Découvrez votre prochain livre audio préféré

Devenez membre dès aujourd'hui et écoutez gratuitement pendant 30 jours
The King of Attolia

The King of Attolia

Écrit par Megan Whalen Turner

Raconté par Steve West


The King of Attolia

Écrit par Megan Whalen Turner

Raconté par Steve West

évaluations:
4.5/5 (72 évaluations)
Longueur:
10 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9780062693853
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre

Description

New York Times-bestselling author Megan Whalen Turner’s entrancing and award-winning Queen’s Thief novels bring to life the world of the epics and feature one of the most charismatic and incorrigible characters of fiction, Eugenides the thief. Megan Whalen Turner’s Queen’s Thief novels are rich with political machinations and intrigue, battles lost and won, dangerous journeys, divine intervention, power, passion, revenge, and deception. Perfect for fans of Leigh Bardugo, Marie Lu, Patrick Rothfuss, and George R. R. Martin.

Eugenides, no stranger to desperate circumstances, has gotten himself into difficulties he can’t get out of. Used to being treated with a certain measure of wariness, if not respect, he suffers the pranks, insults, and intrigue of the Attolian court with dwindling patience. As usual, nothing is as it appears when he rescues a hot-headed young soldier in the Palace Guard. The Queen’s Thief novels have been praised by writers, critics, reviewers, and fans and have been honored with glowing reviews, “best of” citations, and numerous awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, a Newbery Honor, the Andre Norton Award shortlist, and the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award. Discover and rediscover the stand-alone companions, The Queen of Attolia, The King of Attolia, A Conspiracy of Kings, and Thick as Thieves, all epic novels set in the world of the Queen’s Thief.

School Library Journal Best Book
Horn Book Fanfare
ALA Top 10 Best Book for Young Adults
New York Public Library Books for the Teen Age

“The Queen’s Thief books awe and inspire me. They have the feel of a secret, discovered history of real but forgotten lands. The plot-craft is peerless, the revelations stunning, and the characters flawed, cunning, heartbreaking, exceptional. Megan Whalen Turner’s books have a permanent spot on my favorites shelf, with space waiting for more books to come.”—Laini Taylor, New York Times-bestselling author of the Daughter of Smoke and Bone novels and Strange the Dreamer

"Unforgettable characters, plot twists that will make your head spin, a world rendered in elegant detail—you will fall in love with every page of these stories. Megan Whalen Turner writes vivid, immersive, heartbreaking fantasy that will leave you desperate to return to Attolia again and again."—Leigh Bardugo, #1 New York Times-bestselling author of Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom

“One of the most fascinating and original children’s fantasies to appear in years. . . . Rarely does one see a hero as psychologically knowing and irresistibly attractive as Turner’s Thief.”—The Horn Book (starred review)

“A winner.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Eugenides, the former Thief of Eddis, is back and just as clever as ever.”—School Library Journal (starred review)
Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9780062693853
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre


À propos de l'auteur

Megan Whalen Turner is the New York Times–bestselling and award-winning author of five stand-alone novels set in the world of the Queen’s Thief. Return of the Thief marks her long-awaited conclusion to the epic and unforgettable story of the thief Eugenides—a story more than twenty years in the making. She has been awarded a Newbery Honor and a Boston Globe–Horn Book Honor and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Young Adult Literature. She has twice been a finalist for the Andre Norton Award and won the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children’s Literature. www.meganwhalenturner.org

