Découvrez votre prochain livre audio préféré

Devenez membre dès aujourd'hui et écoutez gratuitement pendant 30 jours
More Happy Than Not

More Happy Than Not

Écrit par Adam Silvera

Raconté par Ramon De Ocampo


More Happy Than Not

Écrit par Adam Silvera

Raconté par Ramon De Ocampo

évaluations:
4/5 (130 évaluations)
Longueur:
8 heures
Sortie:
Jun 2, 2015
ISBN:
9781490683935
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre

Note de l'éditeur

Unforgettable characters…

Adam Silvera’s debut is unforgettable, with its compelling characters, its deft depiction of class politics without relying on stereotypes and slang, and its message that hardship helps us find happiness.

Description

Happiness shouldn't be this hard…

When it first gets announced, the Leteo Institute's memory-alteration procedure seems too good to be true to Aaron Soto—miracle cure-alls don't tend to pop up in the Bronx projects. Aaron can't forget how he’s grown up poor, how his friends all seem to shrug him off, and how his father committed suicide in their one bedroom apartment. He has the support of his patient girlfriend, if not necessarily his distant brother and overworked mother, but it’s not enough.

Then Thomas shows up. He doesn't mind Aaron's obsession over the Scorpius Hawthorne books and has a sweet movie set-up on his roof. There are nicknames. Aaron’s not only able to be himself, but happiness feels easy with Thomas. The love Aaron discovers may cost him what's left of his life, but since Aaron can't suddenly stop being gay Leteo may be the only way out…

Sortie:
Jun 2, 2015
ISBN:
9781490683935
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre

À propos de l'auteur

Adam Silvera is the number one New York Times bestselling author of More Happy Than Not, History Is All You Left Me, They Both Die at the End, Infinity Son, Infinity Reaper, and—with Becky Albertalli—What If It’s Us. He was named a Publishers Weekly Flying Start for his debut. Adam was born and raised in the Bronx. He was a bookseller before shifting to children’s publishing and has worked at a literary development company and a creative writing website for teens and as a book reviewer of children’s and young adult novels. He is tall for no reason and lives in Los Angeles. Visit him online at www.adamsilvera.com.


Lié à More Happy Than Not

Livres audio associé

Avis

Ce que les gens pensent de More Happy Than Not

4.2
130 évaluations / 25 Avis
Qu'avez-vous pensé ?
Évaluation : 0 sur 5 étoiles

Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    4.5 stars.

    This debut novel surprised me. I started off not being too sure about it and then loved it! Sometimes I'm like that I need a little convincing and then kapow - it hits me full force. Great idea, fantastic characters, particularly the main protagonist Aaron Soto, thought provoking questions about his emerging sexuality, and interesting setting - the Bronx. Have added to my favourites list.
  • (5/5)
    In this slightly-altnerative world, the drug Leteo promises to erase bad memories. Aaron is trying to be happy but is dogged with sad feelings and bad memories. His father has just committed suicide, one of his friends has been gunned down, and he has other secrets he's trying to repress. Surrounded by a posse of childhood friends, a steadfast girlfriend, and a wide city (Brooklyn? the Bronx?) to explore, Aaron does manage to have some fun. In his wanderings, he meets Thomas whose philosophical questions and intense listening make for a new kind of friend. But trouble appears when Aaron tries to change their relationship. All of this makes Aaron a perfect candidate for the Leteo procedure... but is he? Great, authentic voice with lots of natural humor, this book alternates in tone and was, at times, hard to swallow. Also, imho, way too long. Still, this will speak to LGBTQ youth and anyone who is tortured with "bad" thoughts.
  • (5/5)
    This book made me cry in a shopping center food court.

    If that doesn't scare you off, then get it.

    Adam Silvera is one of my favorite authors at the moment. He doesn't sugar coat the world. He writes about real life, real loss, and real people. I find his books captivating from the start. I fall in love with his characters and ... if... they don't make it to the end, I grieve.
  • (5/5)
    the twist blew me away, i wasn't expecting it.
    i couldn't srop crying at the ending either.
    when you're comfronted with the possibility of erasing or changing your painful past in memories, would you take it?
    tbh, yes i would.
    and maybe I'd be as bad off in a totally different way.
    i actually didn't know this book dealt with depression or suicide, otherwise I wouldn't have read it without preparation, but they were broached and tackle with reality, so definitely pleased.
    a sequel wouldn't work, but I'm still pretty devastated. and i will remember him, happy or not.
    now I'll just go continue to cry on my corner /sobs
  • (4/5)
    Why do I continue to let Adam Silvera break my heart? I should know by now, I should have learnt, but I was not prepared for where this book took me.
  • (4/5)
    I gave up about 80 pages in because it seemed pretty boring, but I picked it back up and it turned a corner.
  • (4/5)
    4.5/5 stars. I found this book to be pretty great! i loved the character development and really enjoyed the story. Aaron was a really relatable character and I enjoyed getting to know him and about his life. It was a great read to pick up after reading a creepy book :)
  • (3/5)
    This may be a book to reread within weeks of the initial experience. It's unsettling, at times slow and awkward, and confusing. That may very well be due to the expression of Aaron Soto's experience throughout the story. To say he's going through a rough patch is an understatement.

