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A Conspiracy of Kings

A Conspiracy of Kings

Écrit par Megan Whalen Turner

Raconté par Steve West


A Conspiracy of Kings

Écrit par Megan Whalen Turner

Raconté par Steve West

évaluations:
4.5/5 (62 évaluations)
Longueur:
8 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9780062693884
Format:
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Description

Discover the world of the Queen's Thief

New York Times-bestselling author Megan Whalen Turner's entrancing and award-winning Queen's Thief novels bring to life the world of the epics and feature one of the most charismatic and incorrigible characters of fiction, Eugenides the thief. Megan Whalen Turner's Queen's Thief novels are rich with political machinations and intrigue, battles lost and won, dangerous journeys, divine intervention, power, passion, revenge, and deception. The New York Times bestseller A Conspiracy of Kings won the Los Angeles Times Book Award and is perfect for fans of Leigh Bardugo, Marie Lu, Patrick Rothfuss, and George R. R. Martin.

After an attempted assassination and kidnapping, Sophos, heir to the throne of Sounis, disappears. Those who care for him-including the thief Eugenides and the Queen of Eddis-are left to wonder if he is alive and if they will ever see him again. The Queen's Thief novels have been praised by writers, critics, reviewers, and fans and have been honored with glowing reviews, "best of" citations, and numerous awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, a Newbery Honor, the Andre Norton Award shortlist, and the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award. Discover and rediscover the stand-alone companions, The Queen of Attolia, The King of Attolia, A Conspiracy of Kings, and Thick as Thieves, all epic novels set in the world of the Queen's Thief.

Winner of the LA Times Book Award

A New York Times Bestseller

A Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Book

A School Library Journal Best Book

"The Queen's Thief books awe and inspire me. They have the feel of a secret, discovered history of real but forgotten lands. The plot-craft is peerless, the revelations stunning, and the characters flawed, cunning, heartbreaking, exceptional. Megan Whalen Turner's books have a permanent spot on my favorites shelf, with space waiting for more books to come."-Laini Taylor, New York Times-bestselling author of the Daughter of Smoke and Bone novels and Strange the Dreamer

"Unforgettable characters, plot twists that will make your head spin, a world rendered in elegant detail-you will fall in love with every page of these stories. Megan Whalen Turner writes vivid, immersive, heartbreaking fantasy that will leave you desperate to return to Attolia again and again."-Leigh Bardugo, #1 New York Times-bestselling author of Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom

"Megan Whalen Turner is one of my all-time favorite writers . . . impossible to put down."-Holly Black, award-winning and New York Times-bestselling author of the Modern Faerie Tale series and The Darkest Part of the Forest

"Romance, intrigue, mystery, surprises, and sheer beautiful writing."-Cassandra Clare, award-winning and New York Times-bestselling author of The Mortal Instruments and Lady Midnight

"The world Turner creates is so tangible that not only do I believe in its characters, I almost believe in its gods."-Kristin Cashore, award-winning and New York Times-bestselling author of the Graceling Realm series

"A Conspiracy of Kings brings the sweetest, sharpest kind of reading pleasure. Megan Whalen Turner's books are pure joy."-Rebecca Stead, Newbery Medalist and New Yo

Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9780062693884
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

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À propos de l'auteur

Megan Whalen Turner is the New York Times–bestselling and award-winning author of five stand-alone novels set in the world of the Queen’s Thief. Return of the Thief marks her long-awaited conclusion to the epic and unforgettable story of the thief Eugenides—a story more than twenty years in the making. She has been awarded a Newbery Honor and a Boston Globe–Horn Book Honor and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Young Adult Literature. She has twice been a finalist for the Andre Norton Award and won the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children’s Literature. www.meganwhalenturner.org


