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The Queen of Attolia

The Queen of Attolia

Écrit par Megan Whalen Turner

Raconté par Steve West


The Queen of Attolia

Écrit par Megan Whalen Turner

Raconté par Steve West

évaluations:
4.5/5 (96 évaluations)
Longueur:
9 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9780062693839
Format:
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Description

Discover the world of the Queen's Thief

New York Times-bestselling author Megan Whalen Turner's entrancing and award-winning Queen's Thief novels bring to life the world of the epics and feature one of the most charismatic and incorrigible characters of fiction, Eugenides the thief. Megan Whalen Turner's Queen's Thief novels are rich with political machinations and intrigue, battles lost and won, dangerous journeys, divine intervention, power, passion, revenge, and deception. Perfect for fans of Leigh Bardugo, Marie Lu, Patrick Rothfuss, and George R. R. Martin.

The brilliant thief Eugenides has visited the Queen of Attolia's palace one too many times, leaving small tokens and then departing unseen. When his final excursion does not go as planned, he is captured by the ruthless queen. The Queen's Thief novels have been praised by writers, critics, reviewers, and fans and have been honored with glowing reviews, "best of" citations, and numerous awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, a Newbery Honor, the Andre Norton Award shortlist, and the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award. Discover and rediscover the stand-alone companions, The Queen of Attolia, The King of Attolia, A Conspiracy of Kings, and Thick as Thieves, all epic novels set in the world of the Queen's Thief.

A Booklist Top 10 Fantasy Books for Youth
ALA Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults
A New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age
Parent's Choice Gold Award
A Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books Blue Ribbon Book

"The Queen's Thief books awe and inspire me. They have the feel of a secret, discovered history of real but forgotten lands. The plot-craft is peerless, the revelations stunning, and the characters flawed, cunning, heartbreaking, exceptional. Megan Whalen Turner's books have a permanent spot on my favorites shelf, with space waiting for more books to come."-Laini Taylor, New York Times-bestselling author of the Daughter of Smoke and Bone novels and Strange the Dreamer

"Unforgettable characters, plot twists that will make your head spin, a world rendered in elegant detail-you will fall in love with every page of these stories. Megan Whalen Turner writes vivid, immersive, heartbreaking fantasy that will leave you desperate to return to Attolia again and again."-Leigh Bardugo, #1 New York Times-bestselling author of Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom

"Megan Whalen Turner proves to be one of the brightest creative talents. With each book, she continues to add new levels and new luster to her sparkling imagination."-Lloyd Alexander, Newbery Medalist and National Book Award-winning author of The Chronicles of Prydain

"Readers will be spellbound."-Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"Turner's storytelling is so sure that readers will want to go along with her-and discover whatever it is that Eugenides will do next."-Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"[An] intense read . . . thoroughly involving and wholly satisfying on all fronts."-The Horn Book (starred review)

Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9780062693839
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre


À propos de l'auteur

Megan Whalen Turner is the New York Times–bestselling and award-winning author of five stand-alone novels set in the world of the Queen’s Thief. Return of the Thief marks her long-awaited conclusion to the epic and unforgettable story of the thief Eugenides—a story more than twenty years in the making. She has been awarded a Newbery Honor and a Boston Globe–Horn Book Honor and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Young Adult Literature. She has twice been a finalist for the Andre Norton Award and won the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children’s Literature. www.meganwhalenturner.org