Lié à The King of Attolia

Livres audio associé
Articles associés

Avis

Ce que les gens pensent de The King of Attolia

4.6
72 évaluations / 42 Avis
Qu'avez-vous pensé ?
Évaluation : 0 sur 5 étoiles

Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    The King of Attolia is the third in the Queen’s Thief series, which starts with The Thief. I would suggest reading at least The Queen of Attolia beforehand to know the background on the different characters going in. Note – there will be inevitable spoilers for previous books in this review.The King of Attolia is a introspective, character based YA fantasy novel. Honestly, if I hadn’t known it was marketed as YA, I wouldn’t have guessed. The characters ages are never explicitly stated, although we know Eugenides to be young. It’s also has very low levels of magic. There’s a bit of communicating with the gods, but nothing beyond that. Certainly, there’s no wizards or dragons.The King of Attolia takes up not too long after The Queen of Attolia left off. Eugenides has married Attolia (Irene), but the court absolutely hates him. They consider him to be weak and stupid, and to be fair, he doesn’t give them many reasons to think otherwise.The majority of the novel is told from the point of view of Costis, a palace guard. Costis has the misfortune of losing his temper at the king and punching Eugenides in the face. Certain he’s about to be executed, Costis is instead made Eugenides personal guard. Costis provides the perspective of an outsider and lets the reader see Eugenides from the perspective of the court. Costis gradually comes to see more and more of who we know Eugenides to be from previous books.The strength of this series is the characterization, which is excellent. There’s so many complexities and subtleties going on. All of these characters feel realistic, and the joy of the series comes from getting to understand them. It’s a pleasure to spend time in their company, and Eugenides is relentlessly charming.Plot wise, The King of Attolia is slower paced book focused around court intrigue. It reminds me a lot of The Goblin Emperor, actually. My main criticism is that there’s a bit of a lull about a hundred pages from the end, where it seems like everything’s wrapped up. There’s still somethings to be taken care of, but it throws off the pacing.I’d recommend The King of Attolia for those looking for a quiet but well wrought shorter fantasy novel.Originally posted on The Illustrated Page.
  • (4/5)
    The King of Attolia feels different than The Thief and The Queen of Attolia. That is not to say that it's bad, but after two superb books, this one seemed more laid back. It is still the story of Gen, but this time we get to see it from someone else's eyes. And this someone else is a new character in the series – Costis. Costis is a royal guard, and very much loyal to his Queen. And since there is much speculation on whether she had any choice in marrying the King, it means he is not going out of his way to protect him. But when he punches the King in face he knows he has gone too far. Actually he doesn't really understand how he got to that point, but since he is also a very honourable person, he awaits his punishment. He does get it, in a way, but not what he expected. He becomes the King's sparring partner, his guard, and sometimes his confident. And through the eyes of Costis we get to see Gen, that now needs to be a bit more covert about his tricks, and who has to comes to terms that he is a king.At first I wasn't sure if I was going to like The King of Attolia – it was too different comparing to the previous books. There didn't seem to be much of a plot at the beginning – no wars to fight, no jewels to steal. There is a plot, off course, but it's not action-centered, it's more of a coming to terms with responsibility. And also about loyalty.There is also a small insight about the relationship of Attolia and Gen, but again, mostly through Costis eyes. It did work for me, because not only it allowed me to see into the relationship, but Costis was also learning something. And by the end of the book I had come to like Costis. He might not be as memorable as the other main characters, but he developed very well throughout the book, and his love-hate-incomprehension relationship with Gen was hilarious at times.I did like The King of Attolia, but not as much as the first two. It was a fun read, with a peek into Attolia's court life, with some twists, and some laughs. What I found myself missing was Sophos, who hasn't appeared since book 1, but has been mentioned a lot. There is a bit of an intrigue with his disappearance that is not resolved (it is in the next book, though).Also at Spoilers and Nuts
  • (5/5)
    The premise: ganked from BN.com: By scheming and theft, the Thief of Eddis has become King of Attolia. Eugenides wanted the queen, not the crown, but he finds himself trapped in a web of his own making. Attolia's barons seethe with resentment, the Mede emperor is returning to the attack, and the king is surrounded by the subtle and dangerous intrigue of the Attolian court. When a naive young guard expresses his contempt for the king in no uncertain terms, he is dragged by Eugenides into the center of the political maelstrom. Like the king, he cannot escape the difficulties he makes for himself. Poor Costis knows he is the victim of the king's caprice, but he discovers a reluctant sympathy for Eugenides as he watches the newly crowned king struggle against his fate.My RatingMust Have: it's very, very close to a "Keeper Shelf" because I'm very, very tempted to sit down with the first three books and read them all over again. The King of Attolia was beautiful, and I'm not sure what else I can say. When I finished, I just sat there, savoring it, not wanting to rush to the next book in my TBR pile because I simply wanted let the book resonate with me. There's so much beauty here, and what a heroic and clever journey for Eugenides. It's a quiet, subtle fantasy that delights the mind and warms the heart PROVIDED you already have the first two books under your belt. Mind you, this could be read as a stand-alone, but you're missing a whole other dimension to this book if you do so. So don't. This book is by far the best of the three, and I can honestly say I look forward to the fourth book in the series, A Conspiracy of Kings, once it's available in paperback (though I won't say no to a free hardcover if it came my way). I did get the bonus of a short story in the back of my The King of Attolia copy, which focused on a childhood experience between the girl who would become Eddis and the gods, and that too was beautiful. Honestly, I have to say I love the way Turner handles the magic and religion of this series, as it's honest while being fictional, honest without being trite. Fantastic work, and I highly recommend this book, let alone the series, to anyone who enjoys reading fantasy but hasn't yet checked this out. Just note: The Thief is very different in tone and style than the rest of the books, so don't be jarred like I originally was when I read The Queen of Attolia. :)Review style: I'm going to talk about why time heals (some) reading wounds, how the style isn't as jarring this time around and why, and how having the first two books under your belt really helps the enjoyment of the novel even though it could be read as a stand-alone, and lastly, how this series just doesn't feel like YA in the slightest, and how I'm not convinced that the characters I'm reading about are even teenagers. Spoilers? Unlike Eugenides, I'll behave. The full review is in my LJ, for anyone who's interested. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)REVIEW: Megan Whalen Turner's THE KING OF ATTOLIAHappy Reading!
  • (3/5)
    Irritating, punctuated by intervals of interesting.

