidentally stumbles upon the secret and threatens to reveal it, Simon is left in a bad place. Meanwhile, Simon has also been anonymously emailing with another gay student, whom he is developing a real crush on ... except neither of them know each other's true identity.This was a great read with characters that felt realistic. The characters represent a fairly diverse set of people, without feeling like it's trying to fit a quota. The romance aspect was really nicely done and I caught myself smiling at how cute it was several times -- and I'm not typically a romance fan!While there were definitely moments that suggested otherwise, on the whole it ended happily for everyone involved. (Some people might not like that sort of 'Hollywood' ending, but sometimes it's nice to have a book that isn't all doom and gloom.) I would definitely recommend this title to teens and adults who enjoy realistic fiction.For the audiobook listener, Michael Crouch was an absolutely fabulous narrator. He made all the characters, but most especially Simon, come to life.
  • (4/5)
    Simon vs. The HomoSapiens Agendaby Becky Albertelli2015Epic Reads4.8 / 5.0One of the most genuine and beautiful depictions of coming out and gay teenage crushes I have read. It's funny and sweet,but also a serious and mostly positive example of coming out in a largely straight world. It has passion and pride, fear and insecurity. Becky Albertelli brings the very personal act of coming out/ being outed to the reader in a supportive and inclusive fashion. To educate not to label.Simon is the sweet funny guy at Shady Creek High School, who uses a school computer to send an email to a mysterious guy he likes, all he knows is he goes by the name blue. Blue also attends the same school, but they share no personal information so have no idea who the other one is. But Simon forgets to log out of the computer and the email is seen by a straight guy, Martin, who tells Simon he will keep the email and the screenshot private if Simon will help him meet a girl he likes, Abby.It's hard not to like such an uplifting and positive book, that shares the emotional and encompassing feeling all teenagers experience, with an overall tone of acceptance.
  • (5/5)
    5 freaking stars
    (because that was the highlight of my day, possibly even week and month)

    I wasn't sure what to think of the book before I started it, thinking I might not be that interested in reading about a 16-year-old, but it turned out to be one of my favourites books so far and I'm so happy that I read it. It totally made my day in such an unexpected but so pleasant way. I'm going to sleep with a smile on my face tonight thanks to that book and, seeing how the rest of my day was so bad, that's saying a lot.

    I loved it right from the start, from the very first page actually. Simon was such an amazing protagonist it was really easy and enjoyable to read it from his perspective. Actually, all characters were awesome in their own way and I'm pretty sure it's because they are so realistic. I have a vivid image of all of them and their relationships with each other, and it was just so good to read a LGBT novel from such a funny and positive yet realistic view.

    I may not have laughed out loud that often, but I definitely smiled almost the entire book and you can be sure there are many quotes from that book that I'm gonna write down, because that's how both funny and just-so-true-and-relatable this book is to me.

    I highly recommend it, especially since it's quite short and an easy read, but one that you'll definitely remember fondly!
  • (5/5)
    Well the movie led me to this novel. I loved the movie but adored this even more as I really enjoyed the more in depth look at Blue through his emails with Simon; lovely to see their relationship grow a bit as well rather than just ending on a kiss.
  • (5/5)
    It's very rare, unheard of in fact, for me to read a book in one sitting but (and I'm aware it's cliched, sorry) I actually didn't want to put this book down. Simon is such an interesting and engaging person, I loved being inside his head and feeling everything he did.

    The story starts with the first anguish that someone has discovered his secret about his sexuality and the emails he sends to an anonymous student at their school, and takes us on a quick journey through his developing feelings for 'Blue' and his relationships with his friends.

    I'd been told that this was 'just a coming out story' and the person who told me that sold it short by a long shot. This story is so much more, and Simon's almost forced coming out is a sideline to the deeper look into friendships, how we know ourselves (can we ever), how well we know the people around us, the surprises and secrets that everyone hides.

    I loved how deeply we got into Simon's head, into his private life, and how he displayed his mortification when he realises the assumptions and prejudices he's been exhibiting.

    This is such a brilliantly written and emotional story. I smiled so much, I laughed, I almost cried, and now I'm done I want to read it all over again.
  • (3/5)
    Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda presents an interesting look at a boys coming out story. Though sometimes written as that the reader feels as if they come in at the middle of the story, the character of Simon is perfectly written to make that not seem as important as the challenges in which he mets ranging from blackmail, coming out, and meeting his email friend. Overall, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda is a good story with a main character in which easily to relate to no matter whom you are.
  • (4/5)
    i normally do not go for young adult contemporary but this book is SO CUTE i kept having to put my book down it was just TOO CUTE
  • (5/5)
    Nice romantic coming of age story. This Brazilian Portuguese version is a nice easy read for us romantics.
  • (4/5)
    This book made me say 'awww' and sigh - every few pages. Such sweet moments. And I'm not usually the 'awww' type of person. Perhaps I need to let myself change into that sort of person more often.
  • (5/5)
    This was one of those books that I'm skeptical about and unsure if I'm going to finish it, let alone LIKE it. But, I loved it! I've heard about this book so much on BookTube and in social media, even before the movie and I can't believe it took me this long to read. I really didn't know what I was missing not reading this book. I will recommend this book to everyone.
  • (4/5)
    Simon a gay high school student who has never come out... not so much out of fear of rejection, as fear of everyone making a big deal of it. But when he starts having a flirtatious email-only affair with another closeted boy in his own school, things start to change. Meanwhile, he is trying to maintain his close friendships with a few fellow students, stay close to his family - who are quite supportive - and get through a a blackmail attempt from a guy who has seen some of his emails to "Blue" and threatened to expose him if Simon won't help him hook up with his own crush.Simon and his friends are an extremely likable bunch, and the book has far more upbeat pages than downers. Even the blackmailing Martin is never as bad as I expected him to be. I found it a sweet, enjoyable book. Good - but not quite as good as the hype and awards led me to expect.One little criticism: The words cute and adorable were used WAY too frequently.
  • (4/5)
    In Simon vs. the Homo Sapien Agenda, Simon, a gay teenager, enters into an anonymous email relationship with another gay, male student named Blue when he discovers his post on the school Tumblr site. But Simon is careless, and he leaves the content of one of his emails on the screen when he signs out of the computer at the school library. Another student, Martin, threatens to expose Simon as being gay. He uses that information to blackmail Simon into promoting a relationship for him with Abby, one of Simon’s best friends. Throughout the novel, the reader becomes familiar with, not only Simon, but also his circle of friends and the individual dynamics that are occurring within that group. Simon is such a likable fellow, full of feeling and humor, so one cannot help but wish him the best, as he strives to find his path through this social quagmire. I so appreciated this novel because I felt that it presented a very relevant coming of age story, one which is true to the high school scene, and one to which many teenagers might relate.
  • (4/5)
    Pretty good book, I plan to watch the movie soon.
  • (4/5)
    This is a delightful book that captures the angst of growing up and coming to terms with one's identity. While focused on the coming out of a teenage boy, the author extends the message to all teens: everyone has a uniqueness that will transition them from child to adult, a break in the image their environment had of them. Some kids have it easier than others, but it's a rite of passage.Definitely a recommended read of any teenager.
  • (4/5)
    Simon is outed while trying to deal with his best friends' problems, his parents, and his youngest sister. I liked Simon. His family was weird but likable. The story captured the angst of the teen years. Best friends are not easy to tell especially when jealousy comes along. He is also falling in love with a Tumblr e-mail pal. I liked how social media is portrayed--the good and the bad to the downright ugly. This is a good beach read. I look forward to more in the series.
  • (4/5)
    This was such a fun, feel good story. I loved the back and forth emails between Jacques and Blue. I switched multiple times on guessing who Blue was. This book made my heart happy. I read both on my kindle and listened to the audible version.💙💙💙💙
  • (4/5)
    Simon vs The Homo Sapiens Agenda is a really fun novel to read, but it's not the easiest novel for me to review as a straight reader. I've read the arguments that this novel is more written for straight readers than LGBT ones and perhaps that's true. Really, I have no way of judging it. Perhaps this novel will speak to you on a personal level and perhaps not. However, I can say that I really enjoyed it.While the book doesn't have much by way of a plot, it presents a really moving character study of a gay teenager as he is forced to come out. It's really a look at why coming out is such a "big deal", contrasting the views of Simon's straight friends (many of whom don't fully understand him) with the complexity of Simon's feelings. While the story seems simple on the surface, it explores some very complicated themes as Simon struggles to define himself and discovers what he means to those around him.The chapters are interspersed with emails between Simon and Blue. These were some of my favourite parts of the story as they felt very natural. Their relationship clearly blossomed over the course of the story and both boys, while witty and heartfelt, also had noticeably different voices. However, I didn't really think that the novel dropped enough hints as to Blue's true identity. While there were some clues later in the novel, when this is finally revealed the story tries to make it seem as though this should have been obvious despite some of the information that was available to Simon was withheld from the reader.Yet the novel is still very sweet and I did get very invested in their relationship, ever hopeful that the two would eventually find happiness together. However, I did think that some of the secondary cast felt a bit shallow. While the cast of the story is quite large, Simon's viewpoint is understandably self-centred. All we really learn about the cast is how they react to Simon. Ultimately, we don't learn much about most of them purely because Simon doesn't know them on a personal level.So, in all, this novel is definitely one that I would recommend. I loved Simon as a character and found that I was incredibly invested in his relationship with Blue. While it's not my favourite LGBT novel, it's definitely one that I'd recommend.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book, I really liked Simon as a character and I enjoyed the humour in the novel. Most of the characters were pretty believable, especially with all their high school drama (although I could tell I was no longer in high school because the drama annoyed me) These teens reactions to their situation was pretty realistic, even if a little horrifying at times. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it to others :)
  • (5/5)
    Well the movie led me to this novel. I loved the movie but adored this even more as I really enjoyed the more in depth look at Blue through his emails with Simon; lovely to see their relationship grow a bit as well rather than just ending on a kiss.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. It was as if the author took a page from my life in high school and added more girl drama. I found myself visualizing my friends with in the pages of this gay coming of age book.
  • (5/5)
    Loved this book! Speedy and fun read with a great ending. You will feel for Simon and what he goes through.
  • (5/5)
    Simon Spier has not told anyone that he's gay. He knows everyone will still love him, but it's just not fair that he has to "come out" and straight people don't. The only person who knows is Simon's secret pen pal - a boy in Simon's grade who he emails with every day and knows only as "Blue". They confide in each other despite - or because of - not knowing who the other one is. But their relationship is in danger when someone finds out and threatens Simon with exposure. Will Simon give into blackmail, or let someone else take away his freedom to come out on his own terms? Simon is great. Simon's family is great. His friends are great. The reveal of Blue's identity was perfect. As with the best YA books, there's a theme of not knowing who the people around you really are. Simon has a part of his life that he keeps from everyone else, but at the same time he doesn't know his classmates well enough to tell which one is Blue. As usual I had a few logistical problems (which probably mostly stem from the fact that I don't understand Tumblr) but the good writing and delightful story more than compensated.
  • (5/5)
    Unexpectedly Fun (Possible Spoilers)