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4.3
96 évaluations / 55 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    I read the first book in early 2018 and really enjoyed it and for some reason didn't pick up the second book right away. As always when I do that I forgot what I had read in the first book so it took a bit to get into this second instalment. Once I got into it I really liked both Queens and Gen, for very different reasons. I have picked up the third book right away and hopefully will buy more from this series this year.
  • (5/5)
    The Queen of Attolia is the sequel to The Thief. While they are very different books, you probably should read The Thief first. The Queen of Attolia jumps into action immediately, and you’ll likely need the background information that The Thief provides.Whereas The Thief was a more limited story with a first person narration, The Queen of Attolia is a much broader story with a third person omniscient viewpoint that helps it show the relationships and intrigue between three warring kingdoms.Sounis, Attolia, and Eddis are three neighboring kingdoms, all threatened with invasion from the powerful Medes. The countries must unite to stand against the Medes’ powerful empire, but which kingdom will rule the others? Who’s independence will be sacrificed? Eddis, the small mountain kingdom, has one of the most precarious positions of all, but Eddis is determined to maintain her freedom.Much of the book revolves around the battle of wills of the queen of Eddis and the queen of Attolia. It would be easy to fall into the Good Queen vs. the Bad Queen trap, especially as the country of Eddis is the one belonging to the protagonists. However, the situation’s more complex than that, and Attolia is never presented as one dimensional or evil. She’s simply acting as she has to in order to maintain power and do the best for her country, even if it involves taking brutal steps. “She thought of the hardness and the coldness she had cultivated over those years and wondered if they were the mask she wore or if the mask had become her self. If the longing inside her for kindness, for warmth, for compassion, was the last seed of hope for her, she didn’t know how to nurture it or if it could live.” Compared to Attolia, Eddis has an easy time of it. She was instantly accepted as queen and her court adores her. She has people around her that she can trust. She can afford to be nice where Attolia can’t.The characterization is splendid. Eugenides, Eddis, and Attolia are at the heart of the novel and all fascinating characters. If you haven’t guessed, Attolia’s the one who I find most interesting.While Queen of Attolia is marketed as young adult, it almost has more in common with the second world fantasy novels aimed at adults. Political intrigue is not a common feature of the YA genera. However, this makes Queen of Attolia a breath of fresh air. It doesn’t fit into preconceived genre tropes and is allowed to be original and different.My one qualm is that I was a bit dubious with how the romance worked. I was alright with it in the end, but I was giving it sideways glances the entire time.I’d recommend The Queen of Attolia to fans of well written second world fantasy.Originally posted on The Illustrated Page.
  • (5/5)
    After loving The Thief so much, its sequel wasn't going stay long on both the wishlist and the TBR pile. I was expecting more adventures with Gen, more of his awesomeness, more of the mythos of Eddis, Attolia and Sounis, and, going by the name of this book, a lot more about the queen of Attolia.What I was not expecting, though, was to like this one even more than the first.The Thief was amazing, introducing Gen and his quirks and cunning and cleverness. But it was focused mostly on Gen. I am not complaining, but the rest of the characters of this series are quite good as well. In this book, the queens of Eddis and Attolia get more air-time, and they are quite different from Gen. They are complex and, being queens, there is a lot about them that has to do with how they rule. (Oh, and they rule!)And if, to those two queens, we add one king, one pesky foreign ambassador and a whole bunch of disloyal barons and ministers, we get a lot of political intrigue. And I really like that. The expression that comes to mind about this book is "political machinations". And to do yet another comparison with The Thief, in the first there was a lot of cunning on Gen's part, a lot of twists, and a lot of surprises. So this time around, I was on the lookout for those, having learnt to expect the less sensible course of action from Gen. But that doesn't mean that it didn't surprise me here and there (it did, and especially at the beginning that I was afraid of the direction the story was going), but there was nothing really major as on the first book. But I did spend a lot of the time trying to figure out how exactly Gen would get out of his troubles.So, to summarize, I loved this book and will keep on reading (the next book is on its way!).Also at Spoilers and Nuts
  • (4/5)
    The premise: Eugenides luck finally runs out while he's thieving in the Attolian court and caught once more by the beautiful but cold and heartless Queen of Attolia. And her punishment is worse than death, throwing Attolia into war with Eddis, Eugenides's home. And Eugenides isn't recovering from his trip from Attolia very well, which encourages Sounis to attack Eddis as well. But that's not all: Attolia has allies, the Medes, and if the Medes manage to win Attolia over, the whole continent could be lost. All Eugenides has to do to stop it is steal a man, steal a queen, and steal peace.My RatingWorth the Cash: WITH CAUTION. If you've read The Thief, be prepared that despite the same setting and same characters, this is an entirely different book, especially in terms of voice. I can see how people coming to this book FIRST without having read The Thief will have an easier time than I have, because they won't be jarred by the voice or certain revelations. However, coming from The Thief, I am now very suspicious and cautious about reading The King of Attolia. I will, don't get me wrong: I want to see how this trilogy ends and how it fits together as a whole. Whereas The Thief was personal, bold, and often funny, The Queen of Attolia is quiet, reflective, and distant to a certain degree. Like the title character herself. I may have enjoyed this book more if I hadn't had The Thief to compare it to, so it'll be interesting to see how the final book compares.The full review, which contains spoilers and explains in detail the trouble I had reading this, may be found in my LJ. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome.REVIEW: Megan Whalen Turner's THE QUEEN OF ATTOLIAHappy Reading! :)
  • (4/5)
    I wobbled between 3 and 4 stars for much of this. Cards on the table: a lot of what happens in this book was upsetting to me--"No, not that!" I would cry out, mentally, while reading. It kept going in the opposite direction of where I wanted it to go, and there's a good chunk in the early-middle that felt like, if it weren't going opposite, then it wasn't really going anywhere at all.