    Others have already expressed the gist of my dissatisfaction--if it weren't for the good bits being very good, this would be a one or two star book. As it is, I'm basically done with the series--I thought 2 was a huge let-down after 1, and 3 is much the same if not slightly worse.

    The author has created some wonderful characters and then kept them away from us. She's created compelling relationships that we don't get to see. Eventually (not really a spoiler) you from-time-to-time find out that some interesting things were happening while she wasn't telling you about them, which is maddening.

    My favourite kind of writing will let you in enough on the plan to lure you in, but withholds enough to keep its eventual unfolding surprising. Not here. I'm done.

    (Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s).
  • (5/5)
    Great Book!I love the way the story builds. Since I read the prior books I know there is much ore to Eugenides than what Costis sees. But what is Eugenides up to?
  • (5/5)
    Eugenides is now King of Attolia. He only took the position to avert a Mede invasion...and because he's desperately in love with the Queen of Attolia. He admires her strength and power, and does not want to rule as king, afraid that he'll take that away from her, or that he'll be forced into a role he does not want. Instead, he plays the fool. His deceptions, and the machinations of the Attolian court, all come to a head at last. All of this is slowly revealed via the perspective of Costis, a young and honorable guardsman who dislikes his new king but gradually comes to respect him against his will.

    I adored this book, which showcases both how incredible our beloved characters are, and how much they love each other. I love the relationship between Gen and Irene, tangled up as it is with pride, love, and memories of past brutality. And I love all the intrigues, which made perfect sense once they were revealed but were rather too smart for me to figure out on my own.