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  • (4/5)
    The fourth installment of the Queen’s Thief fantasy series is called A Conspiracy of Kings and features as it’s main character Sophos, the heir to the Kingdom of Sounis. As civil war erupts in his country armed men arrive at the villa that houses himself, his mother and sisters. He escapes by selling himself into slavery and when the opportunity comes he escapes and finds his way to the country of Attolia and seeks the aid of his friend Eugenides, the King of Attolia. Sophos and Eugenides, along with both the Queen of Attolia and the Queen of Eddis hatch a plot to see Sophos placed on the throne and recover control of his country.I have loved all the books in this series, and A Conspiracy of Kings may just be my favorite one so far. Sophos is much more transparent than Eugenides as well as being painfully honest and not entirely sure if he should be the King of Sounis. He matures and develops over the course of the book, also his romance with the Queen of Eddis is downplayed but nevertheless is one that I was rooting for. I know there are two more books in the series, and I expect that these books will deal with the upcoming showdown between these three small kingdoms and the Empire of Mede and I, for one, can hardly wait to see what happens next.
  • (4/5)
    A Conspiracy of Kings is the fourth book in the Queen’s Thief series, and I would suggest you at least read books two and three beforehand – The Queen of Attolia and The King of Attolia. While plot of the fourth book mostly stands alone, there’s a lot of background politics going on that it would be useful to have read some of the previous books for.Sophos, the heir to the throne of Sounis, reappears unexpectedly in Attolia. Where has he been all this time? A Conspiracy of Kings tells the story of Sophos’s adventure and the beginnings of his rule as king.The series is often classified as YA, but aside from the shorter length and the lack of “adult content,” it’s not very different from most non-YA second world fantasy novels. Actually there is one major difference: there’s no magic as such in this series. However, the gods of the kingdoms to appear to actually exist to some extent and the main characters may have meaningful dreams or receive divine assistance.The overarching story of the series has been the Mede Empire threatening from across the sea. Due to the existence of the Great Powers on the continent, the Medes cannot attack Sounis, Eddis, and Attolia directly unprovoked. But in A Conspiracy of Kings, the Medes have taken advantage of a rebellion within Sounis to play for power.Sophos has always been more interested in poetry and philosophy than ruler ship, but the events of A Conspiracy of Kings will force him to take responsibility and make some hard choices. To what lengths will he go to protect his country from the Medes?While The Queen of Attolia remains my favorite novel in the series, I thought A Conspiracy of Kings was definitely a solid installment. I would recommend this series to anyone who likes thoughtful, character based fantasy.Originally posted on The Illustrated Page.
  • (5/5)
    The premise: ganked from publisher's website: Sophos, heir to the throne of Sounis, has disappeared without a trace. Eugenides, the new and unlikely king of Attolia, has never stopped wondering what happened to his friend. Nor has the Queen of Eddis, who once offered Sophos her hand. They send spies. They pay informants. They appeal to the gods. But as time goes by, it becomes less and less certain that they will ever see their friend alive again.Battles are fought, bribes are offered, and conspiracies are set in motion. Across the sea, a ruthless empire watches for even the slightest weakness. And Sophos, anonymous and alone, bides his time. Until, drawing on his memories of Gen, Pol, the magus -- and Eddis -- Sophos sets out on an adventure that will change all of their lives forever.My Rating: Couldn't Put It DownI'm still amazed that I had such an adverse reaction to book two, The Queen of Attolia, because I'm such an avid and devoted reader of the series now. It's a telling sign that while reading an installment for the first time, that I want to go BACK to the beginning and re-read the series all over again from the start, and I definitely want to do that with Turner's Queen's Thief series. Once it wraps up, and I have no idea if this is the last book (surely not!), or if Turner's got another title or two up her sleeve. But I utterly enjoy reading her work, exploring her worlds, and watching how characters interact with each other and how those interactions have so much weight politically for these books. I'm so glad I'm finally caught up on this series, and if there's going to be more, I cannot wait to read it.Spoilers, yay or nay?: Nay. There's really not much for me to spoil, as I'm spending too much time marveling over this series. If you want the full review, just click the link below, which goes to my blog. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. REVIEW: Megan Whalen Turner's A CONSPIRACY OF KINGSHappy Reading!
