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Full Tilt

Full Tilt

Écrit par Emma Scott

Raconté par Nelson Hobbs et Caitlin Kelly


Full Tilt

Écrit par Emma Scott

Raconté par Nelson Hobbs et Caitlin Kelly

évaluations:
4/5 (34 évaluations)
Longueur:
10 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Mar 21, 2017
ISBN:
9781541470521
Format:
Livre audio

Description

Kacey Dawson has always lived life on the edge-impulsively, sometimes recklessly. And now, as lead guitarist for a hot up-and-coming band, she is poised at the brink of fame and fortune. But she is torn between wanting to be a serious musician, and the demons that lure her down the glittering, but alcohol-soaked path of rock stardom. A wrecked concert in Las Vegas threatens to ruin her career entirely. She wakes up with the hangover from hell and no memory of the night before, or how she ended up on her limo driver's couch . . .

Jonah Fletcher is running out of time. He knows his situation is hopeless, and he's vowed to make the most of the handful of months he has left to him. His plans include seeing the opening of his glass installation at a prestigious art gallery . . . they do not include falling in love with a wild, tempestuous rock musician who wound up passed out on his couch.

Jonah sees that Kacey is on a path to self-destruction. He lets her crash with him for a few days to dry out and get her head on straight. But neither of them expected the deep connection they felt, or how that connection could grow so fast from friendship into something more.
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Mar 21, 2017
ISBN:
9781541470521
Format:
Livre audio

À propos de l'auteur

Emma Scott is a writer, marathon runner, and caffeine addict, who lives and writes in the California Bay Area. She has two smart, feisty little girls, a super-supportive husband, and is a demonstrated fan of the Oxford comma. She is also an unabashed Star Wars geek and comic book enthusiast who fell into romance writing when a writing contest prompt turned a 1000-word flash story into a full-blown novel. She also writes epic fantasy that suffers an epic word count.She hopes you enjoy her work, encourages readers to leave feedback, and thinks it's amusing to write about herself in the third person.My fifth novel is a standalone second chance New Adult romance with shades of the paranormal, and will be released Feb 9 2016.Happy reading!


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4.1
34 évaluations / 14 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    This is a great Creepy Carnival book. Blake, his brother Quinn, and their friends Russ & Maggie end up trapped in an otherworldly carnival. The only way out is if they can ride seven rides before dawn. But each ride taps into one of their biggest fears, and no one has ever escaped before... I enjoyed this one. It was fast-paced and creepy with a satisfying ending. It doesn't take long to get to the carnival part and I enjoyed watching Blake try to figure things out.
  • (3/5)
    This was a pull from the shelf because I loved Antsy Does Time earlier this year. This is a much earlier novel in which Blake finds himself in a fantasy carnival-type world trying to redeem his brother’s soul and keep his friends and himself alive in one wild night. Blake must complete seven rides before dawn or he will become a member of the carnival. The rides are similar to real-life and yet—not really. This is a good fantasy introduction for the tweener set and I enjoyed it.
  • (3/5)
    A favorite read for both my 10 and 13 year old children. This is the only book they have ever begged me to read so that we could discuss it together. A page turning ghost carnival race against time to save your soul plot evokes Steven King, while the twist at the end surprised us all. Neal Shusterman knows how to write a good story for all ages.
  • (5/5)
    I read this book without stopping, almost without breathing. It was, in a word, gripping. I would have liked to have seen a little more done with characterization, especially of Quinn (he seemed a little inconsistent in places), but overall I enjoyed this book tremendously.
  • (5/5)
    This book would be good to use when talking about over coming challenges. I think students will like this book because it is a psychological thriller that will keep them turning the page.
  • (5/5)
    A simple horror book about an amusement park isn't good enough for Neal Shusterman. Oh no, he could never write anything so simple as that.Full Tilt is... chilling. And moving. And deep. As fiction fans like to say, "it says something about the human condition." When I first read this book five years ago, I loved it. It terrified me and thrilled me, I suppose just like an amusement park does for other people. Rereading it this time, though, brought a lot of things to life that I had missed before because of my young age and inexperience.Blake dealing with survival guilt. Quinn dealing with depression. Maggie and Russ have their own problems that aren't really explained, but they're still there, which makes even those two supporting characters believable. The way Blake slowly makes his way through ride after ride, gaining confidence and determination, is just plan old impressive.And the rides are chilling to the bone. Terrifying. Neal Shusterman's ability to make stories come to life is awe-inspiring.I would strongly recommend this book to anyone who has or has had survival guilt or depression. And I would strongly recommend this book to everyone else too.
  • (4/5)
    "They say you never know who's the real hero and who's the real coward until you're looking death in the face. I've always been afraid of plenty of things, but fear isn't what makes you a coward. It's how depraved your heart becomes when fear gets pumped through it. I would never climb over the backs of my friends to save myself."Would you? Blake has always been careful -- ever since he was the lone survivor of a school bus crash when he was seven. His brother Quinn has always been the opposite -- rash and impulsive, and always getting into scrapes requiring Blake to rescue him. Tonight is no different -- Quinn has disappeared from the local carnival, and Blake finds him at home, comatose, with an invitation that Blake had been given to another carnival. Blake goes there only to discover that the price of admission is your soul, and the only way out is to survive seven nightmare rides before dawn. No one has escaped the carnival yet, but if Blake is going to save his brother, he's got to try. Each ride is based on one of Blake's deepest fears -- but every ride has a way out as long as you survive it. Surreal, scary, and quite the wild ride all the way through! 7th grade and up.
  • (4/5)
    The first is Full Tilt by Neal Shusterman. Reading Full Tilt reminded me of staying up all night reading some juicy young adult horror novel by someone like R.L. Stine, except with more of a message. One night when Blake and his brother Quinn are at an amusement park, a mysterious worker in a ball-toss game slips him an invitation to ride, and an address. After a terrifying ride on the Kamikaze roller coaster, Blake's had about enough of thrill rides for one night and has no interest in going. When Blake wakes up and something is wrong with his brother, Blake knows he's got no choice but to check out the amusement park.What he finds is a sinister game where riders have to ride five terrifying, life threatening rides before dawn to escape the black magical amusement park. Failure means being stuck in the park forever. Success is facing all your very worst fears embedded in what, from the outside, look like ordinary amusement park rides. Despite a niggling sense that the facing your fears angle is all a bit too after-school special, Full Tilt is an addicting book. The ride ideas and the way Blake's fears are woven into them are pretty ingenious, so ingenious that it takes a while even for Blake and, by extension, readers to figure out how exactly they relate, but once it's revealed, it makes sense. It's the first book I've read in a while that has demanded that I stay up late to finish because I just had to know what the next ride would be and if Blake would succeed in saving himself and his brother. If you're looking for a fun pageturner of a book with a serious twist, Full Tilt is definitely one to try.
  • (2/5)
    Blake goes on a paranormal roller coaster theme park to save his brother. Each ride reveals something hidden inside the rider's heart and mind. But he has to survive seven rides before dawn arrives.... can he do it?