    (It also didn't feel much like Book One, which felt pitched to a younger audience, more delightful, etc., and was more my taste).

    That said, it gained steam in the middle, and once I got near the end some of my reservations were dismissed--no spoilers, but I guess there's sort of a twist that makes much of this better. And the writing's lovely, and the characters so well drawn, and if you get bored by battle tactics, politics, or treaties, well, the dullest bits are really quite short.

    (Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s).
  • (5/5)
    I super enjoyed this sequel to The Thief. The political intrigue, the new POV characters, the setting and the plot were on point. I really enjoyed having a perspective from Attolia and Eddis as well. It was very interesting to see how the think and what lengths they would go to for their people and countries. Eugenides character really developed in this book I feel a lot more than in the first book. Turner writes so well that I just had to keep reading.

    I really enjoyed the plot and how the story progressed. Turner has a way of writing that just pulls you in and makes you care about the characters.

    Lovely book and I can't wait to get my hands on the next one :)
  • (4/5)
    Very enjoyable.
  • (4/5)
    In perusing the GoodReads reviews for 'The Thief' after I read it, I was struck by the fact that the majority of reviewers seemed to have read it only to get to this book, persevering through it only because they had heard that the sequel was really good. (Implying, of course, that the Thief was not.) Even people who liked it seemed to say that they greatly preferred 'The Queen of Attolia'. Everyone seemed to agree that that was the better book.

    I'm not sure if I agree. They are very different books. 'The Thief' is very slow moving, almost more of a character study, until the action begins in the last third or so. 'The Queen of Attolia' has a lot more action. It's full of intrigue and treaties and wars and betrayals and alliances. However, I actually found myself skipping over some of the pages describing the various maneuvers and battles, and for a long time it seemed like there would be little of the 'stupid plans' and clever thefts I'd come to expect and crave from Eugenides. (Luckily I turned out to be wrong about that.)