  • (4/5)
    A Conspiracy of Kings has a different tone from the rest of the series – the first person POV is back (although not completely), and Sophos is back, after all, this is his story.In this book we get to know what happened to Sophos, whose fate has been mentioned and speculated in the previous book. And since it is Sophos himself who tells it, we see who he really is, not just the innocent blushing boy from The Thief. And since that book his life has not been easy. First his uncle, the King of Sounis, decides that the magus is not a suitable tutor (for his purposes, of course), then comes exile to island of Letnos and a whole string of tutors who are bad, drunk, silly, idiot or any combination of those. But that is not the worse part, when Sounis dies, Sophos becomes king, and everyone knows he is spineless and gullible, so everyone wants to be the one pulling his strings. First comes abduction and betrayal, then Sophos manages to escape only to become a slave, and then he has to escape again, while trying to decide whether he actually wants to be king.This book is divided in four parts, two of those narrated by Sophos (and it takes a while to become apparent to whom he is telling his story), and the other two, when the gang (as I call Gen, Attolia, Eddis and Sophos) is all together. Sophos's story is brilliant, poignant, and very true to his character. One cannot help but feel for him. But there is also his relationship with the other characters. Attolia, the one he has had less contact with was actually surprising – I could see the beginning of a friendship there. With Gen, it was heartbreaking, because he is no longer just a rowdy boy thief, he is king, of a rival country, one that is at war with his. And since this is Sophos story, we don't get much of Gen's inner feelings, only glimpses, and at first he comes across way too cold.And then there is Eddis, who once proposed marriage to him, only now there are a lot more political trappings with that marriage. For once, I wished Megan Whalen Turner focused more on the love stories of her characters (a character in The King of Attolia says "the love of kings and queens is beyond the compass of us lesser mortals", and it's certainly true for this series). Even more, because in the light of the ending, Eddis's feelings don't sound as true as they could have (I know they are true, but still...).Overall it was a very good book, mostly because of Sophos development (who, in my mind, already is Sounis), who is a great character, and thus making up for the fact that there is less Gen (and less than stellar Gen). But I expected more of the ending. It wasn't bad, but I was under the impression this was going to be the last book of the series (now I know there are plans for two more, yay!), and as such it lacked the grand finale vibe. Still, it was a decent ending, with a promise of more adventures to come.Also at Spoilers and Nuts
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyable, but not as compelling as the previous book in the series the King of Attolia. Solid addition the story arc.
  • (5/5)
    I made a point of not reading the blurb before starting this one and that was the best idea - what a beautiful treat to have one of my favourite characters return to narrate his part of the story. The stakes are high in this and it's all starting to come together in an astonishing way - I couldn't see where the author was going with the story as a whole before (though it certainly didn't prevent me from falling head over heels in love with the books) but it's really obvious here and the plot's heading towards an astonishing end. Perfect characterization as usual and just the right amount of twists. Very gifted storyteller. I think I'll reread this series once it's completely done and I'm already looking forward to doing that. Love love love.
  • (3/5)
    Okay, I liked the first book and loved the second two. I am less fond of this one, though. The trouble is the structure. More than three quarters of it is Sophos telling his story. Less than a quarter of the entire book is *showing* rather than telling, and sadly, those are the only parts of the book that really feel alive. I wish very much that Turner had dropped the first person for Sophos' sections -- or at least dropped the storyteller conceit.