    Ridiculous question, because of course he will since it's a YA book.

    I was interested in the premise and what each ride would reveal, but all of them were fairly straightforward without that many quirks or twists. It was a decent read and fairly quick, but it didn't really push the boundaries of anything. It wasn't exactly scary, not exactly feelings-evoking, not quite feel good, it was just very flat in a lot of areas.

    The character growth and change occurred a little too quickly - shoved in between each ride, I think. The dynamic between the characters didn't really have any depth. Seems like the whole book is an excuse to portray roller coaster rides as something deeper and meaningful.

    Two stars because it was okay. I didn't hate it, but it wasn't that great either. I wouldn't really recommend it to anyone unless you are super bored and you like Shusterman's other books. But really, read something else.
  • (4/5)
    This book starts off fast, wasting no time with detailed introductions. This does result in a bit of confusion at the beginning, but not to worry, it's all cleared up through the rest of the book. It's a real roller coaster ride (pun not really intended ;P) of a book, suspenseful and thrillingly spooky in all the right places. In terms of characters, some of them are really compelling, while others are left slightly flat. Unfortunately, one of those flat ones, in my opinion, was the main character, which made it a less interesting read. I was very glad to see two brothers so close in age as the main characters, I don't think we see enough brothers in contemporary YA fiction, and I'm glad someone out there is writing YA that is appealing to boys. Shusterman has quite the imagination, and he makes up in imagination what he sometimes lacks in the writing itself. The ending was a bit predictable and felt a bit like one of those "it was all a dream" scenarios, although it wasn't quite that drastically bad. Overall, cool premise, neat delivery, but it could have used just a little bit of tweaking here and there.Rating: 4/5
  • (4/5)
    Wow--that Neil Shusterman has a great imagination! The main character, Blake, is a teen who has survivor guilt after being the sole survivor of a school bus crash when he was seven years old. No one has ever talk about it with him but it has been festering in his unconscious, controlling the careful way he has lived his life. His brother Quinn, as so often happens, has taken another road--he lives recklessly, needing constant bail-outs which Blake thinks are his responsibility to provide. Full Tilt is set in an amusement park, where Blake goes, once again to rescue his brother. In this alternate reality, Blake and his friends must successfully get through seven terrifying rides by dawn, or be forever trapped in the park. The book is a fast-paced thrill ride. As an adult, I was wondering at each ride, why is Blake being made to experience this? What is the lesson for him, and for his brother and friends? Shusterman writes a thrilling page-turner that manages to relay a message about facing ourselves and overcoming our challenges. It's short, only 224 pages, which might make it a good choice for reluctant readers. Would be a good pick for middle and high school boys.
  • (5/5)
    Great story, although there was heartbreak, there was so much more love. Great story telling by the narrators
  • (5/5)
    I love this book with my whole heart. Would highly recommend!!!
  • (5/5)
    This book depicts a world of fantasy and magic that should be difficult to believe. However, somehow the author pulls off an incredible use of texture and emotion that makes it impossible to put down. Neal has done it again, making a wonderful book out of a ridiculous idea. Wow!