  • (5/5)
    When ever I pick up a book about our dear Thief, I expect to put it down and do something else for at least part of my day. That never really seems to happen. This story, like the rest of the books, is so compelling and interesting and fun that I just keep reading it. The characters and dialogue are of course fantastic, but twists and turns of the story are great as well. The writing itself if also very good. These books are for a bit of a mature audience as they can be a little violent. I highly recommend the whole series.
  • (5/5)
    THIS IS MY FAVORITE BOOK IN THE SERIES.I'm a sucker for outside point of view and competence, and this book has both in spades. Costis is an immensely good-hearted but kind of blockheaded character. He's irritatingly noble, but lovely. His devotion to his queen is beautiful, and his derision of the king gives me life.Furthermore, seeing he outside view of the Eugenides-Attolia relationship is actually really amazing. After the Queen of Attolia, it's a little ambiguous whether they'll succeed as a marriage, but in the King of Attolia, it's made clear that despite their old issues, they well and truly love each other.And Eugenides fighting off all the assassins himself--that was great.Final desperate hope: Please don't let this be the last we see of Costis. It's possible he was just a character who was meant to illustrate the people's opinion of Eugenides. It's possible he doesn't serve any purpose other than that. BUT. I am still so, so attached to him and his bantering relationship with the king, and I would love more of that.
  • (5/5)
    Super short review b/c this was just pure epicness, through and through! Haven't read a fantasy so good in quite a while. I feel like the first two in the series were pretty much building up to this perfection, even though they were decently good in their own rights! I think the only problem I had with it was my wanting more Attolia/Gen goodness and yet I still wouldn't add anything to keep it as enigmatic as possible. Gonna stop rambling words at 3 in the morning now, but yes. Loved, loved it (best read of the year, maybe?)
  • (2/5)
    Deeply disappointing. What seemed so promising at the start reads like self-indulgent slash fic once it really gets going. Goopy.
  • (4/5)
    This is probably my favorite book yet in the series. I didn't think Ms. Turner could surprise me when it came to Gen, but she manages it all the same. This story is told primarily from the viewpoint of Costis who goes from insulting the king to being his most loyal defender. I especially loved the scenes between Gen and Irene. Beautiful.
  • (4/5)
    Loved this one, once I got over the POV change. I think I'd like to re-read these in about a year, once I've forgotten enough, and see how I feel about the first one then.

    This book plays a deeper game than the second. It's also a lot of fun, and deepens some of the characters appreciably. The plot twists and wriggles, and it's a nice ride.

  • (5/5)
    This has so many levels of awesome its hard to pick which is the best. But seriously Gen is one of my all time favorite YA characters.
  • (4/5)
    Continuing the story of Eugenides, this installment follows the former thief in his new role as the King of Attolia. Surrounded by former enemies and conspiring aristocrats, Eugenides must navigate the difficult waters of his wife's royal court. His subtle tactics create an unlikely ally of Costis, a young guardsmen, and must eventually prove his worth as the king.
  • (4/5)
    A lot happened in this book. In some places I wished I was reading the Kindle edition, because so many things happened that it would have been very helpful to be able to search for a name in the later half when an event or person from earlier was referenced and I didn't remember the details any longer.

    Only when I finished did I realize that this book uses third person in the way I find most interesting: to reveal, through the eyes of another person (or people) another character far more fully than would be possible when shackled in first person, with all inherent the blinds points of that viewpoint. (Certainly we saw in the Thief just how unreliable an unreliable narrator can be.) Because this book is definitely about Eugenides, and I thought that in some ways it was more successful than the Queen of Attolia in that the reader experienced Costis' gradual acceptance of who Eugenides is, in earning that characterization in a way that made perfect sense with everything we know about him from the first two books.