    The other problem is that while I like Sophos okay, I don't love him like I love Eugenides and Eddis. Then again, not being a twelve year old boy, I'm hardly the target demographic.

    More fannishly, this is a wonderful slashfest. I could happily offer/ask for Gen/Sophos for Yuletide because their love, while apparently platonic, is canon. *g*

    I am assuming (and hope very hard) that there will be a book 5 and that this was merely a necessary transition on the road to war against the Mede Empire. There are vast possibilities for story there, so I'm looking forward to where this series goes next. Hopefully it will have more Gen and Eddis in it.
  • (3/5)
    Each of the books in this series is very different from each other, and this last was no exception.
    As Sophos' story, it was very different. I feel like this is really the only thing that the book could have been about, but I didn't quite like it as much as the others, for some reason. I'm not quite sure why, because I did like Sophos, and I was engrossed in his story, and delighted by the interactions between him and Eddis. However, when everything was revealed in the end, I felt a bit confused, like I might benefit from a re-reading.

  • (5/5)
    I really love this series. The shifting point of view usually bugs me but here it works really well with the story. I'm amazed at how complex the court intrigue and power struggles are. A very tight and complex story with humor and wit layered throughout. Love, love, love.
  • (5/5)
    Last we heard of Sophos, Eugenides receives intelligence that a group of rebels captured the heir of Sounis, and no one is sure whether he is alive or dead. In this story, readers get to learn Sophos' story, primarily told by him as narrator, when he is captured while in exile and sneaked off the island disguised as a slave.Faithful readers of the series will remember Sophos as the young blusher, looking up to Ambiades and the Magus during their adventure in The Thief. Even while staying true to his character - and keeping readers on their toes by shifting to his perspective believably - this story explores how he grows into a man and king. Reading this today and yesterday, I was so full of anticipation and hurry hurry hurry, I need to know what happens, that I read the book over two days, taking a total of about four hours. I think I would have to reread it to really do the story justice and figure out how I like it in terms of the rest of the series, but I have no doubt I would read it again.
  • (2/5)
    Sophos bides his time living as a slave after escaping a kidnapping attempt, eventually reclaiming his kingdom. Although the action sequences are involving, I don't think most teen readers will be fascinated by the court intrigue. Also, the author jumps right in with names and places in this imaginary world with little explanation for the possibly confused reader. I found no indication on the book itself or CIP that it was fourth in a series.
  • (5/5)
    Another great book by Megan Whalen Turner! The Conspiracy of Kings was different from the other books in this series being from Sophos' point of view. At first I wasn't sure about this, but I warmed up to it as I got used to him narrating. I found his interactions with Gen particularly interesting as I had less faith in him doing the right thing then I do when its from his point of view. All in all, I feel this book lives up to the series as a whole and look forward to the next book.
  • (4/5)
    Another adventurous romp of political intrigue, betrayal, revenge, and romance through the 3 countries and palaces of this alternate world. This is book 4 in the series.
  • (5/5)
    I couldn't stop once I started reading.I hadn't expected to like Sophos but he won me over.Looking at things from the perspective of someone who is aware that he's a straight arrow and not quite as clever or sly as the Thief was interesting.In the end Sophos surprises himself and the reader that being different is not quite so bad.And the climax was wonderful.
  • (4/5)
    I was a latecomer to this apparently classic-to-my-generation fantasy series, but I quite loved the preceding books, The Thief, The Queen of Attolia, and The King of Attolia.A Conspiracy of Kings lives in the same vein as these others, but with a few noticable differences. The most prominent is that we lose our main (wonderful) protagonist, Gen, in favor of a minor character from the previous three books. While Saphos is an interesting and solid character, he doesn't shine near as bright as Gen, and so neither does the tale. He's also very different - he doesn't have the cunning or wit to make the book quite the page turner I might have wished for.Still, the book is solid, the plot entertaining enough, and the writing as always lovely. I'm invested in what happens to these lands now, not just these characters, so on that front I quite enjoyed it, and would likely enjoy any more to come.I recommend it to fans of the series, but probably not to anyone else.
  • (5/5)
    It's been a year since I devoured the first three books in this series, but within a few sentences I was entirely immersed in Turners rich world. Oh, how I love these characters, where more is unsaid than said, and every motion has weight and meaning. I loved seeing Gen and his queen from another's point of view, and how delightful to see Sophos grow up.I'd give this, or rather I'd push the first book of the series into the hands of anyone who is interested in retellings of mythology or classical Greek tales, in political intrigue, or in character driven adventure.
  • (5/5)
    After the third book I think I said these keep getting better and better. Maybe a plateau has been reached but what an impressive plateau it is. Everything about these books is so well imagined and so well portrayed it's fascinating. The characters are so very complex and yet the story is so interesting that a lot of these complexities could be overlooked and still these books would be a great work. The personalities, the psychology, the religious/mythological aspects, the politics and court behavior, the strategies, everything is just so good it's hard to describe. The Thief himself is one of the best and most well developed characters I've ever come across.

    This series has been marketed as MG and The Thief was a Newbery honor book and while I'm very happy about that I have to say that this is the most extreme examples of my being at a total loss as to how these decisions are made.
  • (4/5)
    Still good. I have to remind myself of Sophos' badassery, but the lack of a few things we loved from the previous books (like more of the Gen that Sophos used to know) keeps downplaying this .

    I love these covers. Sophos looks dashing in this one.
  • (5/5)
    In the fourth book of the Thief of Eddis series, Turner expertly pulls together numerous threads that have been laid out since the first book. The first part of the story is told through Sophos, the heir to Sounis who one day finds his world transformed and needs to figure out how to right it. Any plot information I give will be a spoiler but the story as with the other ones delicately balances young people growing up and finding what they're willing to do as they decide how to use their power. The main characters are kings and queens but also growing young people, the way that Turner writes this balances makes this series a fantastic read.As a student of the Classics, I appreciate the research Turner has done into the Greek world which isn't obvious in the books but creates the feel of a familiar but new world. I would recommend these books to an older middle grade reader as there's violence that is treated honestly.
  • (3/5)
    My girlfriend found this book much less compelling than the others, partially due to the relative lack of Eugenides. I have to agree to some extent, though I found it extremely easy compared to Connie Willis' Doomsday Book, which I was working on for pretty much a week. Megan Whalen Turner's writing is much easier to read, I found, if only in comparison.

