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On the Come Up

On the Come Up

Écrit par Angie Thomas

Raconté par Bahni Turpin


On the Come Up

Écrit par Angie Thomas

Raconté par Bahni Turpin

évaluations:
4.5/5 (592 évaluations)
Longueur:
11 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Feb 5, 2019
ISBN:
9780062840684
Format:
Livre audio

Note de l'éditeur

Shining sophomore story…

Return to Garden Heights from “The Hate U Give” with Angie Thomas’ lauded sophomore story. Bri is working to make it big as a rapper, despite all the setbacks in her path, including racial stereotypes and poverty. The raw power of rap takes center stage in this star of a novel.

Description

This is the highly anticipated second novel by Angie Thomas, the author of the number-one New York Times best-selling, award-winning The Hate U Give.

Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least get some streams on her mixtape.

As the daughter of an underground rap legend who died right before he hit big, Bri's got massive shoes to fill. But when her mom unexpectedly loses her job, food banks and shut-off notices become as much a part of Bri's life as beats and rhymes.

With bills piling up and homelessness staring her family down, Bri no longer just wants to make it — she has to make it.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Feb 5, 2019
ISBN:
9780062840684
Format:
Livre audio

À propos de l'auteur

Angie Thomas is the author of the award-winning, #1 New York Times bestselling novels The Hate U Give, On the Come Up, and Concrete Rose, as well as Find Your Voice: A Guided Journal for Writing Your Truth. A former teen rapper who holds a BFA in creative writing, Angie was born, raised, and still resides in Mississippi. You can find her online at www.angiethomas.com.