    My one issue is that I felt like that total acceptance of the Guard and Teleus came possibly too easily in the end, although I suppose if we accept that the Guard's dislike of him was based mainly on their disbelief a his prowess with a sword, it makes sense.
  • (5/5)
    So hard to say much about this as everything is a spoiler. So suffice to say the series has become one of my favorite ever. Gen is such a terrifically complex and surprising character. His schemes and plans are always so complex that although you know he's up to something, it's never quite clear just what until the whole thing falls into place.This book shows him through the eyes of a guard who, the poor thing, has no clue who or what Gen is, but has to find a way to deal with him. At first hating him, as do most of his fellows, and then coming eventually to a fierce loyalty even he can't explain.On to the last current book [Conspiracy of Kings].
  • (4/5)
    "The King of Attolia" is yet again a very different book than its predecessors, "The Thief" and "The Queen of Attolia". Building upon events from the prior books I believe that this one is my favorite of the series so far. There is one more book to go. The Thief of Eddis, Eugenides, now the King of Attolia, plays a dangerous game in this book. Attolia has long been rife with rival factions and some if not most would be happy to have the new King dead and gone. This story is told through the eyes of a young guard who adores his Queen, but initially hates and despises the King, but is very honest and devoted to his service and becomes fiercely loyal to Eugenides.This was a well told tale that I enjoyed very much.
  • (4/5)
    **SPOILER WARNING*** While I always do my best not to reveal anything major about the book I'm reviewing, it's difficult, (if not impossible), to discuss The King of Attolia without at least implying a major spoiler for The Queen of Attolia. If you haven't read that book yet, proceed with caution.A young soldier looks on as the recently-crowned King of Attolia adjusts to his new status.And once again, Turner changes her storytelling method in a surprising way. The Thief was in the first person, with Eugenides as narrator. The Queen of Attolia was in the third person with Eugenides as the primary - but not sole - point of view character. Now, with this most recent installment of the series, Turner rarely tells the story from Eugenides's pespective. He's still very much the centre of the story, but his exploits are all filtered through the eyes of Costis, a young soldier who finds his fate linked with the new king's.I found this an interesting approach. While I initially missed Gen and hoped the POV would shift at some point, I quickly got used to Costis's perspective. It worked well as a means of engaging the reader while still keeping her at somewhat of a distance. Readers already familiar with the first two books in the series, (and I would most definitely recommend that you read them before tackling this one), will find it interesting to wade through the many guises Eugenides adopts as he faces the Attolian court. Costis's impressions of him are bound to differ from the reader's own, letting the reader feel as though she's in on a large and delightful secret. As Costis's view of Eugenides slowly shifts, the story begins to twist and turn in some surprising yet logical ways.Like The Thief, this is a slower story; unlike The Thief, it works right from the first page to the last due to its strong characterization and readable, engrossing style. The plot is much quieter than that of the last two books, with less attention paid to wide-reaching political concerns and more emphasis on individuals. I highly recommend it to readers with an interest in character-based stories.And I certainly hope Turner returns to this work. I feel certain there are more stories here; I, for one, can't wait to read them.
  • (4/5)
    I read the first two of Megan Whalen Turner's Attolian books (more properly referred to as the Queen's Thief series) a few months ago at the behest of some online friends, and found both to be great reads. With school out I finally had a chance to read this, the third installment, and ended up enjoying just as much as the others. Note that if you have not yet finished The Thief and The Queen of Attolia, you probably shouldn't be reading this review—or any of the others. Don't worry, you have plenty of great reading ahead! For those who have made it through the first two volumes but are still in the process of reading the newest book, I'll try to keep the following relatively spoiler-free. "The king sat with his feet on the chair and his knees drawn up to his chest, looking over them and out the window. So motionless was he, and so silent the progress of his tears, that it was the space of a breath before Costis realized the king was crying. When he did, he stepped hastily back out of sight."