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The New Trail of Tears: How Washington Is Destroying American Indians

The New Trail of Tears: How Washington Is Destroying American Indians

Écrit par Naomi Schaefer Riley

Raconté par Christa Lewis


The New Trail of Tears: How Washington Is Destroying American Indians

Écrit par Naomi Schaefer Riley

Raconté par Christa Lewis

évaluations:
4/5 (4 évaluations)
Longueur:
7 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Nov 28, 2017
ISBN:
9781541480551
Format:
Livre audio

Description

If you want to know why American Indians have the highest rates of poverty of any racial group, why suicide is the second leading cause of death among Indian men, why native women are two and a half times more likely to be raped than the national average, and why gang violence affects American Indian youth more than any other group, do not look to history. There is no doubt that white settlers devastated Indian communities in the 19th, and early 20th centuries. But it is our policies today—denying Indians ownership of their land, refusing them access to the free market, and failing to provide the police and legal protections due to them as American citizens—that have turned reservations into small third-world countries in the middle of the richest and freest nation on earth.

The tragedy of our Indian policies demands reexamination immediately—not only because they make the lives of millions of American citizens harder and more dangerous—but also because they represent a microcosm of everything that has gone wrong with modern liberalism. They are the result of decades of politicians and bureaucrats showering a victimized people with money and cultural sensitivity instead of what they truly need—the education, the legal protections, and the autonomy to improve their own situation.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Nov 28, 2017
ISBN:
9781541480551
Format:
Livre audio


À propos de l'auteur

Naomi Schaefer Riley is a contributing writer at The American Enterprise and a frequent contributor to the Wall Street Journal, the Boston Globe, and National Review. Her articles have also appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Weekly Standard, the New York Post, the New York Sun, the New Republic, Commentary, Crisis, the Public Interest, the New Atlantis, and First Things. Ms. Riley is also the editor of In Character, a journal of the John Templeton Foundation, and an adjunct fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. Since graduating from Harvard magna cum laude in 1998, she has worked as assistant editor of Commentary, as well as an editorial intern at the Wall Street Journal editorial page and National Review. She has been the recipient of the Phillips Foundation Journalism Fellowship, the Intercollegiate Studies Institute Journalism Fellowship, the Claremont Institute Publius Fellowship, and the Charles G. Koch Fellowship.

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  • (4/5)
    Naomi Schaefer Riley is a Harvard graduate in English and Government and a regular columnist for the New York Post where her writings focus on higher education, religion, philanthropy, and culture. Her newest book looks at the problems facing American Indians and the reform necessary to stop the decline of their culture. The title of the book immediately puts the reader into blaming mode, making it appear that government failures are the reason behind the increased crime, poverty, and alcoholism found in many of the tribes. But, can the government really be at fault? Schaefer Riley describes the fallout of too much government control, too much dependence on tribal annuities, and failures in the education systems in her thorough research of American and Canadian Indian tribes and reservations.Living near a reservation and seeing first hand the level of poverty and splintering families, I found myself nodding along to many of the author's points. Many tribes have become so dependent on the government and tribal handouts from casinos and programs that there is no desire to be educated or to work. Those that want to escape the stronghold of the tribe can't because they are limited by tribal rules regarding loans and property ownership. The government bureaucracy is such that the help provided has become a hindrance, yet the political structure is so deep that changing the system would be nearly impossible. Schaefer Riley has interviewed tribal leaders in Montana, New York, and South Dakota with some finding ways to get around the laws and others feeling defeated and have given up. I found the most frustrating part of her research to be their educational system. To me, everything depends on education and without it, no one can succeed. My nephew is a high school English teacher on a Minnesota reservation and has talked frequently about the difficulties teaching his students. Many have to walk miles to get to school and in the winter, under feet of snow, students just won't show up for days, even weeks. Attendance is spotty due to severe poverty and violence in the home. School may be the only place they can get a meal that day and truly feel safe, yet the obstacles to getting there are too many. How can you make reading and writing important when their parents' only importance is focused on their next drink or how soon the next annuity check is coming? Reform is needed in many areas including the allowance of land ownership, education, and effective law enforcement. Some reservations, like ones in Northern New York, have found ways to succeed by circumnavigating the government and creating their own businesses and schools. Finding ways for the rest of the reservations across the country to follow suit will be difficult, but necessary to save the future generations of American Indians from the prevalence of suicide, poverty, crime, and drugs. The personal stories shared in this book are quite depressing and frustrating. It's hard for the reader to determine who to express anger to, the Bureau of Indian Affairs with its billion dollar budget and thousands of employees or the local leaders who are turning a blind eye to the needy families right in front of them. I hoping this book makes it way into the right hands to start the conversations that need to be had.
  • (3/5)
    I have no knowledge of what life is really like living on the reservation. I only know what I have read in history books and what my mom has told me about her experiences growing up around some Indians. I like reading about true stories or people. Therefore I was interested in reading this book. While I did find it to be an interesting read at times it did read a little stiff for me with not a lot of moment. I don't disagree on what our National has done to the American Indians is terrible but reading this book, it did seem that how they live now is not all the product of the past. It seemed that some of it has to do with how the American Indians choose to life their lives that has caused the outcome of some to live in deplorable conditions. This book is a table read. One that can be brought up as a conversation piece. Because there is so much to take in and the fact that I did not always find myself engaged, I had to take a break from this book and come back to it. Although, I am glad I checked this book out.
  • (4/5)
    Good book! If you're unfamiliar with problems on the reservation, then this is a good primer. I was amazed how much of the material and talking points I had already known through personal experience.
  • (5/5)
    This is such an amazing and well-researched book. HIGHLY recommend! Definitely a 10/10 read.