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4.5
592 évaluations / 39 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    Good. Includes actual rap and stuff which the main character says. Balanced and real; not just 'poor kid becomes star and all is well'. A bit about being yourself, a bit about poverty and a lot of fun.
  • (5/5)
    Angie Thomas does it again! I felt this book to my core. I couldn’t put it down. It pulled me in from the very first chapter and I was hooked until the very end. This is one I have to purchase and add to my bookshelf.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent, on every level. This is the best Young Adult novel I have ever read.
  • (4/5)
    Great book! Not as emotional as THUG but both moving and thought-provoking.
  • (5/5)
    very nice. relatable and captivating story. great flow. held me all through to the end.
  • (5/5)
    Angie Thomas does it again. Her voice is distinct, her characters well developed and lovable, and I adore Bahni Turpin’s narration. The evolution of Thomas’s characters is so endearing - this book will have you cheering for Bri and feeling like a proud big sister. Angie Thomas is on the come up!
  • (5/5)
    This books was awesome and entertaining. I highly recommend this book. Beautiful story line.
  • (5/5)
    I love Angie Thomas's books. Her sophomore novel is just as powerful and impactful as her debut! I cannot wait to read/listen to everything else she publishes.
  • (5/5)
    All that speaks out the tip of tongue is wow.
  • (5/5)
    This was a masterpiece and I’ve no more words ????
  • (5/5)
    Excellent book! Excellent audio book! Enjoyed it immensely! Definately recommend
  • (5/5)
    CHILLS. I got literal chills at the end. What a fantastic book. Loved it!
  • (5/5)
    Another BRILLIANTLY written and narrated book by Angie Thomas. I can't wait to listen to her next book, Concrete.
  • (5/5)
    Best audiobook I have ever listened to. I‘d recommend the audiobook over the written copy
  • (5/5)
    The book and narration were awesome. I hated to have it end.
  • (5/5)
    This is an amazing audiobook, I’m glad I chose this medium for it
  • (4/5)
    This isn't as well-crafted as THUG and I have a theory that this book was written before Ms. Thomas' first published novel. If anyone can confirm or deny this theory, please let me know.
  • (4/5)
    Like fionaanne, I also thought this might have been written prior to THUG, but may have been a little harder to market first. I think the success of THUG might have smoothed the way for OTCU. Bri, her family and the plot Come Up seem less...nuanced compared to THUG. Of the two, I personally liked THUG more, but it's not a competition and there's room for both. OTCU is also worth reading. Both books feature strong, teen female characters who are become, somewhat hesitantly, influential voices within their community and among their peers.Angie Thomas is a fiercely talented writer with the potential to reach readers by portraying an under-represented character POV who feels fully formed, real and human. I imagine there are a lot of girls who will see themselves and their friends in this book and identify with Bri. That's a really good thing.
  • (5/5)
    Angie Thomas' second novel is about teen rapper Bri Jackson who is following in her father's footsteps in the hip hop world, but navigating the trials and tribulations of being a black sixteen year old girl caught between the world of Garden Heights and the more privileged world of Midtown School of the Arts. I enjoyed how this novel was a return to the world created in The Hate U Give (even referencing the shooting that was central to that story). Thomas' writing keeps you turning the pages and appeals to young adult and adult readers alike.
  • (4/5)
    Bri is better at rapping than at school work. When she finally gets recognized for her talents, she's then accused of inciting violence. Meanwhile, her family struggles with the possibility of eviction. Thomas' 2nd book has the same voice of disenfranchisement and anger as THUG. This is a powerful look at life for some African Americans.
  • (3/5)
    I haven't yet read The Hate U Give, but really enjoyed the movie, so I was excited to see Angie Thomas's second novel available as an option. While I found it pretty enjoyable, I also have to say it was a bit repetitive in places. I remember what is was like to be a teenager and think I know so much better than literally everyone around me, but damn the main character just runs around making bad choices and being a pain one everyone's ass. I'm not saying I need the characters I read about to be flawless, but I do want to understand why others like them in spite of those flaws. With Bri, I mostly wondered why anyone would want to be around her for more than five minutes. It was a good, fast moving story but a more likable main character would have really elevated it to great.
  • (5/5)
    This was an awesome book! I haven't read her first book but I definitely will after this one! The story is about a 16 year old girl who wants to be a rapper. She definitely goes through a lot to get where she wants to be. All the characters were great and the cliffhanger at the end! WTF?!?! Who was it? Why it could be anyone???All in all it was a great read that I couldn't put down.
  • (4/5)
    The best thing is strong characters,courageous and brilliant Bri; loyal Sonny and Malik; outspoken, loving Jay; sensitive Trey.No, the best thing is friendship,Bri, Malik and Sonny have each others' backs since childhood.No, the best thing is learning respect for rappers,top folks create lyrics on the spot and speak for others.No, the best thing is Angie Thomas' writing,voice, tone, relevance, authentic language.
  • (5/5)
    The author of The Hate U Give, Angie Thomas, has written another YA hit in On the Come Up. 16 year old Bri's father was a hip-hop legend, killed by gang violence when she was young. She's hoping her rapping skills can get her a record deal and help her family (mother Jay and brother Trey) out of poverty. Keeping gas and electricity going, and food in the fridge, is a challenge, and her mother is determined that Bri will do well on the ACTs and go to college. Bright Trey has dropped out of college to work at a pizza place to bring some money in.Like The Hate U Give, this one is set in Garden Heights, a mirror of downtrodden urban areas across the country. Thomas is so good at capturing realistic dialogue and daily dilemmas, including the risks of choice and the costs of bad choices. Sometimes a bad choice seems like the only choice there is.Race, gender, class and poverty issues all affect the characters' daily lives. Bri is a battler, which often gets her into trouble her white classmates don't experience, even for similar behavior. Her mother is an ex-drug addict who loses her job, and has to scramble to make ends meet. At the same time she's working to restore her daughter's trust from her time of despair and addiction.It may sound like a grim book, but it's actually the opposite. There's hope and humor and love and romance, even amid dire circumstances. Bri is a dynamic rapper, and we experience the excitement of her first competitive bout, and all that comes after. The end seemed a bit "tidy" to me, but this is a YA book. Bri is a wonderful, imperfect character learning what's important to her, and how to live with integrity in a difficult world. Another winning book from Angie Thomas. Four and a half stars.
  • (4/5)