—pg. 142 Like its predecessor, The King of Attolia can be a frustrating book initially. At the end of Queen, it seems that love will be triumphant: Eugenides, the Thief of Eddis, has not only melted the heart of his true love, the Queen of Attolia, but also secured a tenuous piece between their countries. However, as the curtains open on this new milieu, one finds Gen ridiculed and persecuted by his new court, and seemingly lacking any true romantic relationship with the Queen. For the most part we see him through the eyes of a member of the Queen's Guard, Costis, and the picture we get of the new king is of someone small, weak, cynical, bitter, and just waiting to become the puppet of either the Queen or one of her Dukes. The stimulus of the plot is provided by Costis when he publicly insults and almost attacks the king; in return, Eugenides makes him a personal guard of sorts. Costis' contempt gradually turns into pity, respect, and even love as Gen struggles to find his place in this new world. As much as it is a trial to see Eugenides act so uncharacteristically for much of the book, it is a joy to see him slowly reveal himself within the last half especially. Turner's character's are always beautifully developed; in each book they are constantly learning, and so are we—but not in the Aesop's Fables sense. In the last book I wasn't fully reconciled to the romance between Gen and Irene (Attolia's given name), but their encounters later in this volume are intense, romantic, and—dare I say it of the sequel to a Newberry Medal winner?—yes, even sexy. Moreover, they complement themselves beautifully as both people and rulers. At one point a raging Attolia vents at one of her advisers for preferring the king's mercy to his justice, and though there is justice in his mercy, it is true that to some extent they represent these two qualities as individuals. Deep down, for all her pride and fierceness, she does want him to succeed, to become a true king. But both must make sacrifices for that to happen. Costis, too, has much to learn about honor and loyalty (not to mention humor!) before this book can come to a close. Though it is hard to put down once one comes to the half-way point, there are a few scenes that drag, and why Turner insists on writing sixty-page chapters I don't know; it's not something I remember her doing in the two previous books. It will be interesting to see how The King of Attolia will appear in the context of the entire series, once it's finished. As it is, it's an excellent character piece and leaves one wishing for more.
  • (5/5)
    My favorite of the series so far, by far. The politicking and intrigue absolutely delighted me, as did the flip of seeing Gen and Attolia from other, outside eyes. I kept turning pages eagerly, waiting to see what this event or that move would turn out to /really/ be. This one made me hungry for more.
  • (5/5)
    Again, just beautiful. Costis, an Attolian guard assigned to the despised new King lets us see Gen with an outsiders eyes. From the first two books, we know not to take anything Gen does at face value. And again, every word this author uses has meaning, nothing is wasted.
  • (4/5)
    A bit less in the way of action than the previous two books in the series: this one concentrates on the relationship between Eugenides and the Queen of Attolia, as seen through the eyes of Costis, a member of the Queen's Guard.Sets the scene nicely for the fourth in the series, which is due to be published this year.
  • (5/5)
    Costis, a member of the Queen's Guard, expects to lose his life because he has punched the King in the face. Everyone knows he's just a swindler from Eddis who stole their queen, but obviously, even if you hate your sovereign hitting him is dangerous business. But Eugenides doesn't kill Costis; he promotes him. The new lieutenant instead sees the King at his finest - half asleep during the morning sessions, bored during lessons on history and languages, practicing sword drills in first position. This is the King of Attolia?Because the story is told primarily from Costis' perspective, we are that much more distanced from Eugenides, though his personality still comes out, especially when he speaks with his cousins or Attolia. Though I like this book least of the three I have read, I appreciate it in rereading in ways I did not before. The King of Attolia is more about political maneuvering than the previous books in the series, and more about Eugenides becoming a true king than about the action. Though it can drag in parts, I did read it in a day and have read it multiple times, so I can hardly be too critical on that front.
  • (4/5)
    A great book, interesting, fast read and engaging. While not as good as the first book, more than redeemed Eugenides. It ties everything up neatly and effectively.
  • (5/5)
    She amazes me. I had high expectations and she surpassed them. God this is GOOD. It's entirely about becoming oneself and coming into one's own, with Turner's usual unexpected twists and turns, wonderful characterization and sharp point of view. Five stars for how she manages to make me care about a character I've never even met before. Five stars for how she manages to make me chuckle every time she writes a joke. Five stars for her ability to create suspense out of thin air. Such wisdom in such few pages. Such stakes. Yet, such humanity. Great sequel and an even better novel.
  • (5/5)
    Oh my goodness! A masterpiece. How can these keep getting better. This one gets more subtle and complex as well. Another seemingly very well thought out and interesting shift in the POV. Third person but mostly through the eyes of a king's guard - sort of.