    I can see how this book drags, though. Sophos is not the most brilliant of narrators, and some parts seem glossed over and idealised -- his time in captivity, working as a slave, for example -- and other parts seem to be dragged out far too long, i.e. the negotiations in Attolia. Sophos' feelings didn't really come through to me with any urgency.

    There were interesting parts, though -- the involvement of the gods, which expands the growing mythological background of this book, and struggle against the Medes. And somehow despite the faults I mentioned, it's still pretty easy to read and doesn't require mental acrobatics, without being dumbed down.

    I definitely didn't like it as much as the second and third books in this series, those.
  • (4/5)
    I've put off reviewing this book for weeks now, but I might as well spit it out. A Conspiracy of Kings is good...but it's not as good as the Thief trilogy. Under normal circumstances, I probably wouldn't hold that against the author - the Thief trilogy is so good it would be pretty darn hard to equal it, let alone top it. But these aren't normal circumstances, because Turner goes out of her way to remind us again and again of how much better the Thief books were. A Conspiracy of Kings is set in the same world as the Thief trilogy, and its protagonist Sophos sits squarely in Eugenides' shadow from start to finish.

    I liked Sophos, I thought his story was interesting, and the writing is excellent of course...but Eugenides (Gen) seems to be lurking in the background of every major plot twist. Gen is such a compelling character, such a scene-stealer, that his mere presence sort of dooms any book that's not directly about him. When Sophos is alone, or far from Gen, he'll ask himself, "What would Gen do?"...and when he has the opportunity, he hies off to Attolia to ask. When Gen is nearby, he dominates the story. He's in charge, he delivers the tough love, he plants the seeds of Sophos' stratagems. And when it's not Gen, it's Attolia.

    A Conspiracy of Kings kind of felt like a satellite, caught in the gravitational pull of the Thief books. I liked it - Turner has a gift, and I'll still buy anything she writes, no questions asked, but I kind of hope she either writes another book about Gen or cuts him out entirely.
  • (5/5)
    Amazon preorder
    A "drop everything and read this" book.

    Turner's world with kings and queens and Medes, and guns and crossbows and such is a non-standard fantasy world based in a Greek sensibility and culture, but seamlessly fitted so that you don't even think about analysing it - it just fits naturally.

    Twisty, twisty, twisty yummy plotting. Once or twice I got some POV whiplash (a mixture of first and third but the whiplash is deliberate and adds to the book.)

    And people surprising themselves in their growth.

    SPOILERS


    I love the glimpse at the ongoing development of Gen's relationship with Attolia, but that Turner doesn't let that take over the story of Sophos (and the development of what goes on with Eddis)
  • (4/5)
    This is Sopho's story, and while I enjoyed it and thought the author did a wonderful job showing his growing up, I missed Gen. The humor and close relationships between the four rulers in these books always make me happy, even though they are constantly faced with terrible decisions and little personal time together. This is another great book in the series.
  • (3/5)
    This book is the 4th in a very good series and I read the first three at the beginning of this year. Each of these books is quite different from the others both in style and subject. Our primary character here is Sophos, heir to the Kingdom of Sounis. He played a good part in the first book in this series, "The Thief", and then he vanished. The characters in the stories and we the readers did not know what had happened to him. Now we learn his story. The prologue pulled me right back into the series and set up a nice start to the novel. After the prologue the story is told primarily as a first person narrative by Sophos that takes us back in time to early in this series and moves us to the present of the last novel. I really liked learning more about the world and the people in it. However I had difficulty sympathizing with Sophos. I found this book enjoyable and full of the surprises we have come to expect, but I think I'd rank it as the weakest of the series. That isn't a real criticism - these books are very good, esp for readers like me who prefer light fantasy rather than all the dark magic and faerie stuff. 3 - 3 1/2 stars
  • (4/5)
    Given the other reviews and information I had read about this, I expected it to be a very dense read that took me a lot of time but instead I found it quite the page-turner and difficult to put down.

    Sophos is the heir to his kingdom's throne, but an heir who is not respected or expected to ever actually become king since it is assumed his uncle will marry. Since Sophos is a bit of a disappointment (too intellectual, not ruthless enough - I mean, he likes poetry for goodness sake!) to the current ruler, he's sent off to a country estate with his mother and sisters which suits Sophos just fine - until the raiders/kidnappers arrive. Then things start to get complicated. This is really a coming-of-age story as Sophos tries to figure out if he has what it takes to be a king and if he wants to have what it takes to be a king.