    Minority representation - and dual instances of race and sexual orientation - is slowly becoming more common in YA but still might be considered a niche topic for a specific audience. My question would be whether this could be considered an erasure of bisexuality in favor of simply being understood as gay; there are even fewer books that consider bisexual characters, much less protagonists.

    Aaron's Puerto Rican heritage was a really interesting read and gave context to the cultural perspectives of his family and friends. It shaped the world and his environment. You could see how easy it was to be friends when growing up together like that. This makes the violent betrayal that much more devastating.

    The desire to forget everything is understandable, and that desire is manifested in the Leteo Institute's technology. This plot point fell short due to how easily it came about. The analogy of quick fixes backfiring is a bit repetitive and a bit of a let down. I think the story may have been more powerful if there was an actual opportunity for Aaron to recover and work through the difficulties. It's important to show the realities of hate crimes in addition to the feel-good stories, but the ending fell flat and was a bit disappointing.

    More Happy Than Not can be an important book, and provides a great opportunity for discussion for more than just the YA crowd.
  • (5/5)
    Thank you Netgalley for suggesting this book for my reading list, because I'm doubtful I would have found it on my own!
    It is suggested in the synopsis that it's a bit like Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, and there is a sliver of that story in this one, but that is only a small part of this beautifully written book about a young man's discovery of who he is and why it's impossible to forget.

    Learning that this is the author's debut was hard to fathom, since the quality and content are full of depth and brilliance. I look forward to reading much more from this amazing talent.
  • (5/5)
    This is a "Flowers for Algernon" for today's generation of youth.

    Aaron Soto is a kid from the Bronx projects. He's got a group of friends that he's hung out with all his life, and a girlfriend that he's wildly in love with. These two things have been helping him keep it together since his father's suicide.
    The pain of that loss makes him think twice when he hears the new ads that are popping up all over the place for the Leteo Procedure - a new medical treatment that promises to erase traumatic memories. Someone he knew even had the procedure - a neighbor whose twin brother was murdered. Of course, he hasn't seen the guy since it happened.
    But, with the support of of his girlfriend, Aaron is managing.
    Then one day, he meets Thomas. He finds a kindred soul in this new friend, who quickly becomes the one he's spending most of his free time with. The friendship leads him to start re-evaluating some of his life attitudes... and starts driving a wedge into his more long-term relationships. And then, things really start unraveling.

    Five stars, not because this is going to be one of my personal favorites of all time (although I did very much enjoy it), but because I don't think that what this particular novel set out to do could have been done any better. A masterful, emotional work that will touch hearts and change lives.

    Many thanks to NetGalley and Soho Press for the opportunity to read. As always, my opinions are solely my own.
  • (5/5)
    Review to come after I fee like I can catch my breath again.
  • (2/5)
    Memory modification is available to people but not everyone trusts it. Sadly, while a promising premise, not a great story.
  • (4/5)
    Medical memory blackout goes haywire in this bittersweet tale of unrequited love.
  • (3/5)
    *SPOILER* So emotionally intense I can't bring myself to read it again to clear up the confusion I encountered after Aaron's memories unwind. Had he already had the Leteo procedure to forget Collin and being gay by the time he met Thomas? In any case, it's a deep exploration of forming one's identity and presents a debate on the value of life's joys and pains.
  • (5/5)
    This is a YA mashup of Flowers for Algernon and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, with a ripped-from-the-headlines twist: Aaron Soto has decided to have his bad memories erased, by Leteo, a biotech company.Guess what doesn't work. Aaron's father committed suicide and he doesn't know why. Or does he? Aaron loves Genevieve. Aaron loves Collin. Aaron loves Thomas. Or does he?The plot points may be a bit unlikely, but the dialogue, Bronx neighborhood setting, childhood recollections, and characters are all memorable and beautifully drawn and structured. It would be on a required summer reading list if those things were remotely cool. I hope there are more great reads to come from Adam Silvera.
  • (4/5)
    This book is thoughtful and prompts us to consider some very interesting issues. Be sure to pay attention to the sparse visuals as you progress through the book.
  • (5/5)
    My full length review of this is on my GoodReads account @ Gangsey. This starts off catchy, turns Rocky in the middle considering Aaron is a little unreliable and turns keep happening, but you fall for this mess of a character anyway, because you TRULY want him to do and feel better. Despite it all you want him to be happy, even if he's pushing others away, thinking of himself, etc. But he learns. He grows. He evolves. This book is a crazy testament to his development. You think you're losing grip on the book but then it hits you! You're holding on tight praying, crying. You just want it all to end because it hurts so bad. But then it holds you. This story cradles you and urges you to let go. And you do. It leaves you happy. Happier than not.