    What with the different tone of the book, and the switch from first person to third, it took me a while to really get into the book, and at first I was sure I didn't like it as much. However, by the end of it, I loved it just as much as I had 'The Thief', but in a very different way, because as I said, I feel that they are two very different books.
  • (4/5)
    It's rare that the second book in a series stands head and shoulders above the first. In my opinion, this second book is worlds better than the first. The characters are more complex, the twists more satisfying, and the plotting tighter. The world-building is good but not great, but the awkwardness of setting doesn't stand in the way of this ripping good story.
  • (4/5)
    "The Queen of Attolia" is a very different book than its predecessor, "The Thief". The third person narrative quickly differentiates it as does the much darker tone of the story. The beginning of the novel really bothered me and for a time took away the likelihood that I would enjoy this second book in the series. The storytelling is quite different, but still excellent. The story is more complex with additional characters that sometimes are hard to keep in mind. It took me a while to understand that several years appear to have passed between the end of the first novel and the start of this one. The story played out unexpectedly for me. It again centers around Eugenides, the Queen's Thief, but there is much more political intrigue and war maneuvers. By the end I liked this almost as much as I did "The Thief".
  • (5/5)
    When someone loses a hand in the first 30 pages, you know its on. YA fantasy at its best. Turner expands the world in an effortless and masterful way. Reminds me of Cashore's Graceling and Fire, only better.
  • (2/5)
    I enjoyed this book like the rest of the series but the structure and the point of view was personally very hard to read. I kept feeling a bit dismayed at all the times we bounced between characters and the overall 3rd person viewpoint made it hard to empathize with the characters like I normally do. The characters also felt a bit flat from this angle with emotion muted through the entire novel. This was deliberate on the author's part but still made me feel at times as if I was reading a precise and not a story for enjoyment.The story was enjoyable with unexpected twists and turns almost from the start. Ms. Turner obviously has a devilish mind and enjoys plot twists that are hard to see coming, much more so than the first book in the series. I found the craftsmanship of the way it fit within the series was good but on the whole I think the author's change in perspective should have been saved for another type of story. gallandrl
  • (2/5)
    Wow, this is interesting, I really almost feel betrayed by this book. There's a lot to love about it, especially the characters of the two queens, but the romance? I didn't believe it. At all. I just don't even know how to react to it.
  • (4/5)
    I quite liked the first book, The Thief, but this was far better, for me. There were a couple of points I worried about, as I read -- how the author would deal with disability, and how the romance would turn out -- but as I got to the end, I felt entirely satisfied with both.

    The attitude to disability is refreshing. It happens, and the character reacts realistically, but goes through a process of healing rather than either remaining sunk in despair or just suddenly getting better as if nothing has changed. The character changes because of what happens to them, and that change isn't wished away, even after the intercession of the gods. I was so happy with this aspect -- as compared to other narratives involving disability -- that I ended up buying a couple of my friends copies of the first and second books of these series, because this kind of thing needs to be supported.

    Another aspect of this book that I loved was the development of the Queens. They were interesting characters, in the first book, but very background. In this book, they both get a chance to shine, and some of the narration is limited to their point of view -- although the narration of this book is third person, not first person.

    In terms of the romance, I thought it... rather sudden, at first, but as it developed a little I began to like it despite the suddenness. It isn't really surprising, given how much the narrative in the first book hides from the reader, that I didn't get any sense of foreshadowing of it.