    On Heavy Medal, the mock Newbery blog I follow, there was a lot of talk about whether or not A Conspiracy of Kings stood on its own or if it was too confusing for those who hadn't read the rest of the series. This is the first Turner I've read and I had no trouble following the plot, but I suspect that my reading experience would have been richer if I'd already read the rest of the series. As it is I look forward to reading the others and then (if I can find the time) re-reading this to see what changes for me.
  • (3/5)
    The first third of this book is quite good, the second two thirds lapse into the histrionics of the previous two books. This book ended in such a way that makes one think that Turner plans to write another. If she does so, it is to be hoped that she'll stick with the wry humour of the first part of the book.
  • (5/5)
    Note: This review contains possible spoilers for THE THIEF, THE QUEEN OF ATTOLIA, and THE KING OF ATTOLIA. Sophos, prince of Sounis, never wanted to be king. He preferred to stay in semi-exile, content to study, hoping against hope that his uncle who is Sounis would produce an heir. Then, one day, Sophos is kidnapped and sold as a slave in his own kingdom. There, as a laborer on the estate of a rebel lord, Sophos finds that he is satisfied to live the life of a slave, with all freedom and responsibility taken away from him . . . and he realizes this, to his shame. What sort of king might he have been? What sort of man is he? When Sophos discovers a secret plot and has a chance to escape and return to his rightful place, these questions become more than simply theoretical.This novel, the long-awaited continuation of Megan Whalen Turner's Queen's Thief series, is sure to delight fans. Though the perspective is that of Sophos, a minor character in the other books, old friends Eddis, Attolia, the magus, and of course, Eugenides appear as well. With Turner's usual witty dialogue and intricate plotting, this book grips the reader from the first chapter to the mostly-satisfying conclusion. Just enough loose ends remain dangling to allow fans room to speculate on the content of the next book, whenever it arrives. Though the plot in A CONSPIRACY OF KINGS can stand on its own, it is vastly preferable that readers new to the series start with THE THIEF in order to get the background they will need to fully enjoy the story.
  • (4/5)
    Several years ago, a boy and his tutor sprang another boy from jail, to be their thief in a quest for a holy gem. Now that thief is King of Attolia, and the other little boy has become King of Sounis. Only by trusting to their friendship with each other, and by being good men and wise kings, can they defeat the Mede's invasion.

    I love the way characters are alternately revealed and concealed in these books. Gen is a spineless whiner when he meet him, revealed to be a courageous and sneaky genius, then revealed again to have a complete lack of confidence in some matters. Nothing I would have ever expected, but all completely clear in retrospect. The same with Attolia, who seemed old and cruel when I first read her, but gradually seemed younger and--well, still cruel in cases, but with good reason for her actions, and also possessed of a great sense of humor. Or Sophos, who never thinks of himself as kind or generous or brave, and yet reveals himself to be exactly those things with his every action. The characters alone would make me love these books, but they also have beautifully constructed plots and a truly unique, complex, and believable world.
  • (4/5)
    The fourth book in Megan Whalen Turner's Queen's Thief series, A Conspiracy of Kings, isn't quite what I was expecting, but, once I got past the initial shock, I found that the novel was equally as enjoyable as previous installments.This time, the focus of the novel is on young Sophos, the reluctant heir to the throne of Sounis. After his home is attacked by enemies of the crown, he is sold into slavery and makes his way to Attolia. Once there, he meets up with the famous Queen's Thief Eugenides, who has grown into a much more capable and wise king than in King of Attolia. While Sophos grows into his role as heir and works to protect his kingdom, Eugenides exercised his skills at political intrigue and pulls the strings from behind the scenes. With plenty of expected twists and turns and an exciting new character, Conspiracy is a great entry into the series.Turner's writing has grown into somewhat mature and beautiful, weaving lush illustrations and a fascinating world. The characters feel realistic, and have really shown development over the last few books into the fascinating characters here. Some fans may have trouble with the stronger focus on Sophos, with somewhat sparse attention going to Eugenides, though he is around enough to pull the strings.If you're a fan of this series or just enjoy a good YA adventure novel, pick this book up. Though it helps to have read the previous novels, you can still enjoy Conspiracy on its own.
  • (3/5)
    This book isn't as strong as the other three in the series, but it was still enjoyable in the context of the other books. If you haven't read the first three books in the Queen's Thief series, don't start with this one.