    I'm not sure what I expected when I decided I needed to read this, but this wasn't it. At the first few paragraphs I was disappointed. It seemed almost juvenile in how it was written. But the more I read, the more my mind changed.

    This was a fun read; I couldn't put it down. I started it late thinking I would read a few chapters and then go to bed. But it didn't work that way for me. Here I am in the wee hours of the morning reviewing it because I couldn't stop reading until I finished.

    I felt for Simon and wanted to murder Martin. But I also wanted to punch Simon. At the very least he should have told his best friend that someone was blackmailing him to get to her, but there wouldn't have been much of a story then. The blackmail debacle is what gave us time to get to know Simon and Blue as well as Simon's friends, who were important.

    I hurt so bad when Martin outed Simon. I wanted to deep fry him, but I think we all knew it was coming. Martin was selfish and childish and could have been a good friend of not for his immaturity. All he cared about was what he wanted and I'm glad that Simon didn't forgive him in the end. Maybe he does somewhere down the line, like well into adulthood, but even that would be too good for him. What Martin did doesn't deserve forgiveness.

    And as for Blue, I had a feeling all along that it wasn't Cal. For a half second I wondered about Nick, but when they described him having anime heart-eyes for Abby I knew it wasn't an act. In the end I suspected and even hoped for Bram because of the way Simon noticed him. He REALLY noticed him even if it was only in passing and that spoke volumes to me. I'm so glad it was him, and I'm so glad they worked out.

    If nothing else this book had laughs and teaches the dangers of logging into private accounts on public computers. It should also teach people to think before you act, because there are some things you can't take back that could ruin other's lives. And the guilt is something you live with forever.
  • (5/5)
    SO many feels!