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Stella by Starlight

Stella by Starlight

Écrit par Sharon M. Draper

Raconté par Heather Alicia Simms


Stella by Starlight

Écrit par Sharon M. Draper

Raconté par Heather Alicia Simms

évaluations:
4/5 (44 évaluations)
Longueur:
6 heures
Sortie:
Jan 6, 2015
ISBN:
9781442380400
Format:
Livre audio

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Description

When the Ku Klux Klan makes an unwelcome reappearance in Stella's segregated southern town, bravery battles prejudice in this Depression-era tour de force from Sharon Draper, the New York Times bestselling author of Out of My Mind.

Stella lives in the segregated South-in Bumblebee, North Carolina, to be exact about it. Some stores she can go into. Some stores she can't. Some folks are right pleasant. Others are a lot less so. To Stella, it sort of evens out, and heck, the Klan hasn't bothered them for years. But one late night, later than she should ever be up, much less wandering around outside, Stella and her little brother see something they're never supposed to see, something that is the first flicker of change to come, unwelcome change by any stretch of the imagination. As Stella's community-her world-is upended, she decides to fight fire with fire. And she learns that ashes don't necessarily signify an end.
Sortie:
Jan 6, 2015
ISBN:
9781442380400
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre


À propos de l'auteur

Sharon M. Draper is a three-time New York Times bestselling author and a recipient of the Margaret A. Edwards Award honoring her significant and lasting contribution to writing for teens. She has received the Coretta Scott King Award for both Copper Sun and Forged by Fire, and was awarded the Charlotte Huck Award for Stella by Starlight. Her novel Out of My Mind has won multiple awards and was a New York Times bestseller for over three years, and Blended has also been a New York Times bestseller. She lives in Florida, where she taught high school English for twenty-five years and was named National Teacher of the Year. Visit her at SharonDraper.com.


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4.2
44 évaluations / 15 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (3/5)
    Newbery 2016 no
    Stella and her brother are sneaking around in the woods near their house in Bumblee, North Carolina one night, and see the Klu Klux Klan burning a cross. They know how serious this is, and run right home to tell their parents, who are scared and angry at the children for putting themselves in danger. The community is aware that African Americans in the south in the 1930s are supposed to keep to their "place", but they also know that things are changing. Stella questions why the school for white children is so much better; she struggles with her writing, but works very hard in school, and starts her own newspaper when she is given a typewriter, although she never shares her writings. Stella's father and several other local men decide to register to vote-- they jump through all of the unnecessary hoops that the white men set for them, and manage to go vote, even though the reaction of the Klu Klux Klan is to burn down the house of one of the men, displacing his large family. The community, including some white families, rally to help.
    I thought the book got off to aslow start, then escalated, and fell once again at the end?
  • (5/5)
    Draper is a wonderful author, and this book does not disappoint. Engaging historical fiction inspired by her grandmother’s diaries, beautifully written without being too sentimental.
  • (5/5)
    Stella is character all kids can relate to. She has trouble in school, she dislikes doing chores, and she is trying to find her identity. She also witnessed activities by the KKK while out walking at night. Stella's family and the other African-American families in town are alarmed that the Klan is resuming activities and struggle to keep their children safe. While not as gut-wrenching as Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor, this book also illuminates many of the problems of the Jim Crow South. What stands out is the humanity of the characters as Draper avoids easy stereotypes. Stories as a cultural touchstone is a primary theme and adds both humor and emotional depth.In particular, the teacher's retelling of a "Flying African" folktale is exquisitely touching. The power of words is also shown as Stella struggles to put her thoughts on paper with a typewriter given to her by a neighbor. This needs to be shared with families and classrooms and provides many jumping off points for discussions on racism, voting rights, and community values. It might be interesting to pair the "Flying African" passage with the picture book Tar Beach by Faith Ringgold.
  • (3/5)
    Narrated by Heather Alicia Simms. Simms' performance, using a Southern accent and varying pitches for different ages and genders, warmly reflects the tight-knit sense of community among the black families of Bumblebee, NC, as well as their emotional ups and downs. In particular, her Stella is sweetly earnest but keenly aware of the injustices they face.
  • (3/5)
    The story is set in the 1930's era depression. Told from the perspective of a young girl who saw a KKK cross burning, the primary theme is racism and the pervasive evilness. Stella's father, the minister of the community and another man make a statement regarding the difficulty of black adults voting. A high price is paid for this heroic action.There are hero's and villlian's; there is beauty and ugliness. The characters are well developed and this is a good book for young children to read who are not aware of the ugliness of racism in the south and how terrible it was for black children and adults to experience the sheer ugliness of stupidity.
  • (4/5)
    This story follows Stella as her family as the Klan emerges in her town around the time FDR is running for his first term as president. Stella's dad decides to register to vote. The book explores the black community and the ways members come together during times of adversity. A quick read. Stella is a compelling, strong character. There is a device where she struggles as a writer and her works are peppered at the end of each chapter. I don't know how much that worked for me, but as a whole I found this quick read to be engaging.
  • (3/5)
    Eleven-year-old Stella confronts racism in her small Jim Crow-era North Carolina town. Good story but I've read stronger for this age group addressing the same subjects and themes. As with other Draper novels, there's too much reliance on coincidences, contrivances, and a tidy ending.
  • (4/5)
    In light of recent news headlines this should be required reading for all students in grades 4-6!
  • (4/5)
    Here's a review by my 9 year old daughter:
    It was interesting. learning about people and to see that some people where kind but some like the white doctor wasn't the best. Even if he wasn't very nice, his daughter Was kind. I would like to hear more drama about the clan but it was still a good book.
  • (5/5)
    Stella, her family and the rest of the characters transported me back to Jim Crow Times with its ever present fears and real dangers. The faith, determination, dignity, love, and humor within the black community made life bearable.
  • (1/5)
    I didn't finish this. It just is not compelling in any way; not in character nor in plot nor in writing. I've enjoyed some of Sharon Draper's other books, but this one just isn't up to par.
  • (5/5)
    Read with my 11 year old white son. He loved becoming informed. While we’ve eased into issues of race, before this book he didn’t know about the KKK. Draper presenter the story in such a way that was accessible to his tender heart and allowed us to have many conversations about what it means to be an ally to POC.
  • (4/5)