    I wish Megan Whalen Turner had a much larger list of books already written. The fourth book in this series has been ordered as well as her book of fantasy short stories. I'll probable be picking up the couple of anthologies listed that contain her work.
  • (5/5)
    I had a hard time putting these books down. Gen is always so miserable at the beginning of the book. I keep reading through the books quickly to find out what he has up his sleeves and how he will get out of his troubles. I'm glad to have another book to read that follows this one, but I'm sure I'll just miss the characters more after finishing it. Great story telling. I'm very attached to this world and the people who live there.
  • (2/5)
    I don't particularly like the star system of rating, but I can see where it comes in handy with my review here. If it wasn't for the 5, 5, 5 stars running down the page for this book, I would have marked it 3. It's just not that good.

    It's a fun read, engaging and easy, but this author gets no quarter until she comes up with a few female characters that are more than Queen-pawns on Gen's chessboard. Even Dorothy L "Wimsey Worship" Sayers could write some cracking good female characters and they got something to do.

    I was chuffed to read the short story about young Eddis at the end of my edition, so it's not as if Turner's incapable of female characters. More of that please.

    Looking forward to Queen of Attolia, for which I am only approx 75th on the hold list at the library.
  • (5/5)
    This series seems to get a lot better as it goes along. In a way, I almost wish I hadn't read The Thief first, because if you've read that, Eugenides won't have you fooled at all in this book. Still, it probably helps to have the background information. At the end of the second book, I was unsure about the romance, and I'm not convinced that aspect was fully developed before it was introduced, but that doesn't matter as much in this book -- the characters are perfectly believable, now, as is their difficult relationship. The difficulties of it are never once forgotten, and the queen remains a strong character.

    Costis, who is for the most part the POV character, is perhaps not that compelling in himself, but that doesn't matter so much -- for all that Costis is the eyes of the narration, Eugenides is the heart and soul of it. It's fantastic to watch his political hijinks, and the way he balances the right thing for Attolia, the right thing to do morally speaking, and what he wants to do. Even through Costis, we see Eugenides' emotional state when it's important, too, so I kind of felt there was nothing lacking here.

    It was also funny, in that fantastic situational way where you can't explain it when someone asks. It's fantastic.
  • (4/5)
    After waiting six long years, The King of Attolia, sequel to The Thief and The Queen of Attolia, finally came out. Continuing the adventures of Eugenides, the former thief of Eddis, after stealing away the Queen of Attolia, falling in love with her, and exchanging unexpected marriage vows, even though the woman had his right hand cut off, which would render most thieves completely useless. This tension, along with the wonderfully-drawn political intrigue introduced in Queen of Attolia set the stage for the events of King of Attolia.Eugenides is having a tough time adjusting to his role as king. Not only is he unfit for the title, but seemingly could care less. Despite this, Attolia tries to help Eugenides rise to the occasion and gain respect from his subjects, particularly the palace guards. But it doesn't take long for rumors to swirl. Does the Queen truly love Eugenides? Does she just mean to use his love to control him in some political game? Should Eugenides continue to be the king, or is another better suited. Told primarily through the eyes of Costis, Eugenides' man servant and personal assistant, who tends to spend most of the novel disgusted with his master.King of Attolia signals a massive shift in the The Queen's Thief series so far. Instead of following the adventures of a thief, instead readers watch as a fish-out-of-water tries to cope with his new surroundings and adapt to political games. There is less action than in previous novels, which may make it difficult for some readers, but King of Attolia is instead chalked full of political intrigue, witty court games and good old backstabbing. Yeah, I love it.Whalen's writing style has also matured in the six years she's been away from Eugenides's world. In particular, her ability to portray characters has significantly improved. Eugenides was particularly well-drawn, easy to visualize and fully three-dimensional. Heck, I could almost imagine him as one of my friends I hang out with regularly. I got to know him that well with the details Whalen included -and didn't include.King of Attolia is highly recommended for fans of the series, and for YA readers. Even though King is the third book in the series, it's essentially a stand-along title, so readers won't be completely lost if they start here, but I would recommend reading the other books first to get a full picture of the world and the characters.