    Like the first book, this one contains a bit of a twist at the end -- perhaps a little more telegraphed than in the first book, and not quite as integral to the plot, maybe. Still, I thought it was a nice touch.
  • (5/5)
    Something happens at the beginning of this book that is just kind of heartbreaking, and it too me a little while to get over. It's a pleasure to get to know the character progressively throughout the story. This sequel is a lot more intricate and complicated than its predecessor, but not less enjoyable.
  • (4/5)
    When his small country goes to war, the Thief of Eddis must use all his cunning to keep the nation from destruction.I came to this book through The Thief, which I read last month. I was a little leery going into it, but my fears were largely unfounded. The first book took quite a long time to get going, and lacked that certain panache that makes slower stories seem engaging. This one has got panache to spare. I really, really enjoyed it.I think Turner made a good move in switching from first person to third. The shift allows for much more character development as Turner invites the reader inside each character's head. It wasn't the plot that hooked me so much as these beautifully realized fictional people. It's possible to see where everyone is coming from, even when you disagree with their decisions. I really came to care for them, and I was always eager to see how things would turn out for them.That's not to say that the plot is shabby. It most definitely isn't. Turner opens the story with a pretty big bang, and the intensity never lets up. She definitely doesn't pull any punches; like all the best children's authors, she treats her young audience as capable of dealing with whatever she throws at them. There's a lot of dark stuff here. Bad things happen to good people. Characters are forced to do terrible things in order to survive. The war gives rise to a lot of issues surrounding combat and political struggles. Turner does an excellent job of dealing with all these plot elements, and she manages to do so while still delivering the sorts of clever twists and turns that fans of the first book are sure to expect.Much as I enjoyed it, though, I did feel that a couple of things surrounding the final resolution could have been developed a bit better. Hopefully they'll be fleshed out in the next book.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this book. It wasn't the best I've ever read, but it wan't bad. It had just as many twists as the first in the series.
  • (5/5)
    This is the second book in the series, following "The Thief." I liked the second book even better than the first because it went deeper into the politics of Sounis, Eddis and Attolia. While still a fantasy, the book had a lot of details taken from history that made it more believable. The twist at the beginning was really shocking and the rest of the book follows that trend of surprises. I would recommend it to fantasy and adventure lovers.
  • (4/5)
    This excellent follow-up to The Thief initially had me worried for the central character, who experiences a significant setback in the opening chapters. However, Eugenides, through his struggles, develops into a richer, more interesting character who I am much more invested in following through the next books in this series. Eugenides grows up a lot in this book and becomes a much more likable and understandable person. I hope the rest of this series continues to be as good!
  • (4/5)
    This is insanely good. The craft with which this is written is just unbelievable.
  • (5/5)
    The very first time I read the Queen of Attolia I was expecting a traditional story but Megan Whalen Turner is not a typical author and not a straight forward storyteller. It's not to say the book is difficult to read, but that time and time again I read her stories and am amazed at how many different layers of meaning she implies at.Sometimes I read too fast and I can miss the beautiful craft of her words but now that I have read and reread The Queen, I can take time to savor each well crafted phrase.
  • (4/5)
    A good book that is much better the second time around. The first I was too angry at all the characters. The plot works, and much as I wish it hadn't happened, it was a good book
  • (4/5)
    I love Eugenides as a character. I enjoyed the foil of the two queens. The writing in this book is beautiful. I loved reading the relationship between Attolia and Eugenides. What I did not like, the war between the different countries. I generally skimmed over any part that mainly dealt with just the war. Favorite Quote from the book. Eddis talking to Eugenides, "If I am the pawn of the gods, it is because they know me so well, not because they make up my mind for me."
  • (5/5)
    Oh how wonderful! I love Turner's ability to seemingly slow down the plot while simultaneously having chaos and war at stake. The character development in this is second to none and I was awestruck by her portrayal of the Queen of Attolia as I went from loathing her to being utterly impressed by her by the end of the book. Her female characters are amazingly complex and some of my favourite passages have to do with the two queens' developing friendship. Such carefully detailed writing too which conveys a range of emotions. Beautiful series.
  • (4/5)
    It's always a treat when the the second book in a series is better than the first.
  • (4/5)
    The beginning of this book is a shock and the rest of the book isn't much less of one, truth to be told. There is a bit of grim romance in this second book in the series and the sweetness of the end of the story makes up for much of the war and intrigue that fills so much of this story. I like Eugenides more and more.
  • (4/5)
    Aww.. :) Happy Endings. <3
  • (5/5)
    The Best book ever!
  • (3/5)
    I had decided to pick this series up because I had dipped briefly into the sequel, "The King of Attolia" and found it intriguing. The first book, "The Thief", had much to recommend it, with its invented Greek mythology, its Alexandrian science (these ancient Greeks have primitive guns), its unreliable narrator, and its rather Roman architecture. This one, while still innovative in its way, is contrived, with a grim tale leavened with unsuitable humour, some bizarre plot holes, and no real explanation of the gods' behavior. I'm still hanging in there for the third one, since that is what got me interested in the series in the first place.
  • (4/5)
    After not having been blown away by The Thief, I was a little wary of starting this. I should not have been. The Queen of Attolia is a delightful book, full of politicking and warring and delicious character development in unexpected ways (in one instance in a way that seems a bit too pat and out of nowhere, but I find it hard to mind much because frankly I enjoyed the results).Turner seems to get better as she goes. If only all series were so luck!