    Give this book a try, push through hard topics, hard turns where you want to walk away. This story is worth every gripe, every angry change every shake of your first when you say "that's it, I'm done". Don't give up. This book will not leave you disappointed. Read it. And love it, and don't forget to love yourself.

    I spent an hour afterwards, crying, and planning on having fifteen of the damn quotes inked on my skin because it left me feeling like I had jumped off a very high building. Thrilled, scared with my adrenaline pumping. In Love.

    Read. It.
  • (3/5)
    Honestly it really could have been better. What the hell man?! This is a terrible representation of queer people in my opinion, but I guess Rivera might be trying to represent something that he thinks is critical. Overall, I enjoyed it, but it really could have been better.

  • (5/5)
    Utterly amazing book. I've never been such a wreck. I never saw it coming until it hit me. Fantastic work from Adam Silvera
  • (3/5)
    It felt like a rough draft of something that might be better. I have listened to a few of his titles but this one disappointed me a bit.
  • (5/5)

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    Still one of my favorite books and I enjoyed it so much on audio! I highly recommend it!

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • (5/5)

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    I thought I knew what to expect. I was wrong. I should have expected it, considering the novel is clearly heavily influenced by Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, but this novel still took me for a spin, and in the end, it hurt my heart so badly that I don't even know what to think.

    I finished about an hour ago, and I still feel like crying. I'm so sad. But the thing about this sadness, is that it's a needed sadness. It isn't a book that is sad to be sad, or that gives you a sugar-sweet happy ending just to satisfy that desire in all of us for happiness. It's a book about finding happiness within yourself, and how sometimes, we have to hurt to find out what happiness is.

    And boy oh boy, do I hurt.

    I wouldn't change a thing about this book, no matter how badly I wish things turned out differently for the characters in the book. It's a perfect ending, and it shows the difficulties of the pursuit of happiness, and the effects our choices have. I cannot recommend this book enough.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • (4/5)
    In the film Shadowlands, to help him deal with his grief, the dying wife of C.S Lewis tells him, “The pain then is part of the happiness now. That’s the deal.” It’s always been one of my favorite quotes. So moving. And if you've lost someone dear, you know it's so true.I chose this book because of its unique premise. It combines a gay coming of age story with an intriguing speculative fiction element. For the first two-thirds of the book, frankly, I thought I was going to be disappointed because author Adam Silvera spends way too much time on the set-up - covering similar ground as in countless other coming out stories. Sixteen year-old Aaron Soto hangs out with his group of rough neck friends in their Bronx neighborhood, worries about his over-worked but doting mother, feuds with his video-game obsessed older brother, loses his virginity to Genevieve, the girl he think he loves until he meets Thomas, the new hottie in town, who awakens his latent desires. Yadda yadda yadda – all the usual suspects. And yet…throughout there's foreshadowing of darker undercurrents – particularly with regard to Aaron’s father’s suicide and his own subsequent attempt. For the most part, these two topics go unexplored, ostensibly due to Aaron’s reticence to dwell on negative things in his past. But is that the whole story? Is it the true story?All I can say is once you get past the redundancy of the early chapters and the tale begins to unfold in earnest, it’s enthralling and gut-wrenching. And while the protagonist is gay, and certainly his coming to terms with that is integral to the story, Silvera is really addressing much bigger, more universal themes about coping with grief and pain. Aaron learns, perhaps too late, that the risk we take when we love someone is that we’ll eventually lose them, one way or another. Because the pain then is part of the happiness now. That’s the deal.This one really sneaks up on you. A sophisticated addition to the LGBT YA canon and an all-round powerful debut.
  • (4/5)

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    This is the story of Aaron, a teenager who wishes to undergo a memory-relief procedure in an attempt to forget that he is gay. Growing up in the projects in Bronx, he knows what it is like to be poor, how his father killed himself, how tough life is and what it means to be accepted by your peers. That is why Aaron has a girlfriend who adores him but it is also why he wants to fight his feelings for his new friend Thomas. What Aaron has forgotten is that he went through this procedure before trying to forget his sexual preference, so this second time is much riskier. This is an interesting look at what it means to be gay and how you can never change who you truly are.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • (3/5)

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    Aaron Soto has always known about the Leteo Institute. But until he realizes something, he would rather not know, he had no interest in the procedure for himself. Now, with his history, his friends' ostracizing him and rejection by his best friend and girlfriend, he is changing his mind.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile