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The Thief

The Thief

Écrit par Megan Whalen Turner

Raconté par Steve West


The Thief

Écrit par Megan Whalen Turner

Raconté par Steve West

évaluations:
4/5 (220 évaluations)
Longueur:
7 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9780062693815
Format:
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Description

Discover and rediscover the world of the Queen's Thief, from the acclaimed series launch The Thief to the thrilling, twenty-years-in-the-making conclusion, The Return of the Thief.

New York Times-bestselling author Megan Whalen Turner's entrancing and award-winning Queen's Thief novels bring to life the world of the epics. This first book in series introduces one of the most charismatic and incorrigible characters of fiction, Eugenides the thief. The Queen's Thief novels are rich with political machinations and intrigue, battles lost and won, dangerous journeys, divine intervention, power, passion, revenge, and deception. Perfect for fans of Leigh Bardugo, Marie Lu, Patrick Rothfuss, and George R. R. Martin.

Eugenides, the queen's thief, can steal anything-or so he says. When his boasting lands him in prison and the king's magus invites him on a quest to steal a legendary object, he's in no position to refuse. The magus thinks he has the right tool for the job, but Gen has plans of his own. The Queen's Thief novels have been praised by writers, critics, reviewers, and fans, and have been honored with glowing reviews, "best of" citations, and numerous awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, a Newbery Honor, the Andre Norton Award shortlist, and the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award.

A Newbery Honor Book

An ALA Notable Book

A YALSA Best Book for Young Adults
A Horn Book Fanfare Book
A New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age
A Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books Blue Ribbon Book
A Junior Library Guild Selection

"The Queen's Thief books awe and inspire me. They have the feel of a secret, discovered history of real but forgotten lands. The plot-craft is peerless, the revelations stunning, and the characters flawed, cunning, heartbreaking, exceptional. Megan Whalen Turner's books have a permanent spot on my favorites shelf, with space waiting for more books to come."-Laini Taylor, New York Times-bestselling author of the Daughter of Smoke and Bone novels and Strange the Dreamer

"Unforgettable characters, plot twists that will make your head spin, a world rendered in elegant detail-you will fall in love with every page of these stories. Megan Whalen Turner writes vivid, immersive, heartbreaking fantasy that will leave you desperate to return to Attolia again and again."-Leigh Bardugo, #1 New York Times-bestselling author of Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom

"Trust me. Just read it. Then read it again, because it will not be the same river twice."-Lois McMaster Bujold, acclaimed and Hugo Award-winning author of the Vorkosigan Saga, the Chalion Series, and the Sharing Knife series

"In addition to its charismatic hero, this story possesses one of the most valuable treasures of all-a twinkling jewel of a surprise ending." -Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"To miss this thief's story would be a crime."-Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (starred review)

"A literary journey that enriches both its characters and readers before it is over."-Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"A tantalizing, suspenseful, exceptionally clever novel."-the Horn Book (starred review)

Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9780062693815
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

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À propos de l'auteur

Megan Whalen Turner is the New York Times–bestselling and award-winning author of five stand-alone novels set in the world of the Queen’s Thief. Return of the Thief marks her long-awaited conclusion to the epic and unforgettable story of the thief Eugenides—a story more than twenty years in the making. She has been awarded a Newbery Honor and a Boston Globe–Horn Book Honor and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Young Adult Literature. She has twice been a finalist for the Andre Norton Award and won the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children’s Literature. www.meganwhalenturner.org


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4.1
220 évaluations / 109 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (2/5)
    My god, I could not get into this book. There's so much eating and sleeping in it...and passing out and waking up later. Or maybe I just wasn't able to focus well. For whatever reason I had a really difficult time concentrating on this one... I think I would have liked it more when I was younger.

    I have heard the sequels are great, though, so I may give the next one a try.
  • (3/5)
    A solid fantasy with a whiff of Greek mythology and a determined thief.
  • (4/5)
    Overall, I found The Thief an enjoyable light read. It’s quick (I read it in under a day) and entertaining.From the back: “The king’s scholar, the magus, believes he knows the site of an ancient treasure. To attain it for his king, he needs a skillful thief, and he selects Gen from the king’s prison. The magus is interested only in the thief’s abilities.”The Thief is excellently written. Turner’s word craft is deliberate and effective. This book should be used as an example for the fact that young adult literature does not mean “badly written.”“All of my own impulses to balance and move seemed to conflict with those of the guards, and I was jerked and jostled down the portico, just as graceful as a sick cat.”The most interesting thing about The Thief is Gen, it’s unreliable narrator. His voice is never tiring or bland, and he remains witty throughout. Gen is intelligent and complicated, often holding back as much as he reveals, making for a nice plot twist at the end.The biggest flaw of The Thief is that the majority of it is spent traveling from Point A to Point B, which became dull in places. Interspersed through these parts where some “stories within a story,” myths of the gods and heroes. At first, these did not seem to have any purpose besides to add cultural background and world building at the expense of slowing down the story. However, as the book progressed these stories became highly relevant.Also, there were hardly any female characters in The Thief. I’d heard this going in, along with the fact that the sequels are apparently better in this regard (edit - this is true). It didn’t stop me from enjoying The Thief, but I hope the woman who shows up at the end of the book has a larger role in the sequels (edit - she does).I’d recommend The Thief for people looking for a quick and entertaining fantasy read.Originally posted on The Illustrated Page
  • (5/5)
    Gen, a thief that likes to brag about being able to steal everything, is stuck in prison, and it isn't a pleasant experience. But his luck changes when the king's magus comes to him with a task that will make all his troubles go away. The ultimate theft, the hardest of all, one that no one has been able to do. So of course Gen accepts the challenge.This book incited some curiosity from me a long time ago. It was fantasy and with a thief, it seemed nice. But it wasn't until a friend pointed me to literary showdown of characters that I wanted to really read this one. Because, you see, Gen was the winner, and the final battle was against Howl! Who was this Gen that could be more awesome than Howl? So I set out to read this book to find out.And I have to agree with all the voters. Gen is more awesome than Howl. But let's get back to the book. It is fantasy, but there is a Greek influence, which was really nice. There are no clear references, but something about the plethora of gods and their stories, of mountains and hot weather, of old stones and temples, and the sheer amount of olive trees just screamed Greece to me.The story kept me on my toes, reading page after page, chuckling a lot, and always wanting to know what would happen next. And I say chuckling because this book is also extremely funny. Gen is an amazing character, as I said before. Just because he was getting a ticket to walk out of jail, he didn't make the life of his rescuers/jailers any easier. He was obnoxious and impertinent and insufferable and an wise ass all the time. But it was an act, with him always thinking what else he could do to further annoy his companions. His voice throughout the book (he tells the story) is amazing, and gives little away of what will happen next, or what the conclusion of the story will be. And concerning that, although the ending did not exactly surprising me, I didn't see it coming either. It made so much sense that it happened like that, that the only surprise was that I didn't notice it or figured it was going that way.This is the beginning of a series, one that I'll keep on reading, for sure, but is a book of his own as well, not just an introduction. It ends with hints for the next book, but the thief's story is (more or less) finished (at least this first adventure is, I hope there are a lot more).It's safe to say that I loved it.Also at Spoilers and Nuts
  • (4/5)
    After not being able to find this book for a long time, I was thrilled to get my hands on it recently. I read it as soon as I was able, and I must say, I enjoyed it very much, despite certain narrative devices that I will not name here. :) Readers who enjoyed Scott Lynch's The Lies of Locke Lamora will enjoy this one, I think, provided they don't mind the YA flare. The character of Gen sounds like I would imagine a young Locke Lamora would with a first person POV, but unlike The Lies of Locke Lamora, which I felt ran away with the world-building a wee bit, this book is rather grounded, a fast read, with a cooling setting based on Ancient Greece to boot.The premise: Gen is a thief who boasts he can steal anything, which lands him in the King's prison. He's stuck there until the King's magus has use of Gen's skills--to steal something that might not even exist, a stone blessed by the gods with the gift of immortality, and the right to rule a kingdom. To his captors, Gen's only a tool, but he's got plans of his own.The full review, which does include spoilers, can be found in my journal. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)REVIEW: Megan Whalen Turner's THE THIEFHappy Reading!
  • (5/5)
    I had very little expectation going in, and it won me over very quickly. This is a textbook example of how to create character in the best way possible (I've read too many books where the inhabitants differ in name only), yet without labelling or telling, it's so skillful.

    The plot is pared down to its essentials--so great to read something so streamlined and perfect--and then she delivers a masterful, unpredicted turn-of-events near the end--it's just exquisite writing, from conception, character development, plot pacing, sentence structure, dialogue--I bow down.

    Complete unexpected treasure. (Thanks, Goodreads.com's recommendation engine, for recommending this one!)

    (Note: 5 stars = rare and amazing, 4 = quite good book, 3 = a decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. There are a lot of 4s and 3s in the world!)
  • (5/5)
    4.5/5 stars
    I really enjoyed this book! It was a nice quick read, the characters were interesting, the world was well built and the plot moved fairly quickly. It was a bit short, but it was what I needed to be able to get into the longer books I want to tackle :)

    Great read, can't wait to continue the series.
  • (4/5)
    Gen is a thief who is currently in jail due to his own bragging. The king's magus offers him a deal for his freedom in exchange for his assistance stealing an object of great power, an object that may even be a myth. The following adventure was very entertaining and I look forward to the next instalment, which I have heard is even better than the first.
  • (5/5)
    Gen is the best thief in all of Sounis ... or at least he used to be. Now he's rotting away in prison. He's "rescued" by the King's advisor, who wants him to steal something very special. They set off to sneak into a foreign land and find a legendary stone that will determine the fate of three whole countries.Somehow I had not heard of this series at all until about a year ago. It just passed me by completely. It's a good mid-90s historical-feeling fantasy, like Sabriel or Tamora Pierce's books. I really enjoyed the elements of Greek history and mythology, which were subtle and respectful. It was very odd that there were no women in the book until the last 30 pages, and even then one of the two women is repeatedly called ugly. But that's the 90s for you I suppose. I really enjoyed the book and it was easy to read, so I'll definitely read more in the series.
  • (4/5)
    A fun read, The Thief follows the journey of Gen from a cell in the King's prison to a journey after a mythical treasure. Gen is an interesting character, full of complaints about food and witty comments about gods. His companions, an advisor to the king, a soldier, and two young noble boys, liven up the narrative. One of the most interesting aspects of this story are the myths about the gods which the characters recount to each other. Clearly based on Ancient Greece, The Thief is a fascinating tale drawing on myth and good writing to make it shine.
  • (5/5)
    Incredible.
  • (3/5)
    Liked enough to continue with the series
  • (4/5)
    This is the first book in the series and a nice introduction to it. The reader gets a real view of Gen, the main character and come to love him. The book told one story, sheltered from the other things going on in the series. It really allowed you to learn about the main characters before they are incorporated into a much larger story in the second and third books, which I liked. I would recommend to fantasy and adventure readers.
  • (4/5)
    Beginning was fairly slow and uneventful but once the action started it really took off and the ending was quite good. More review to follow soon.
  • (3/5)
    Twas sometimes fun, twas sometimes boring. Other than that, I don't have much to say about The Thief. Can't wait to read the next book in the series though!
  • (5/5)
    Upon reflection, Gen might not have made the smartest move by bragging about his thieving prowess in every wine shop in Sounis, then stealing the king's signet ring and showing it off afterward. He has plenty of time for reflection in the king's dungeon. Unexpectedly, the Magus, advisor to the king, is the one who gets Gen out of jail -- he needs Gen to steal something for him, and it will indeed take the best thief in the world to accomplish the job...I first read this Newbery Honor book years ago, but it's the sort of book that sticks with you (well, and I've read it a few times since then, too). This book boasts great characters and more than one twist of plot -- and it almost seems like a spoiler to even mention that there are plot twists, because they are so delightfully unexpected. And, while this is an excellent book, the series increases in excellence as it goes on -- but do start here! I'm rereading, having recently read the newest entry in the series, and am already finding mention of things that come together later on. If sometimes I say things are "recommended" or "highly recommended," this is a step beyond that. This series carries my highest recommendations.
  • (3/5)
    I can't wait to read the next in the series!
  • (4/5)
    From the beginning, The Thief decieved me. From when I first saw the captivating cover jumping out at me from a YA table at Barnes & Noble up until the moment I picked it up at my local library I was convinced that it was the beginning of a new YA series, likely something high fantasy due to the cover. However, when I looked it up at the library, I found it odd that the book was stocked in the children's section, and even odder that it originally a a completely different, more "kid friendly" cover that touted its success as a 1997 Newberry honor book. Yeah, I know, totally not expecting that. So, just a warning that this is just a re-released, re-packing children's novel masquerading as a new YA series.Once I got past the initial shock, I actually really enjoyed The Thief, it's a witty, fun adventure with a lush world that filled with exciting plot twists and thrilling action. It tells the story of the thief Gem, who is in prison for stealing the king's seal. Without trying, be comes involved in the king's magus' quest to find Hamiathes's Gift, said to be the creation of the gods that confers the right of rule on the wearer. Gen embarks on an exciting adventure that will make readers cheer for him.Though The Thief pulls off the YA novel well, it is, at its heart, a charming, witty little children's novel.
  • (4/5)
    A grand rollercoaster of an adventure story with lots of twists and turns in the most unlikely places. The very fact that this is narrated in first person is in itself misleading since this tends to make readers assume that they're being told everything the protagonist does and thinks (yes, I know there are other exceptions- I've read some of them!).Gen, an imprisoned thief, is recruited by the king to steal a mystical(and possibly nonexistent)artifact as the condition of his permanent release.
  • (3/5)
    Not as spectacular as I expected based on reviews I've read elsewhere. But nevertheless, still somewhat entertaining. For it's target age group, this should indeed be an exciting adventure.
  • (3/5)
    This is a young adult novel which won the Newbery Honor award. Other books I've read which have won this award have been more complex (e.g. Susan Cooper), so I was a bit surprised at this one. It's a fairly easy read, but some bits were a little confusing (some of the confusion is alleviated in the last chapter, but that doesn't stop it from reading somewhat less smoothly than expected at earlier points). Not much happens in most of the book - it's mainly a journey, with a group of unlikely travelling companions whose characters really aren't fleshed out much at all, including the protagonist (it's first person). You really don't get a sense of them and who they are, and what their motivations are, which was probably the main drawback of the book for me. You're constantly guessing who they are - their actions are not really that consistent. I suspect this whole issue is partly because it's first person, and the narrator character has no insight into them either, but still. I've seen first person done better.The book is very clearly based on ancient Greek culture, and it works OK as long as you accept that from the start and don't mind where it deviates.In general, I'd say the last chapter saved this book, and would make me want to read the sequels. I think not all the sequels are first person either, and some may be following different characters. This is almost a set-up book. But I don't know if I liked it enough to actually get the sequels. We'll see. It had potential.
  • (5/5)
    This is an excellent book for children and teens. The writing style is neither difficult nor simple, so kids 10+ and even adults can read it without being bored or frustrated. The main character is incredibly personable, and readers just can't help cheering for him. The story may seem predictable at first, but don't let that fool you! There are dozens of plot twists you would never expect, and the ending is something no one could guess. I gave this book to my little brother who hates reading, and he loved it! The style is engaging and urges readers to never put the book down.
  • (3/5)
    The story of Gen, an imprisoned thief since he bragged to everyone that he was the biggest thief in the world - in front of the King's spies. He is freed and forcibly enlisted by the King's Magus to travel to Attolia to steal a mythical object, one that can only taken by a masterful thief. The party includes the Magus' two apprentices and a bodyguard and they all must work together on the quest.Honestly, the book was mediocre. Gen is a charming, charismatic thief (as he should be), but that's not enough to pull a novel along. I didn't care about the other characters and they seemed one-dimensional. The big "Thief Trial" was boring and didn't live up to the hype when Gen figures it out. There were some amusing twist and turns, but somehow this book is lacking that certain something. The person who told me about this series said that this book was only okay but you have to go through it to get to the next two, which are stellar.The book also could have greatly benefited from the inclusion of a map. I was sorely confused most of the time since the party travels through three kingdoms, among numerous rivers and across fields and mountain ranges. The author often refers to these landmarks to describe where the party is travelling, and I don't have enough of a visual memory (or the patience) to keep track of these things in my head. If I can't, I don't know how many kids will be able to do it.
  • (2/5)
    On the positive side, I did like the mythology and I liked a couple of the characters. But the only reason I kept reading is that I expected that something interesting would eventually happen; there had to be a payoff somewhere. The surprising revelation at the end offered a decent resolution to the story (I suppose), but wasn't worth slogging through the previous two hundred pages.
  • (4/5)
    I read a review that had a spoiler, so the ending didn't come as a surprise, but this journey fantasy was wonderful all the same. I do enjoy a good quest, and the questing gang was entertaining, the world was interesting, and the mythology skewed enough from Greek standards to be eerie. I'm really looking forward to spending more time with several of the characters. I'd give this to someone looking for a straight fantasy/swordplay story, or someone who enjoys mythology.
  • (4/5)
    Great option for boys. It had a good amount of adventure mixed in with some mythology that will be familiar to readers but presented in fresh way. Romance is present, but you are not hit over the head with it. Ending is excellent.
  • (4/5)
    When I was thinking about series books to read in 2013, this Newberry Honor book came to mind. I had scribbled down the author and title several years ago and then forgotten about it. I tend to like well done young adult fiction such as Lois Lowrey's "The Giver", so I gave "The Thief", first in a 4 book series a read. Much of it is a relatively simple story, a journey, that becomes more interesting and complex as the story progresses. We know very little at the start about what is going on. Information is witheld from us about a variety of things, especially all of the characters. The parts that seem a little slow really aren't a problem because the story is so well written. The descriptions of the landscape were very good and really brought vivid pictures to life in my mind as a reader. A simple description of the story would make it sound like a generic mediocre medieval adventure, but it is better than that. I didn't try too hard too hard to puzzle out the mystery - I just let myself enjoy the story. It really picks up in the latter part of the book, and makes up for the rather bland first half. I liked this and look forward to continuing the series soon. 3 1/2 - 4 stars
  • (4/5)
    Whalen Turner's story is nuanced and starts slowly, hinting there is more to the characters and scenario than first meets the eye. Interesting that Eugenides (Gen) is not particularly likeable, a punkish adolescent with talent and altogether too happy to remind others of it. Satisfying that no character is one-dimensional, and though Gen proves to be a classic unreliable narrator, the trickery is not laid on too thick.Worth pursuing the other books, and perhaps most invitingly in order to learn more about the world, as much as the characters or for the story. The story is short enough to work as a novella, the others may very well read quickly, too.//World-building is first rate, and the use of myths (relayed as stories within the story) suggests Whalen Turner understands them not only as quasi-science, or theology, but also as a deep vein of cultural meaning and cohesion. The gods and goddesses fit seamlessly with character motivations and outlook, and inform both urban & rural social life.The political dimension is both believable and quite sophisticated, but is neither grafted onto the world nor intrusive. Expect this element of the storytelling will feature to a greater extent in the subsequent novels.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book with high hopes after seeing many a person glee happily at seeing it on my tbr list. Sadly, I was rather disappointed. The Thief is a somewhat mediocre adventure story filled with characters who are not terribly interesting, likeable, or fleshed out. The one thing that stands out here is the world. The landscape and myths Turner lays out are fascinating and well done, and the latter especially pay off nicely in the end. The final twist is another lovely point - it might almost be worth the entire experience for the gut-wrenching shock of that.That said - this book is absolutely worth reading, if only to get to The Queen of Attolia and The King of Attolia. The two sequels are immeasurably better, building on the first book's strengths and discarding many of its weaknesses. The characters are more engaging, the plots more interesting, and the narrative structure tighter and better crafted. I wonder if much of the enthusiasm for this book isn't tinged by the experience of reading the later books. I imagine Gen looks rather different on a re-read.
  • (4/5)
    Know what I liked best? That the main character, The Thief, was a bit of a shit to quote Bridget Jones Diary. And thank the stars. Sometimes male characters come off as always noble, self-sacrificing, self-doubting and ultimately victorious over adversity. It gets tiresome. Gen though is the best thief, knows it and lets everyone else know it. Read like an arrogant prick but that was half the fun.
    Otherwise its a solid old-school fantasy adventure, much in the vein of Alexander's Chronicles of Prydain which is high praise since I loved those books. The world is a mish mash of Greek and Medieval folktales but inventive enough. A good guy pick as the romance elements are buried under courtly intrigue.