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    This book would be great for a historical fiction or diversity unit. I love the character of Stella; she is truly lovable and her modest bravery is so admirable. I also liked the inclusion of Stella's writings and that, with practice, her improvement is evident in her writings. In many ways, Stella is inspirational and her tale shows the ugly hate of the segregated south and the community values that it generated.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • (5/5)
    This book is set in the segregated south in the town of Bumblebee North Carolina. I believe that the historical setting was faithfully portrayed. The book talks very vividly about the schools being segregated, how they are treated, fear of the KKK and issues surrounding the right to vote. The book is very political. Equal rights is a political issue, all people having the same freedoms and access to equal jobs, pay, doctors, education, voting rights. All are things discussed in this book.The dialogue did seem suited to the time period, I love the interactions between Stella’s neighborhood and the travelling salesman named Spoonman. During the neighborhood gathering/potluck Stella’s mom pulls together in a fashion reminiscent of Stone soup, everyone brings what they have and the stories they tell are rich in culture and history. I also felt that the late night discussions about what it meant to all of their families that the KKK was becoming a presence in the community again.
  • (5/5)
    STELLA BY STARLIGHT by Sharon M. Draper provides a realistic portrayal of life in the segregated South during the Great Depression. The author skillfully conveys the reality of life in a world where people are treated unfairly because of the color of their skin. From a random beating to a house burning, the scenes that demonstrate the terror instilled by members of the KKK are chilling. Through her use of age-appropriate examples, Draper is able to create convincing scenarios that convey both the injustice as well as the courage needed to survive in this period of intolerance and fear.Many readers will empathized with Stella’s desire to be a writer as well as her difficulty in translating her thoughts into words on paper. Her use of the donated typewriter to write news article may inspire some budding authors.Aimed at the middle grades, this outstanding work of historical fiction should be added to your school library’s growing collection of quality works dealing with African American life in the 20th century.Like the works of Christopher Paul Curtis and Jacqueline Woodson, Draper is able to draw on both African American culture as well as universal human themes. This combination makes it a great book for literature circles, social studies, and language arts activities.The year is just beginning, but put STELLA BY STARLIGHT on your Coretta Scott King Book Award short-list for 2015.(Edelweiss ARC)