    I felt nearly the same about this book as I did about The Hate U Give. I appreciate what Thomas is doing. She breaks things down in way that creates connections -- White people often seem flummoxed by the way Black people respond to individual events (there is a tendency to not see patterns), many do not seem to understand how rage and frustration build until they spill over. (I just watched a doc on the Fyre festival, and rich White young adults were ready to kill after a day without organic produce and bottled water - it was Lord of the Flies in there.) Thomas fills in the story, and that is so important. I like too that she has written a book in which Black teens see themselves and their friends on the page. Extra points for the times Bri talks about how she creates rhymes. The poetry here is very good, and the exploration of how she puts together her rhymes, especially when freestyling, is truly fascinating. I liked all the characters. I do think many things were oversimplified, but I think that is endemic to the YA genre, and that is why I read very little of it. My biggest beef here is that the teens talk to one another in the way that 35 year old women talk to one another. The voices seemed inauthentic. I thought the teens rang truer when talking to the adults in their lives than with their friends. Note: I listened to the audio and the reader was great.
  • (4/5)
    Bri dreams of being a rapper and hip-hop artist, like her father before her. He was on his way to fame when he was murdered by a neighborhood gang when she was just a baby.It seems her break has come when she is invited to perform at a neighborhood open mike. But life is more complicated than that as Bri deals with neighborhood gangs, music producers with agendas not matching her own, overt racism at her gifted high school and a mother who wants her to focus only on school.I really enjoyed this slice-of-life coming-of-age story of a gifted girl in a tough neighborhood. This is the second YA novel by Thomas, and while it is not a plot taken straight from newspaper headlines as was [The Hate U Give], it’s a good strong story as Bri learns to navigate wanting to further her career and help her family – as well as honoring them.
  • (3/5)
    Same narrator and neighborhood as The Hate U Give - with a different character and set of circumstances. Bri is a hot-headed teenager trying to follow her dream of being a rap star while dealing with the stress of her family trying to keep its head above water financially.
  • (4/5)
    On the Come Up is a realistic novel that takes place in the Garden where The Hate U Give also took place. This novel happens shortly after the riots from the first book, but the characters are new to you.Bri is the daughter of an underground rap legend who was killed by gang members, and now she wants to be known as the "greatest rapper of all time." The novel focuses on her laser-like focus on getting famous as quickly as possible but on her own terms. She isn't her dad and wants people to see her and hear her music. Yes, she wants to be famous, but she more desperately wants to help her family. They are behind on every bill and have little food. Her brother has graduated from college but can't find a job that pays well. He'll need to go to grad school in order to get a good job in his field. Her mom is a former drug addict. Bri's memory of her mother leaving her and her brother at their grandparents' house haunts her. Her mom has been sober for eight years and has now been laid off from the church. Life is rough, but Bri loves her family and has strong support from them. Bri's social life gives her more support--when she accepts it. Her two best friends want her to succeed. Success will come her way if she does well in a battle, a rap battle. Her drug-dealing aunt gets Bri a spot in the next battle; she's up against Milez--the son of her father's manager. When the battle is seen on YouTube, people start some buzz about her. She clearly stomps Milez. Another even happens when Bri is violently handled by white security agents at her school where people of color are treated differently by security. The unfairness eats at Bri. It's when she's writing a song around her aunt's friends that everything goes crazy because she's writing real lyrics about her life and how she's been treated. No one is listening. The students of color are ignored again. The song becomes a local hit, but it's controversial. Bri is perceived as dissing a local gang and being "ghetto." She gets very angry and has difficulty controlling herself when people misinterpret the meaning of her lyrics. These lyrics, however, get her a manager. She's on the come up now! Here's some hope but at what cost? Bri cannot control her temper which leads to friction with her friends who want to help and with Bri keeping secrets.I know comparing books is not always a great thing to do, but I liked the Hate U Give better. I had a hard time liking Bri. I have great sympathy for her situation as she feels she has no control and the world is against her. She feels like she's constantly in a battle that is designed to lead her to failure and no one will listen to her. I get it. What bothers me is how she treated everyone. She didn't apologize much either. if she was called on her behavior by people she cared about, she responded they were wrong. She behaved badly and treated people badly--no excuse. Even her family tells her that--more eloquently I might add. She's not to blame for where she lives and the poverty they have, but she should acknowledge how she treats people. She grew up in the Garden and knows what it's like, but she didn't act like she understood why she got in a dangerous situation. Someone raised there wouldn't have been so naive. I'm glad I listened to the novel because the narrator was OUTSTANDING! I like the book; it's well-written; I think it should be read by many people. Until we understand each other, we won't learn to care for each other. Our goals should be to always help all people "come up" in life, especially when life is harder for some than others.
  • (5/5)
    This sophomore effort from Angie Thomas (The Hate U Give) stays high in the firmament of stories of the lives of black girls struggling to run - not the world - but their own corner of it. Brianna is the daughter of a slain rapper father and a mother eight years into her recovery, and she carries the weight of and love for both as she competes in local rap battles (the author shares Bri's talents). To move up and gain fame means depending on the same exploiters that hitched a ride on her father, and also to possibly leave behind a traditional path to success through a fine arts high school. There's also an aunt who is sells drugs, her bougie grandparents and their stiff-necked church, her two close male friends from childhood, gangs, her neighborhood in the aftermath of a riot, and a supportive brother. An incident with security guards at her school kicks the plot into motion and brings her to prominence with a hard edged rap, written in anger, that misrepresents who Bri is and forces her to make decisions about social media hype and being true to her own values. The book charts at the top of heartfelt and sincere, and reveals the nucleus of a world that’s home to many African American teenagers. Quotes: "The school counselor asks questions that sound like they came from some "How to Talk to Statistical Black Children Who Come to Your Office Often" handbook.""The unspoken rules for going into a store: 1. Keep your hands out of your pockets and your backpack; 2. Always use "sir" and "ma'am"; 3. Don't go into a store unless you're planning to buy something; 4. Keep your cool if they follow you around; 5. Don't give them any reason to think you're up to something."
  • (5/5)
    16 year-old Bri Jackson is a talented rapper who hopes that music will be the way out of her gang-controlled neighborhood and unstable family life. Every time she is on the come up though, something happens to remind her of who really has the power. She can play the role outsiders have cast for her as a black girl from the hood, or, like Starr from THUG, she can take a risk, find her voice, and speak truth to power. Despite her life full of tension, I feel like she finds some peace in the end and comes to terms with the fact that she is who she is because of her family and the Garden. I like that she has a moment where she realizes she is a role model for younger kids after she hears them rapping her violent lyrics without understanding the back-story. “I am somebody’s hope, I am somebody’s mirror (440).” I am sure this book will be too.